Macedonian

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MACEDONIAN LODGE

MA_Macedonian.jpg

Location: Milton; Quincy ()

Chartered By: Richard Briggs

Charter Date: 06/14/1893 1893-36

Precedence Date: 08/24/1892

Current Status: Active


PAST MASTERS

  • William H. Puffer, 1892; Mem
  • Freeland D. Leslie, 1893, 1894; Mem
  • Edwin D. Wadsworth, 1895, 1896
  • Charles F. Hall, 1897, 1898
  • Frederick W. Archer, 1899, 1900
  • Dexter E. Wadsworth, 1901, 1902
  • Joseph T. Greene, 1903, 1904
  • Charles E. Letteney, 1905, 1906
  • Clarence Boylston, 1907, 1908
  • Edmond J. Carpenter, 1909, 1910
  • Lincoln Damon, 1911, 1912
  • Jesse B. Baxter, 1913, 1914
  • Edward F. W. Bartol, 1915, 1916
  • W. Newton Harlow, 1917, 1918; Mem
  • Charles F. Spargo, 1919, 1920
  • Frederick A. Gaskins, 1921, 1922
  • Frank A. Gibson, 1923, 1924
  • Leon P. Hallett, 1925, 1926
  • Charles D. Kidder, 1927, 1928; SN
  • Winthrop I. Carpenter, 1929, 1930
  • J. Herbert Raymond, 1931, 1932
  • Charles F. Newcomb, 1933, 1934
  • Roland S. Fulton, 1935, 1936; N
  • Alan M. Ross, 1937, 1938
  • John M. Grandy, 1939, 1940
  • John J. Davis, 1941
  • A. Victor Thompson, 1942, 1943; N
  • Alfred V. Huntley, Jr., 1944, 1945
  • Lester C. Fulton, 1946, 1947
  • Jay M. Whitham, 1948
  • A. Ralph Durning, 1949, 1950, 1990; N
  • Ralph A. Powers, 1951, 1952
  • Herbert C. Lang, 1953, 1954
  • Kenneth P. Lodge, 1955, 1956, 1977-1979; N
  • Alfred L. Clapp, 1957, 1958
  • Ellsworth R. Wells, 1959, 1960
  • Charles A. Stellberger, Jr., 1961, 1962, 1976
  • George H. Goodwin, Jr., 1963
  • Roy S. Pihl, 1964
  • Charles I. Foster, 1965
  • Carl L. Douglas, Jr., 1966
  • Charles E. Norton, 1967, 1982, 1983; N
  • A. Robert Lamarra, 1968
  • Frank W. Milne, 1969
  • David W. Ellis, 1970
  • Arthur E. Johnson, 1971, 1991, 1992
  • Norman L. Porter, 1972, 1973
  • David S. Small, 1974, 1975, 1987
  • Henry C. Tiews, 1980, 1981, 1984
  • Roy S. Morrison, 1985, 1986
  • Stephen R. Cappers, 1988
  • David C. Lilley, 1989
  • Howard R. Graden, 1993
  • Charlie M. Long, 1994
  • John D. Cruckshank, II, 1995, 1996
  • Douglas A. Russell, 1997
  • John W. Manzer, 1998
  • Allan R. Webster, 1999
  • Thomas A. Pardy, 2000, 2002-2004
  • Peter F. Jahn, Jr., 2001
  • Robert J. Purcell, 2005-2007
  • Lance P. Powers, 2008
  • John E. Bean, 2009-2012

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Dispensation: 1892
  • Petition for Charter: 1893

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1917 (25th Anniversary)
  • 1927 (25th Anniversary)
  • 1942 (50th Anniversary)
  • 1967 (75th Anniversary)
  • 1992 (Centenary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1898 1900 1904 1911 1918 1920 1923 1925 1926 1929 1930 1931 1936 1938 1972 1985 1986 1998 2008 2012 2014

HISTORY

  • 1942 (50th Anniversary History, 1942-151; see below)
  • 1967 (75th Anniversary History, 1967-301; see below)
  • 1992 (Centenary History, 1992-49; see below)

50TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, JUNE 1942

From Proceedings, Page 1942-151:

By Worshipful Charles P. Newcomb.

The history of fifty years of any Lodge is a tedious and uninteresting narration if an attempt is made to chronicle all the events in that long span of years. Bearing this in mind, we have endeavored, in presenting this history of Macedonian Lodge, to cover only the high spots as we see them.

In 1892, several Masons in Milton and the Lower Mills Section of Dorchester conceived the idea of establishing a local Lodge and thirty-eight members in good standing petitioned the Grand Lodge for a dispensation to form such a Lodge. Milton is situated in the center of three Masonic Districts and therefore permission to form a new Lodge was requested from and granted by Union Lodge of Dorchester of the Fourth District, Hyde Park Lodge of Hyde Park of the Twenty-fifth District and Rural Lodge of Quincy of the Twenty-sixth District. On June 24, 1892, the Grand Lodge granted a dispensation to start a new Lodge, to be known as Macedonian Lodge and located in the Town of Milton. Between the time the petition was signed and the dispensation granted, one other member joined the ranks so that there were thirty-nine Charter members who signed the By-Laws.

Our Mother Lodge was Union of Dorchester, of which fact we have always been justly proud and this is a good time to explain where Macedonian Lodge derived its name. During the anti-Masonic period in the early part of the nineteenth century, many Lodges surrendered their charters. Union Lodge, however, continued to hold their meetings throughout the period and three of the men responsible for the successful continuance of these meetings were Worshipful Robert M. Todd, Brother Thomas T. Wadsworth and Worshipful Charles Breck. All three of these Brothers lived on the south side of the Neponset River and they took turns transporting the charter from their homes to the Lodge. For this service, their determination and courage, they became known as the "Three Macedonians."

When our Lodge was started, the name Macedonian appealed to the organizers. The cover of our notice is designed with the three Macedonians and the name "Macedonian" across the front in the letters of the Greek alphabet. It will be recollected that Macedonia was one of the greatest empires of ancient times, whose strength was the result of the courage and determination of its leaders. The portraits on our notice, from the left to right, are Worshipful Robert M. Todd, Brother Thomas T. Wads-worth and Worshipful Charles Breck. A son and grandson of Brother Wadsworth were Charter members of Macedonian Lodge and both subsequently became Masters of the Lodge. A son of Worshipful Brother Breck, Brother Charles E. C. Breck, was also a Charter member of the Lodge.

The first meeting of the Lodge was held in Fraternity Hall on June 28, 1892. Thirty-four members were present. Of these members, only one is still living, Brother Scott T. Doten, who is with us tonight. Brother Doten was our first Tyler. Twelve applications for the degrees were received at this first meeting, and also at this meeting, it was voted that the stated communications be held on the fourth Tuesday of each month. This has never been changed.

The annual meetings were voted to be held on the second Tuesday of October but this was changed in 1899 to the second Monday of January, which was continued until 1931, when the annual meeting was changed to the fourth Tuesday of November and no change has been made since.

The original By-Laws of the Lodge were adopted at the fourth regular communication, September 27, 1892.

Fraternity Hall is that portion of our apartments where our smoking room is now located. At the time our Lodge was started, however, there were no toilet or coat rooms. The place where the men's toilet is now located was the kitchen, which was outfitted with a gas stove and sink.

During the first year of our existence, regular meetings were held in July and August. Between August and September meetings, a fire occurred in the building which made the hall unavailable for several months. The members of the first class of candidates therefore took their Entered Apprentice degree in Fraternity Hall, the Fellow Craft Degree in the Milton Town Hall and the Master Mason Degree in the Odd Fellows' Hall on River Street. The members of the first class were Brothers Warren S. Thayer, Alfred H. Crossman, Samuel A. Morse, Bradford O. Hamilton and Charles S. Barker. Only one of these members is still living, Brother Bradford O. Hamilton. In December, 1892, the Lodge returned to Fraternity Hall for the regular communication. Several other organizations of a non-Masonic nature also held their meetings in Fraternity Hall.

In 1903, during the administration of Worshipful Joseph T. Greene, the Lodge membership had reached 147 and the quarters in Fraternity Hall were too small. On March 24, 1903, therefore, it was voted to "lease and furnish" new quarters to be provided in the building. How these new quarters were obtained is of interest.

The room in which we are now sitting was formerly a theatre. The room where the Tyler's desk is located was the balcony. To provide for the new Lodge-room, a new floor was installed, which is the floor of this room. To get the necessary head room, the floor was depressed, which accounts for the inclines at the entrances. Very few Lodges have such an entrance and the candidates entering the room for the first time, hoodwinked, get quite a sensation. The new Lodge-room was finished during the summer of 1903, and on September 11, 1903, Most Worshipful Baalis Sanford paid us a visit for the purpose of dedication. We continued to use Fraternity Hall on our regular communications as a banquet hall and the other organizations continued to use it for their meetings.

In connection with the furnishings of our Lodge-room, it seems appropriate to mention the illuminated symbols of the third degree. These symbols make quite an impression on the candidates and visiting Brethren, as very few Lodges have this feature. In the Fourth District, the only other apartments to have them are at Jamaica Plain.

From the dedication of the new Lodge-room in 1903, conditions remained the same until January, 1922, when at the annual meeting Worshipful Frederick A. Gaskins, who was Master at that time, reported that an opportunity had been offered for the Lodge to purchase the Associates' Building and provide a permanent home for the Lodge. It was voted at this meeting that the Master appoint a committee to confer with the stockholders regarding the purchase of the building. As a result of the conferences, the Milton Masonic Building Association was formed and the building was purchased with the help of the members, who bought shares at $50.00 each. The apartments were then refinished in their present shape and since that time only Masonic bodies or organizations affiliated with Masons have occupied the third floor. At the present time the apartments are used by Macedonian Lodge, Milton Lodge, Milton Chapter Order of Eastern Star and Milton Assembly No. 38, Order of the Rainbow for Girls. Guy Ham Chapter Order of Eastern Star also use the apartments for their installations.

In 1922, the Lodge membership had reached 521 and it became evident that there was a strong feeling that there was room for a second Lodge in Milton. On February 28, 1922, petitions were received at the regular communication of the Lodge for permission to start two new Lodges. After some discussion, it was voted to refer the matter to a committee to report at the March meeting. At this meeting, it was voted that the petition for Chicatawhat Lodge be refused and the petition for Milton Lodge be granted. Milton Lodge was thus started and has been operating in pleasant relations with Macedonian Lodge ever since.

On June 19, 1917, the Lodge celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary. At this meeting we were honored by a visit from Most Worshipful Leon M. Abbott and a distinguished suite of Grand Lodge Officers. Eleven of the seventeen living Charter members were present. At this meeting also, Brother H. Clifford Gallagher, who had been Treasurer of the Lodge since its start, was honored by the presentation of a twenty-five year service jewel. Brother Gallagher continued to serve as Treasurer for several years longer.

On December 12, 1919, a special communication was held at the Masonic Apartments in Roxbury, with permission of the Grand Lodge, for the purpose of welcoming home our members who had served in the first World War. Most Worshipful Leon M. Abbott was present at this meeting with his suite of Grand Lodge Officers to participate in the ceremonies. Forty members of Macedonian Lodge who had served in the war were present. A tablet bearing the names of these members hangs on the east wall of our Lodge-room. This tablet was dedicated on January 5, 1921, and Past Grand Master Leon M. Abbott was the principal speaker at the dedication ceremonies.

In 1924, we received a bequest amounting, with interest, to $5607,95 from Charlotte A. Stevens, a daughter of Worshipful Brother Robert M. Todd. This was to be used to provide a suitable memorial for her father. At the June 28, 1927, meeting it was voted to expend the sum of $5000 to purchase a new organ in memory of Brother Todd. This night was the occasion of our thirty-fifth anniversary and we had as our guest Most Worshipful Frank L. Simpson, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts. The new organ was installed during the summer of 1927 and was dedicated on December 27, 1927. Right Worshipful Charles D. Kidder was Master at that time and it was largely through his influence that it was installed. We have always felt that it is a great asset to the Lodge.

When Macedonian Lodge was first organized, it was assigned to the Fourth Masonic District. At that time all the Lodges in the District were under the direction of one District Deputy Grand Master. In 1927 the number of Lodges in the District had so increased that the District was divided into three sections, Dorchester, Roxbury and South Boston, and since then we have been included in the Dorchester Fourth Masonic District.

Since the start of the Lodge we have been very fortunate in the selection of what might be termed our non-advancing officers. These include the Treasurer, Secretary, Marshal and Tyler. We have had only four Treasurers, eight Secretaries, eight Marshals and five Tylers. One of each of these stations has served for over twenty-five years and has been presented with a twenty-five year service jewel, Brother H. Clifford as Treasurer, Brother Arthur W. Jenkins as Secretary, Brother William H. Young as Marshal and Brother James Spencer as Tyler.

During our fifty years of existence, we have received eight visits from Grand Masters. Most Worshipful Leon M. Abbott visited us twice in the capacity of Grand Master and once as Past Grand Master.

Eight hundred fifty-two members have signed our By-laws. Our largest year in membership was 1924, when we had 569 members. Our membership at the present time is 368.

We were fortunate in having at the start of our Lodge leaders of determination and intelligence. The obstacles which confront a new Lodge were safely overcome. While at the early part of the last decade the conditions were serious, because of the fact that the number of new candidates was more than offset by the larger number of deaths of our older members, we have for the past few years been holding our own and we are now in a position where we can look forward with confidence to a continuing prosperity for our second fifty years.

75TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, JUNE 1967

From Proceedings, Page 1967-301:

By Wor. Ellsworth R. Wells.

The beginnings of Macedonian Lodge are to be found in the year 1892. Several Masons residing in Milton and the Lower Mills section of Dorchester, desiring to further the growth of the Fraternity in the area, conceived the idea of establishing a local Lodge. Thirty-eight members in good standing petitioned Grand Lodge for a dispensation to form a new Lodge.

Inasmuch as the Town of Milton was situated in the center of three existing Masonic Districts, permission to form a new Lodge was requested of and received from Union Lodge of Dorchester in the Fourth District, Hyde Park Lodge of Hyde Park in the Twenty-fifth District and Rural Lodge of Quincy in the Twenty-sixth District.

In the meanwhile, another interested Brother joined the group; so when the dispensation was granted on June 24, 1892, there were thirty-nine Charter Members to sign the by-laws.

Macedonian Lodge is genuinely proud to claim Union Lodge as its Mother Lodge. To this day a warm friendly relationship exists between the two Lodges. The very name of "Macedonian" derives from a series of interesting circumstances chronicled in the archives of Union Lodge. The story merits telling at this time:

It involves Worshipful Robert M. Todd, Brother Thomas T. Wadsworth and Worshipful Charles Breck. These are the "Three Macedonians" whose familiar portraits appear on the cover of our Lodge Communication. All were members of Union Lodge.

During the anti-Masonic period of about twenty years in the early part of the nineteenth century, many lodges surrendered their charters and became inoperative. Union Lodge, however. continued its meetings throughout this entire period in spite of the many problems then existing. In no small measure this was made possible by the efforts of "The Three Macedonians" who lived on the south side of the Neponset River, or in Milton. They took turns in secreting the charter of Union Lodge in their homes and transporting it to the Lodge so that meetings could be held.

For this service, their determination, courage and zeal they became known as "The Three Macedonians." No doubt a direct allusion to one of the greatest empires of ancient times, Macedonia, whose strength was founded in the courage and determination of its leaders.

Then too there is the speculation of a relationship to the biblical story wherein we find St. Paul preaching and doing God's work in the Turkish seaport of Troas.

"And a vision appeared to Paul in the night. There stood a man of Macedonia and prayed him saying 'Come over into Macedonia and help us'."

Paul crossed the Thracian Sea into Macedonia and continued his ministry.

So if we allegorically refer to the Neponset River as the Thracian Sea and Union Lodge in Dorchester as Macedonia, we have our Three Macedonians travelling from Troas, or Milton, across the water with courage and determination to carry out their self-appointed mission even as St. Paul did those many years ago in Macedonia.

A son and a grandson of Brother Wadsworth were Charter Members of Macedonian Lodge and both became Masters of the Lodge. A son of Worshipful Charles Breck, Brother Charles E. C. Breck, was also a Charter Member of the Lodge.

The first meeting of the Lodge was held on June 28, 1892. Thirty-four members were present. Twelve applications for the degrees were received. At this first meeting it was voted that the stated communications of the Lodge would be held on the fourth Tuesday of each month. This has never been changed. The Annual Meetings were voted to be held on the second Tuesday of October. This was changed in 1899 to the second Monday of January which was continued until 1932 when it was voted to change the Annual Meeting to the fourth Tuesday of November.

The first meeting was held in Fraternity Hall which is our former Smoking Room and present Banquet Hall. This after the third major renovation of the building, the first phase of which has been completed. Meetings were held in July and August of that first year of Macedonian Lodge. Between the August and September meetings there was a fire in the building which, incidentally, was erected in 1881-1882 and was known as the Milton Associates Building.

Interestingly enough, when parts of the ceiling above our former Cloak Room and the area in the back of it were removed to install a new steel carrying-beam, the charring of the roof rafters and other structures was plainly in evidence. Many of us speculated upon the cause having no knowledge at the time of this fire in the summer of 1892.

Fraternity Hall was not available again for meetings until December 1892. Macedonian's first class of candidates received the Entered Apprentice Degree in Fraternity Hall, the Fellowcraft Degree in Milton Town Hall and the Master Mason Degree in Odd Fellows Hall on River Street, Dorchester.

The members of the first class were: Brothers Warren S. Thayer, Alfred H. Crossman, Samuel A. Morse, Bradford O. Hamilton and Charles S. Baker.

In December of the year 1892 repairs were completed. The Lodge returned to Fraternity Hall for its regular communication. At that time several other non-Masonic organizations also held their meetings in Fraternity Hall.

By 1903 the membership of the Lodge had reached 147. It was decided that the facilities in Fraternity Hall were too small. So on March 24th it was voted to "lease and furnish" new quarters to be provided by the building. It was at this time that the first of the three extensive renovations of this building took place. The Lodge Room as we see it tonight was probably the major result of these first renovations. Fraternity Hall continued to be used as a banquet hall. The other organizations continued to use it for their regular meetings.

The history of this building and the area surrounding the site upon which it stands is a fascinating subject. It parallels the development of the Town of Milton itself. Here the first settlers built homes because the Neponset River was fordable. In the 17th century the Stoughton Grist Mill was built on what is now Adams Street. This was followed in 1717 by a wool mill and in 1728 by the first paper mill in New England. By 1885 the Baker Chocolate Factory had absorbed most of the mills and Milton was primarily a milling town as its name denotes. During the 18th and most of the 19th centuries the population of the area consisted of the mill workers and the commercial interests that supported them. For instance, the first trading business store was built and operated by Messrs. Vose and Fenno on the site of this building at 60 Adams Street.

This room was formerly a theatre. The room where the Tyler's desk is located was the balcony. To provide for this new Lodge Room, a new floor was installed. To get the necessary head room, the floor was depressed, which accounts for the inclines at the entrances. Very few lodges have such an entrance and candidates entering the room for the first time, hoodwinked, get quite a sensation. The new lodge room was completed during the summer of 1903. On September 11th, Most Worshipful Baalis Sanford visited Macedonian Lodge for the purpose of dedication.

On June 19, 1917 the Lodge celebrated its 25th anniversary. Most Worshipful Leon M. Abbott and a distinguished suite of Grand Lodge Officers honored Macedonian Lodge by their presence. Eleven of the seventeen living Charter members were present. Brother H. C. Gallagher, who had been Treasurer of the Lodge from the beginning was honored by the presentation of a 25-Year Service Medal.

With the permission of Grand Lodge and for the purpose of welcoming home our members who had served in World War I, a Special Communication was held in the Masonic Apartments in Roxbury on December 12, 1919. Most Worshipful Leon M. Abbott and his suite were in attendance as were forty members of Macedonian Lodge who had served in that war. To the right of the Master's station hangs a bronze tablet bearing the names of these members. This tablet was dedicated on January 5, 1921 with Most Worshipful Leon M. Abbott as the principal speaker.

At the Annual Meeting in 1922 it was announced that the Lodge had an opportunity to purchase the Milton Associates Building as a permanent home. A committee was appointed to confer with the stockholders of the Milton Associates regarding the purchase. As a result of these conferences the Milton Masonic Building Corporation was formed. The building was purchased with the help of the members who bought shares at $50.00 each. The apartments were refinished and from that time until this month only Masonic bodies or organizations affiliated with Masons have occupied the third floor. Macedonian Lodge continues to be the majority stockholder in the corporation.

At the present time the apartments are used by Macedonian Lodge, Milton Lodge, Milton Chapter Order of DeMolay, Milton Assembly Order of Rainbow for Girls, and Bethesda Lodge, I. O. O. F. Until fairly recently the apartments were also used by Milton Chapter and Guy Ham Chapter, Order of Eastern Star.

By 1922 the Lodge membership had reached 521. There was considerable feeling that there was room for a second lodge in Milton. At the regular communication on February 28, 1922, petitions were received for permission to start two new lodges.

The matter was referred to a committee with instructions to report their findings at the next meeting. As a result, in March it was voted that the petition of Chicatawhat Lodge be refused and that the petition of Milton Lodge be granted. Milton Lodge was thus started, and has prospered and operated in pleasant relationship with Macedonian Lodge since its founding. In 1924, Charlotte Stevens, daughter of one of our "Three Macedonians," Worshipful Robert M. Todd, left the Lodge a sum amounting with interest to $5,607.95 which was to be used to provide a suitable memorial of her father. At the regular meeting in June 1927, it was voted to expend $5,000. to purchase a new organ in memory of Brother Todd. The new organ was installed that summer and dedicated the following December on the 27th. Right Worshipful Charles D. Kidder was Master at the time. It was largely through his influence that the organ, which has been such an asset to the Lodge for the last forty years, was installed. Truly a beautiful memorial to one of our "Three Macedonians."

When Macedonian Lodge was organized, it was assigned to the Fourth Masonic District. By 1927 the number of lodges in this District had so increased that is was divided into three sections: Dorchester, Roxbury and South Boston. Since that time Macedonian Lodge has been in the Dorchester Fourth Masonic District.

The Lodge's "Fiftieth Anniversary" was appropriately recognized in a visit by the Grand Master, Most Worshipful Albert A. Schaefer, and his suite of Grand Lodge Officers on June 23, 1942.

Included in the program for that evening was the reading of a letter of congratulations from Union Lodge, signed by the Master, Wor. Chester L. Whittemore, sighting the bonds of friendship between our two Lodges and reading in part:

"Macedonian Lodge has been prominent in our history too. It is interesting to note that nearly 100 years ago, in 1846, Union Lodge needed help to promote interest and attendance. We looked over the Neponset River for Macedonia and found Bros. Todd, Breck and Wadsworth. In response to our call they joined us on our fiftieth anniversary and took the offices of Senior Warden, Junior Warden and Senior Deacon respectively and became our 95th, 96th and 97th members. They were known as "The Three Macedonians" and after completing their work and making a place for themselves in our history answered another call and left us to lend their assistance elsewhere. Union Lodge has always been grateful to them."

Following the Installation of Officers on November 28, 1950, our present Secretary but then Master, Rt. Wor. A. Ralph Durning, was presented the Joseph Warren Medal for distinguished service to Masonry in token of two outstanding years as Master but even further for developing successfully an original idea of holding an Annual Communion Breakfast of the combined Fourth Masonic District under the sponsorship of the Fourth Lodge of Instruction.

Most Worshipful Thomas Sherrard Roy, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, accompanied by Grand Lodge Officers made a Fraternal Visit to the Lodge on June 23, 1952. Assisted by his Marshal, Rt. Wor. Herbert H. Jaynes, and the Officers of Macedonian Lodge, he raised Bro. Rev. Robert Latham Weaver.

Macedonian Lodge has ever been mindful of its responsibility to the youth of our nation. Specifically to the young men of Milton and therefore in 1955, in concert with Milton Lodge and the Milton Mosaic Club, this Lodge co-sponsored Milton Chapter, Order of DeMolay, which now meets in these apartments.

Throughout the years Macedonian Lodge has been very fortunate in that for the most part the station of Chaplain has been filled by members of the clergy. One of such members became a Master Mason in this room about ten years ago or on November 19, 1957 when Rev. Bro. Ronald W. Ober was raised to the Sublime Degree by Rev. Dr. Francis D. Taylor, 33rd Degree, assisted by the late Rev. Bro. Harry Folger, Jr., as Senior Deacon and a team of Methodist ministers. The charge was delivered by the candidate's father-in-law, Dr. Daniel L. Marsh, Chancellor of Boston University. Rev. Bro. Ober went on to serve the Lodge as Chaplain for several years before accepting a call to continue his ministry at another location.

In a period of seventy-five years any lodge experiences losses, some of personnel, others possibly financial and still others material. Macedonian Lodge has been no exception. Not too long before the occasion of which I am about to take note, this Lodge, and indeed Milton Village itself, lost an historic landmark, for the clock which stood for many years on the sidewalk at the entrance to this building was destroyed quite by accident by a large trailer-truck. Following its destruction many inquiries were made concerning it by townspeople and others that followed the route over Milton Hill. Happily, Mrs. Frederick A. Gaskins, widow of our Past Master and former Selectman of the Town of Milton, presented Macedonian Lodge with a new clock in 19S9 as a memorial to her late husband.

One of the more recent outstanding and unusual exemplifications of the Hiramic Legend took place in 1961 on March 28th. At that time we were visited by Manchester Lodge #73 of Manchester, Connecticut. Their Fellowcraft Club in costume and regalia performed the work consistent with Connecticut ritual on their own candidate.

In 1962 the Bible which had graced our altar for many years was retired. Mrs. George A. Canon, Jr., widow of our late Tyler, presented the Lodge with a Memorial Bible, in memory of Brother Canon. This was accepted following the Installation Ceremony that year. Later, Brother Jacob Borghols personally constructed and presented to the Lodge a beautiful case for the storage of this Bible when it was not upon the altar.

During our seventy-five years we have been visited by the Grand Masters on nine occasions. We have been honored by them through the appointment of seven of our Past Masters to the office of District Deputy Grand Master. We have at the present time twenty holders of the Veterans' Medal and of these Bro. William A. Huebener has been a member for 62 years, Brother Harry A. Hawkesworth for 61 years and Brother J. Harry Holmes for 60 years. Pray tell, what is the magic in the letter "H" for I note that in each instance their surnames begin with the letter "H".

We have one holder of the Joseph Warren Medal. The distinguished Chairman of our Diamond Jubilee Committee was Master of the Lodge during its Golden Anniversary. At the present time he is also President of the Milton Masonic Building Corporation. As such he conceived the idea of and became the moving force behind what you see here in the beautiful renovation of the second and third floors of this building as well as the entrance thereto. Additional plans are in the making.

1232 members have signed our By-Laws. Our largest year for membership was in 1924 with 569. Our present membership is 302.

We of the present generation in Macedonian Lodge enjoy the fruits of the labors of our founding fathers and their successors. All men of courage and determination, who safely overcame the problems which have beset the Lodge in its long history and have safely guided it to this night.

Once again, as it has been in the past, this Lodge is challenged.

Problems arise out of the fact that the numbers of new candidates in a changing society tend to be more than offset by a larger number of deaths among our members. Twenty-five years ago our numbers were 368. Tonight we are 302.

But in every challenge there is opportunity. We of the present generation in this Lodge are confident that we too can be men of courage and determination. We too can emulate our "Three Macedonians." We too can safely pass our Lodge into the hands of our successors.

CENTENARY HISTORY, MAY 1992

Please refer to page 301 of the 1967 Grand Lodge Proceedings for the history of the first 75 years of Macedonian Lodge.

On January 25, 1977 Wor. Kenneth P. Lodge appointed R. W. A. Ralph Durning Chairman of a committee to receive our own R. W. Charles E. Norton on his first visit as the District Deputy Grand Master of the Dorchester Fourth Masonic District. It was a great evening for Macedonian Lodge.

In early 1978 it became obvious that Macedonian Lodge would be wise to sell the Masonic Apartments at 60 Adams Street, Milton. The Lodge felt the natural pain of the divergent emotions of the heart versus the sobering business necessities dictated by the mind. The arrangements were made and the building sold. A search committee was organized, and on Tuesday, March 27, 1979 Macedonian Lodge held our first meeting at the Quincy Masonic Temple, 170 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts.

On May 27, 1980 R. W. James G. Buckley paid a Fraternal Visit to our Lodge. The visit was unexpected, the size of his suite larger than usual and the sidelines were full. A surprised Wor. Kenneth P. Lodge was presented the Joseph Warren Medal. The recipient assumed the East and left us all with a tremendous feeling - a feeling you understand if you know Ken and one that cannot be explained if you don't.

On October 23, 1984 Brother Donald Bradshaw presented an Electronic Organ which he had personally built to the Lodge. Brother Bradshaw served many years as our Organist and made the meeting a great delight. The contribution of an Organist is never appreciated until you have an evening without music. Bro. Bradshaw had an Organ selection at every meeting. A selection always written by a Brother. Don never missed a chance to announce the Composer's Name and Lodge.

Most Worshipful David Borden Richardson presented R.W. A. Ralph Durning his 50 year Medal on March 26, 1985 at our regular communication. To receive a 50 year award is great. To have been so active the entire 50 years is fantastic. Every man in the room knew R.W. Durning would remain just as active in the future. Finally, to have the Grand Master make the presentation in person was the icing on the cake.

Macedonian Lodge felt the move to the Quincy Masonic Temple was a good decision. We enjoyed the facilities and felt very much at home in our new surroundings. Yet we missed our furniture, altar and ornaments we had placed in storage when we moved from Milton. The Quincy Temple had an unfinished room on the third floor called Burgin Hall. It had been named after Brother Thomas Burgin, a distinguished Mason and a former Mayor of the City of Quincy. Permission from the Temple was obtained in early 1989 for us to construct a Lodge Room in Burgin Hall. The officers and members went right to the job. Wor. Henry Tiews designed and built a truly magnificent Arc in the East and our prized emblems were removed from storage and put in place. The formal dedication of our new Lodge was made in October of 1990 when Most Worshipful Albert Timothy Ames, Grand Master, dedicated our new Lodge Room. We all knew we were home. An outstanding feeling. We are all so thankful.

On January 22, 1990 Wor. Henry Tiews was presented the Joseph Warren Medal by R. W. Charles Buckley. Wor. Tiews was serving as the District Deputy Grand Secretary with R. W. Buckley as the District Deputy Grand Master. This association made the presentation all the nicer.

Well, we made it the first one hundred years. We've been told the first hundred years are the hardest. It's good to have the tough part behind us.

Macedonian Lodge has a spirit you can feel when you enter the room. We have an outstanding monthly attendance. The officers for our new Masonic Year are outstanding men. We currently have 94 members. The words of our Grand Master, Most Worshipful Edgar William Darling, ring clear. We need Quality not Quantity. That's Macedonian Lodge!

OTHER

  • 1894 (Participation in burial lot dedication, 1894-95)
  • 1896 (Participation in centennial of Union Lodge, 1896-130)
  • 1908 (Petition regarding release of jurisdiction, 1908-31)
  • 1939 (Petition to reduce fees declined, 1939-252)

EVENTS

25TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, JUNE 1917

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XII, No. 10, July 1917, Page 346:

The twenty-fifth Anniversary of the forming of Macedonian Lodge, Milton, Mass.. was celebrated with appropriate ceremony and social festivity beginning in the Lodge apartments, Tuesday evening, June 19, continuing on Saturday, June 23 with an excursion and dinner with Ladies and dancing at the Atlantic House, Nantasket Beach, and concluding with a church service in the First M. E. Church on Sunday, June 24th.

Grand Master Leon M. Abbott attended by Moses C. Plummer, Deputy Grand Master; William M. Farrington, Senior Grand Warden; Frederick W. Hamilton, Grand Secretary; Edward N. West, Grand Marshal; Frank M. Weymouth, District Deputy Grand Master of the Fourth District and Frank T. Taylor, past District Deputy Grand Master, was formally received and cordially welcomed at the Tuesday evening function, by Wor. Master W. Newton Harlow.

There were also present as guests, masters of many nearby lodges.

The guests having been, formally received, Worshipful Master Harlow made a brief address of welcome in which he said that cf the original 39 charter members of Macedonian Lodge, 17 are living. He paid a tribute to those who founded the lodge and carried it on successfully for a quarter of a century and called upon the young members to take up the work and carry it along as well.

Following a selection by the Shubert quartette, which sang at intervals during the evening, the historical address prepared by Past Master Edmund J. Carpenter was read. Mr. Carpenter was unable to be present and the address was read by Rev. A. A. Rideout, the chaplain.

The address stated that the idea of the ledge originated in a Masonic Club that used to meet in Milton Village and of which a leading spirit was Charles Breck. Grand Lodge looked with disfavor on the club and it was disbanded. Later an attempt was made to secure a charter for a lodge in Milton but Union Lodge of Dorchester objected and the plan was dropped far several years. Then it was revived and in 1892, through the assistance of Francis D. Dunbar of Canton, then District Deputy, a charter was obtained. The charter was granted by Richard Briggs, then Grand Master.

The name Macecdonian was selected in memory of three famous Milton Masons, who became known as the "Three Macedonians" through their untiring efforts in keeping Union Lodge of Dorchester intact during the anti-Masonic agitation from 1826 onward. These "Three Macedonians" were Thomas T. Wardsworth, Charles Breck and R. M. Todd and their pictures now hang in the Macedonian Lodge apartments, William H. Puffer was Master under dispensation and the lodge met in Fraternity Hall. One of the first initiates was Clarence Boylston, who later became Master. In 1892 a fire in Associates Building necessitated removal of the lodge for a time and it met in the Odd Fellows hall and in the Town Hall June 5, 1893, the lodge was chartered and Dr. Freeland D. Leslie became the first master. The lodge was formally constituted June 28, 1893 by Grand Master Briggs, that being one of the last official acts of his life. The lodge had 39 charter members. It has had 14 Masters, of whom 9 are living and has a membership of nearly 400.

One of the most interesting features of the evening was the presentation of gifts to the lodge and to members who have served it long and well in various capacities. Worshipful Master Harlow presented a picture of all the Past Masters, also a picture of the officers of 1917 and the officers of 1913-'14. H. Clifford Gallagher, who has been Treasurer since the lodge was founded, was presented a beautiful jewel emblematic of his office. Mr. Gallagher replied, thanking the lodge for the jewel and paying high tribute to the officers who have served the lodge in its twenty-five years of life.

Presentations also were made to Arthur W. Jenkins, secretary for thirteen years; James Spencer, tyler for seventeen years.

The roll-call of charter members showed eleven present of the seventeen who are living and to each of these the master presented a pin bearing the words, "Macedonian Lodge — Charter Member."

Grand Master Abbott conveyed to the members the hearty congratulations of Grand Lodge, which, he said, rejoices in the success of Macedonian Lodge through its first quarter century. He said that he attributed much of that success to the ready and willing efforts of what may be termed the lay members, who are content to help without holding office. He spoke of the great spread of Masonry in Massachusetts and stated that it is a great privilege to be a Mason now in a period when the fraternal spirit is so important in a world at odds. His address was inspired with patriotic spirit and devotion to Masonry.

A Henry Price Medal was presented by Grand Master Abbott to Brother Joseph E. Blake, one of the chartered members.

Following the address of the Grand Master the lodge was closed, and an excellent entertainment was given by the Shubert quartet and Charles T. Grilley, reader. The final event of the evening was a substantial luncheon for the members in Fraternity hall and for the Grand Lodge officers and other guests in rooms on the floor below.

PRESENTATION, JANUARY 1921

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XVI, No. 4, January 1921, Page 111:

A bronze tablet, bearing the names of eighty-seven members of Macedonian Lodge of Masons, Milton, who served in the military and naval forces of the country during the World War, was unveiled Wednesday evening, January 5th, in the Masonic apartments in Associates Building. About three hundred members of the lodge and ladies were present, including relatives of those whose names are upon the tablet. The lodge has a membership of 495 and the large percentage of soldiers and sailors w'as commented upon by Past Grand Master Leon M. Abbott, the principal speaker, who said that he knew of no lodge in Massachusetts with an equal record.

A special tribute was paid to the memory of the three members whose names are on the tablet but who have died. Leslie A. Moore and Fred C. Gilpatric, Jr., died in service and Reuben Swan died only recently. Worshipful Master Charles F. Spargo read the roll of these departed members, while the whole audience stood, and taps was sounded by a bugler.

Worshipful Master Spargo presided and the past Grand Master, accompanied by Past Grand Marshal Edward N. West, was received by the officers of Macedonian Lodge with full ceremony. After the singing of the Star Spangled Banner, led by the Harvard Quartet, the tablet, which occupies a prominent place on the wall to the right of the Master's chair, was unveiled by Jedediah Strangman of Post 102, G. A. R.

The formal presentation was by Past Master W. Newton Harlow, who in a few graceful and well chosen words spoke of what the tablet, with its 87 names, represents in service to the country and to a great cause, also of what such service means in Masonry. He spoke feelingly of those who have died. Bro. Harlow stated that the tablet design was the work of Forrest E. Howes of Macedonian Lodge. The design is similar to that of the back of the master's chair and is characterized by beautiful simplicity. The tablet was formally accepted by Worshipful Master Spargo, who then read the honor roll of the warrior members who have died, after which Taps w'as sounded and the quartet sang.

Following the reading of the roll of the living upon the tablet, Bro. Spargo introduced Past Grand Master Abbott, who made one of his characteristic excellent addresses. He said that fully 8,000 Masons went into the armed forces of the nation from Massachusetts and he congratulated Macedonian Lodge upon having sent so large a proportion of its members, a record he said, probably not equalled by any other lodge in the State. The war, he said, has given Masonry great impetus and the fraternity has gained over 11,000 members in the past year in Massachusetts. He said that although the war is over the present situation, the threat to our civilization, calls for courage, if we are to preserve our ideals. Our standards, he said, are seriously menaced.

Following the ceremonies there was a program of songs and readings by the Harvard quartet and Miss Dorothy Carpenter, reader, after which there was a collation.

LODGE ROOM DEDICATION, SEPTEMBER 1989

From TROWEL, Spring 1990, Page 23:

Grand Master Dedicates New "Macedonian Lodge Room"

From Wor. Arthur Johnson, S. W. of Macedonian Lodge, acting in concert with R. W. Charles E. Norton, TROWEL rep., comes news of the dedication of the new Macedonian Lodge room in the Quincy Masonic Temple, Quincy, in the Dorchester 4th District, when Albert Timothy Ames, Grand Master, accompanied by a large and distinguished suite, performed the ancient ceremony of dedication before an impressive audience.

Wor. Henry Tiews, who served as Master in 1980-1981, was selected to represent the architect during the ceremony. Having designed and built the pillars and arch in the East to hold the original stained glass eblems of the Lodge, Wor. Tiews was a perfect choice.

The ceremony of dedication was artfully performed and proved enlightening for all in attendance. For many it was the first such ceremony they had ever witnessed. The writer stated, "Macedonian Lodge is grateful to our Grand Master, the District Deputy Grand Master, and all the participating Brethren for their participation in a unique occasion."

QuincyDedication1990.jpg
R. W. A. Ralph Duming, Presiding Master of the Lodge, presenting an honorarium to the Grand Master in honor of the event. (Photo credit: Harvard Studio)


GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

DISTRICTS

1892: District 4 (South Boston)

1911: District 4 (South Boston)

1927: District 4 (Dorchester)

2003: District 8


LINKS

Lodge web site

Massachusetts Lodges