Temple

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TEMPLE LODGE (EAST BOSTON / BOSTON)

Location: East Boston; Boston (1920)

Chartered By: William Sewall Gardner

Charter Date: 03/08/1871 1871-42

Precedence Date: 03/09/1870

Current Status: in Grand Lodge Vault; merged into Moses Michael Hays Lodge, 07/09/1985.


PAST MASTERS

  • John Garney, 1870, 1871
  • William Waters, Jr., 1872, 1873
  • Philander Nutter, 1874, 1875
  • Frank F. Sullivan, 1876, 1877
  • T. A. Hutchins, 1878, 1879
  • Andrew Hall, 1880, 1881; SN
  • Samuel Dilloway, Sr., 1882, 1883
  • George F. Hosea, 1884, 1885
  • N. D. Freeman, 1886, 1887
  • William E. Milk, 1888, 1889
  • James M. Simpson, 1890, 1891
  • Frank H. Parker, 1892, 1893; SN
  • William P. Treet, 1894, 1895
  • Joshua A. Story, 1896, 1897
  • George H. Libby, 1898, 1899
  • William H. Shannon, 1900, 1901
  • William E. Wyman, 1902, 1903
  • Herbert A. Libby, 1904, 1905
  • John M. Simpson, 1906, 1907
  • Austin C. Woodside, 1908, 1909
  • William E. Hancock, 1910, 1911
  • Guy L. Woodside, 1912, 1913
  • Herbert P. Cook, 1914, 1915
  • John K. Jones, 1916
  • Robert C. Beard, 1917, 1918
  • Henry A. MacDonald, 1919, 1920
  • George E. Marsters, 1921, 1922
  • Herbert V. Dykeman, 1923, 1924
  • Charles E. Johnson, 1925, 1926
  • James H. Powell, Jr., 1927, 1928
  • Owen B. Brigham, 1929, 1930
  • M. N. Abrahamson, 1931, 1932
  • Stephen D. Bacigalpo, 1933, 1934
  • Edwin Hansen, 1935, 1936
  • H. C. Berner, Jr., 1937, 1938
  • Louis Luftman, 1939, 1940
  • Harold M. Linsky, 1941, 1942; N
  • Harold E. Korelitz, 1943, 1944; N
  • Julius Stone, 1945, 1946
  • Albert J. Cohen, 1947, 1948
  • Julius Adelberg, 1949, 1950
  • David H. Bloom, 1951, 1952
  • Alrick B. Factoroff, 1953, 1954
  • Joseph L. Frank, 1955, 1956
  • Philip M. Stone, 1957, 1958
  • Alfred M. Simon, 1959, 1960
  • LeRoy M. Burston, 1961, 1962
  • Sidney B. Douglas, 1963, 1964
  • Gerald H. Lepler, 1965, 1966
  • Gerald Cabbit, 1967, 1968
  • Sanford Bernstein, 1969, 1970
  • Melvin Farmelant, 1971, 1972
  • Joseph B. Jacobson, 1973, 1974
  • Harry M. Shuman, 1975, 1976
  • Paul Silverstein, 1977, 1978
  • Gerald Raphel, 1979, 1980
  • Robert S. Goldman, 1981, 1982
  • Moses Winer, 1983-1985

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1945 (75th Anniversary)
  • 1971 (Centenary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1873 1876 1878 1882 1883 1885 1889 1894 1895 1912 1916 1919 1920 1921 1923 1924 1925 1927 1931 1932 1939 1940 1942 1945 1946 1949 1951 1952 1958 1974

HISTORY

  • 1945 (75th Anniversary History, 1945-490; see below)
  • 1971 (Centenary History, 1971-193; see below)

75TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, DECEMBER 1945

From Proceedings, Page 1945-490:

By Brother Felix E. Dine and Worshipful Maurice N.Abrahamson.

It was the year 1870 and the place, Noddle's Island — that Island across the harbor which is now called East Boston. This was a revolutionary period in history, for the combined German armies had been sweeping across France, overrunning her fortified cities, and after the fall of Paris, crowned the Kaiser Emperor of Greater Germany — and this on French soil. Even on our own soil there were differences between the North and South, with the Ku Klux Klan terrorizing the negro. Fenians in America were jeopardizing our peace with England by attempting to invade Canada over the boundary of the State of Vermont. Right here in Boston there was turmoil created over the women's suffrage issue, where there was a convention presided over by the sainted Julia Ward Howe.

In the spirit of the time, when change was in the air, a group of Masons, mostly sea captains and other seafaring men, headed by John Garney, William Waters and Philander Nutter, decided that a new Lodge of Masons in East Boston was necessary.

To select a name for this new Lodge, a committee was formed. Several names were presented, but the one which had unanimous approval, was the name "Temple," after the famous Temple family of Noddle's Island. Sir Thomas Temple, who first came to New England in 1657, was the owner of the Island. He traced his ancestry to one of the Knights Templar or Crusaders who compelled King John of England to sign the Magna Charta. Sir John Temple was born on Noddle's Island in 1731. He was the first Consul General from England to the United States after the peace of 1783, and for some years after 1785 he was the medium of communication from that Government to our own, while Great Britain had no minister to this country. He died in New York City in 1798, and a tablet to his memory was placed in the chancel of St. Paul's Church in that city.

On March 9, 1870, a dispensation was given by the Grand Lodge authorizing the institution of Temple Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of East Boston. On April 1, 1870, the first meeting of Temple Lodge was held in Washington Hall in the Winthrop Block. On March 8, 1871, our Charter was received, and in Boston, March 15, 1871, Temple Lodge was duly constituted by Most Worshipful William Sewall Gardner, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, who concluded his remarks with these words on our choice of the name "Temple": "Thus brethren you have preserved in your new lodge the name of a family most intimately associated with this island on which you are located, honored and respected in history and worthy of remembrance."

Having no jewels of its own, Mount Tabor Lodge, which met in the same hall, loaned its jewels, and with [http://www.masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=Hammatt Hammatt} Lodge, gave the necessary instruction and assistance to launch this seafaring men's lodge on its Masonic career. Thus commenced a bond of friendship which Temple Lodge continued as it progressed through the pages of history.

Temple Lodge continued to hold its meetings in Washington Hall, East Boston, regularly, conferred degrees, and these men of the sea conducted themselves with the reverence and sincerity that Masonry, like religion, deserved.

Because of the condition of the meeting hall, and because of changing character of its membership from men of the sea and ships to merchants, trades and professional men, etc. of Boston, Temple Lodge removed its quarters to the beautiful and spacious Corinthian Hall in the Masonic Temple, Boylston and 'Fremont Streets, Boston. The first meeting was held September 21, 1921, previous to which its Charter had been changed to read "Boston" instead of "East Boston."

The Masters of Temple Lodge, A. F. & A. M., have for the most part been men of character, modest and unassuming, yet strong in their Masonic ideals,fervent in their ritualistic duties, uncompromising with error and transgression. Those who have served the Lodge as its Worshipful Master as are follows: Wor. R.W,

  • Wor. John Garney, 1870-71
  • Wor. William Waters, Jr., 1872-73
  • Wor. Philander Nutter, 1874-75
  • Wor. Frank E. Sullivan, 1876-77
  • Wor. T. A. Hutchins, 1878-79
  • R. W. Andrew Hall, 1880-81
  • Wor. Samuel Dillaway, Sr., 1882-83
  • Wor. George F. Hosea, 1884-85
  • Wor. N. D. Freeman, 1886-87
  • Wor. Wm. E. Milk, 1888-89
  • Wor. James M. Simpson, 1890-91
  • R. W. Frank H. Parker, 1892-93
  • Wor. Wm. P. Treet, 1894-95
  • Wor. Joshua A. Story, 1896-97
  • Wor. George H. Libby, 1898-99
  • Wor. Wm. H. Shannon, 1900-01
  • Wor. Wm. E. Wyman, 1902-03
  • Wor. Herbert A. Libby, 1904-05
  • Wor. John M. Simpson, 1906-07
  • Wor. Austin C. Woodside, 1908-09
  • Wor. Wm. E. Hancock, 1910-11
  • Wor. Guy L. Woodside, 1912-13
  • Wor. Herbert P. Cook, 1914-15
  • Wor. John K. Jones, 1916
  • Wor. Robert C. Beard, 1917-18
  • Wor. Henry A. Macdonald, 1919-20
  • Wor. George E. Marsters, 1921-22
  • Wor. Herbert V. Dykeman, 1923-24
  • Wor. Charles E. Johnson, 1925-26
  • Wor. James H. Powell, Jr., 1927-28
  • Wor. Owen D. Brigham, 1929-30
  • Wor. Maurice N. Abrahamson, 1931-32
  • Wor. Stephen D. Bacigalupo, 1933-34
  • Wor. Edwin Hansen, 1935-36
  • Wor. H. C. Bernner, Jr., 1937-38
  • Wor. Louis Luftman, 1939-40
  • Wor. Harold M. Linsky, 1941-42
  • Wor. Harry E. Korelitz, 1943-44
  • Wor. Julius Stone, 1945

Two of these Masters only in our seventy-five years of history have been honored by our Most Worshipful Grand Masters of Masons in Massachusetts and selected as District Deputy Grand Masters for the Third Masonic District. Right Worshipful Andrew Hall in 1884-85 and Right Worshipful Dr. Frank H. Parker in 1898-99. Both of these men distinguished themselves and honored the name of Temple Lodge wherever their duties carried them. The name of Right Worshipful Dr. Frank H. Parker is long to be remembered, not only in Temple Lodge, but in medical history as well, for his service to mankind in alleviating and ministering to those afflicted with leprosy. Dr. Parker, with his wife acting as a nurse, carried on this important work and duties on the isolated and small islands of Penikese, off Buzzards Bay, which was the leper colony for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. There he and his wife lived among them and carried on his work which was renowned throughout the world. Dr. Parker not only treated the leper victims as their doctor, but he was a friend to them, gave of his money, his time, and finally his life, that their lives might have a spark of light from a society which cast them aside.

The membership of Temple Lodge changed considerably from its original founders. The membership rolls grew steadily. It became a cosmopolitan group. It was one of the first in Massachusetts Masonic history to be composed of so many different sects, religions and opinions, and because of this, it has been so popular. Even the regular communications changed from one of only working degrees to the spreading of Masonic ideals and good fellowship in the community. Through our funds and services, we give liberally of our time and money that the underprivileged, the aged, and the wounded and service men of this war may enjoy a few precious hours of peace and enjoyment. In 1932 Most Worshipful Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, Curtis Chipman, cited Temple Lodge and its Master, Worshipful Maurice N. Abrahamson and Brother Philip Fox for meritorious achievement in behalf of the residents of the Masonic Home in Charlton, Massachusetts. In the lodge-room a true spirit of Masonry prevails. A broader foundation is being laid with brotherly love, patriotism and humility to God.

The Lodge has been the recipient of many contributions to its several philanthropic funds from its members, including that by will of our late Brother Simon M. Daniels, who was Junior Warden in 1933.

The records of Temple Lodge show that our men fought bravely and with determination in our several wars for freedom and gave their lives that our Country, Masonry and Masonic Ideals, of which the four freedoms are a part, might survive and flourish.

If Right Worshipful Dr. Frank H. Parker were here now, after his usual story, in humble tone, he would undoubtedly say to us: "May your works be planned for wisdom, skill and in due proportions. May your foundations be laid firm and strong on a basis of truth and righteousness. May you ever act upon the square of equity, keep within the compass of reason, plumb your actions with the weight of conscience, walk perpendicularly in the line of duty and level your passions and affections to the rule of sobriety and virtue. May you finally be introduced to the temple of God above and be members of that holy society of brethren and friends where light, love, peace and joy shall reign in perfection, where your labors shall be your pleasures and your existence one eternal festival of joy. As you have in the past, may you continue to act in the future, with the blessings of God for the brotherhood of man."

I will conclude with repeating what I said in a telegram to the Lodge on its recent ladies' night: "Congratulations Temple Lodge A. F. & A. M. on its Diamond anniversary and best wishes for a glorious future."

CENTENARY HISTORY, APRIL 1971

From Proceedings, Page 1971-193:

By Brother Felix E. Dine and Worshipful David H. Bloom.

Eighteen seventy was a vibrant and militant time, with the combined German armies sweeping across France, crushing fortified cities, capturing Paris and adding humiliation by crowning the Kaiser, Emperor of Greater Germany on French soil. Turbulence eddied across America too. The Ku Klux Klan was reversing the Civil War by terrorizing the Negro; Fenians attempted to provoke England by attacking Canada through Vermont. Boston shuddered and suffered while Julia Ward Howe presided over a women's suffrage convention.

And in Noddle's Island, that island across the harbor now called East Boston, changes, modest to be sure, but changes of significance to us, occurred. Masonry, the ancient craft was expanding its precepts rapidly. A group of Masons, mostly sea captains and sailors headed by John Garney, William Waters and Philander Nutter recognized the need for a new Lodge in their Island.

A committee was formed to select a name for this new Lodge. Of the several considered, unanimous approval was given to the suggestion of honoring the Island's original owners, the Temple family. Sir Thomas Temple, who first came to New England in 1657, was the owner of the Island. He traced his ancestry to one of the Knights Templar, or Crusaders, who compelled King John of England to sign the Magna Carta.

Sir John Temple, born on Noddle's Island in 1731, was the first Consul General from England to the United States after the peace of 1783. For some years after 1785, while Great Britain had no minister to this country, he was the medium of communication from that Government to our own. He died in New York City in 1798, and a tablet to his memory was placed in the chancel of Saint Paul's Church in that City.

On March 9, 1870, a dispensation was given by the Grand Lodge authorizing the institution of Temple Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of East Boston. On April 1, 1870 the first meeting of Temple Lodge was held in Washington Hall in the Winthrop Block. On March 8, 1871 our charter was received and in Boston, March 15, 1871 Temple Lodge, A. F. & A. M. was duly constituted by the Most Worshipful William Sewall Gardner, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, who concluded his remarks with these words on the choice of the Temple name: "Thus, Brethren, you have preserved in your new Lodge the name of a family most intimately associated with the island on which you are located, honored and respected in history, and worthy of remembrance". (1871 Mass. 46-50)

Mount Tabor Lodge which met in the same hall loaned its jewels, and with Hammatt Lodge gave the necessary instruction and assistance to launch this seafaring men's Lodge on its Masonic voyage. Thus commenced a bond of friendship with Temple Lodge which has continued through the years.

Temple Lodge continued to hold its meetings at Washington Hall, East Boston and regularly conferred degrees. These men of the sea conducted themselves with the reverence and sincerity that exemplifies Masonry.

The deteriorated condition of the meeting hall and the changing character of its membership, from seamen to merchants, tradesmen and professional men from Boston, prompted Temple Lodge to remove its quarters to the beautiful and spacious Corinthian Hall of the Masonic Temple on Boylston and Tremont Streets, Boston. The first meeting was held September 21, 1921 (previous to which its charter had been changed to read "Boston" instead of "East Boston".)

The Masters of Temple Lodge, chosen for their strong Masonic ideals, have been modest and unassuming yet fervent in their ritualistic duties. Four of the Masters in our one hundred year history have been selected by the Grand Masters for the District Deputy Grand Masters for the Boston Third Masonic District: Right Worshipful Andrew Hall, Right Worshipful Dr. Frank H. Parker, Right Worshipful Harold M. Linsky and Right Worshipful Harry E. Korelitz. All of these men distinguished themselves and honored the name of Temple Lodge wherever their duties carried them.

The name Rt. Wor. Dr. Frank H. Parker is prominent, not only ii. Temple Lodge, but in medical history as well, for his services to mankind in ministering to and alleviating those afflicted with leprosy. Dr. Parker, with his wife acting as a nurse, carried on this important work on the small island of Penikese off Buzzards Bay, which was the leper colony for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. There he and his wife lived among lepers earning renown throughout the world. Dr. Parker not only was a Doctor, but a friend to the lepers, giving of his money, his time and finally his life that their lives might have a spark of light from a society which isolated them.

In 1932, The Most Worshipful Grand Master, Curtis Chipman, cited Temple Lodge, its Master, Worshipful Maurice N. Abrahamson and Bro. Philip Fox for meritorious achievement in behalf of the residents of the Masonic Home in Charlton, Massachusetts.

At the Seventy-fifth Anniversary celebration of the Lodge, we were honored by the presence of the Most Worshipful Grand Master who presided in the East with his full suite of Grand Lodge officers at the several stations. (1945 Mass. 488-494) Temple Lodge pioneered in promoting interesting meetings such as Bench and Bar, Brotherhood, Father and Sons and Daughters, and other eventful evenings which attracted huge attendance.

Our initial Bench and Bar meeting in 1946, included among the participants no less than three Past Grand Masters of Massachusetts: Most Worshipful Samuel Wragg, Most Worshipful Arthur Coolidge and Most Worshipful Albert Schaefer 33°, as well as Supreme Court Acting Chief Justice William Burns, and Boston Municipal Court Justice Davis Keniston.

The Lodge has been fortunate to have welcomed as guests many famous and celebrated personalities, including Lt. Col. Frank B. Wallis, a chief prosecutor at the Nuremburg trials after World War II; Cedric Foster, the "Connecticut Yankee" radio commentator; Dr. Frederick May Eliot, President of the American Unitarian Association; Erwin D. Canham of the Christian Science Monitor; our own member Max R. Grossman of the U.S. Information Service, who recited his interesting experiences while on duty abroad; Maxwell M. Rabb, Secretary to President Eisenhower's Cabinet; Dr. Harold R. Case, President of Boston University; Frank W. Buxton, member of the Anglo-American Commission of Inquiry on Palestine and Pierre Van Paassen, the noted author.

During the years, Temple Lodge has been honored by the Grand Lodge of the State of Israel. In 1954 the Grand Master of Israel visited our Lodge and presented honorary membership in their Lodge to Wor. Julius Stone. Later Grand Master M. Max Seligman and his Deputy Grand Master, M. Max Silverstone accompanied by his Grand Secretary, Right Worshipful Shlomo Zarakin, came to our Lodge at which time the Grand Master of Israel was made an Honorary Member of Temple Lodge. He then presented to Wor. Julius Stone a medal from the Grand Lodge of Israel. Bro. A. Nathan Caplan and Thomas Black accompanied Wor. Julius Stone to Israel and assisted in the presentation of a Paul Revere Bowl to the Grand Lodge of the State of Israel at a Special Communication in Jerusalem.

Temple Lodge proudly assisted in the constitution of Mount Sinai Lodge in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1946 and presented Jewels and Regalia to the newly instituted Lodge. Several Lodge activities have reflected credit on us. Fraternal visits were made to Wellfleet, Massachusetts and Westbrook, Maine.

where our officers joined in the raising of candidates in their Lodges. The Blood Bank program of the Lodge has received a citation for excellence from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. A Memorial to Temple Lodge members who participated in World War II was established at the Kiddie Kamp in Sharon, Massachusetts. In 1950 the Lodge established an Educational Loan Fund for the benefit of the children of members. This fund has assisted several to obtain collegiate training.

Among the various social activities for the entertainment ol our Temple Lodge members and their families have been interesting "Mystery Rides", week end get togethers in New Hampshire, Vermont and New York State. Table Lodge meetings and Salutes to various community active Temple Lodge members, which all serve to promote fellowship.

The Masters responsible for the success of Temple Lodge during the past twenty-five years are: Worshipful Brothers Albert J. Cohen, Julius Adelberg, David H. Bloom, Arlick B. Factoroff, Joseph L. Frank, Philip M. Stone, Alfred M. Simon, LeRoy M. Burston, Sidney B. Douglas, Gerald H. Lepler, Gerald Cabitt and Sanford Bernstein.

The records of Temple Lodge show that our men fought bravely and with honor in our several wars for freedom and gave their lives that our Country, Masonry and Masonic ideals might survive.

OTHER

  • 1918 (Petition to remove to Boston jurisdiction refused, 1918-444)
  • 1920 (Jurisdiction changed to Boston, 1920-571)

GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

OTHER BROTHERS


EVENTS

INSTALLATION, DECEMBER 1877

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. I, No. 10, January 1878, Page 318:

At a special meeting of Temple Lodge of A. F. and A. M., held at Masonic Hall, Central Square, East Boston, Friday evening, December 28, the following officers were publicly installed by R. W. Bro. Seth C. Ames, D. D. G. M. of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, assisted by W. Bro. Martin M. Hancock as Grand Marshal: Worshipful Master, Thomas Austin Hutchins; Senior Warden, Frank E. Pray; Junior Warden, Andrew Hall; Treasurer, Nathaniel T. Gorham; Secretary, Horace B. Butler; Chaplain, Rev. Selden Gilbert; Marshal, William E. Cannon; Senior Deacon, Samuel Dillaway, 3d; Junior Deacon, William H. Clay; Senior Steward, Luther E. Kimball; Junior Steward, George H. Carver; Inside Sentinel, Jerome W. Bartlett; Tyler, Philander Nutter.

The ceremony of installation being completed, W. Brother Frank E. Sullivan was presented with an elegant Past Master's Jewel, by W. Brother Wyzeman Marshall. W. Brother Sullivan responded in a very neat and appropriate manner, thanking the Lodge for the beautiful token, and also for the unanimous support given him by the officers and members of Temple Lodge during his term of office.

After the ceremony of the evening was completed the Brethren of the Lodge, with their lady friends, repaired to the banquet ball, where lay spread a bountiful collation prepared by Brother Tufts.

After the wants of the inner man had been substantially supplied, the balance of the evening was spent in listening to speeches from W. Brothers Parkman, Ames, Dadmun, Marshall and others, and some very fine selections by the Masonic Quartette, consisting of Brothers William Beeching, C. Cheney, C.J. Hobbs, and C. H. Webb.

This concluded the ceremony of the fourth Public Installation of Temple Lodge.

INSTALLATION, JANUARY 1880

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. III, No. 11, February 1880, Page 349:

Temple Lodge was chartered in 1871, with fifty-two charter members, and now has one hundred and four. Five of the charter members have died. It has five Past Masters, all living, and fourteen Past Masters were present on the occasion when we had the pleasure of attending the installation of the officers, on the evening of January 20th. We enjoyed the easy and fraternal manner in which the retiring Master. Thomas A. Hutchins, conducted the ceremonies, Bro. W. B. Cannon assisting as Marshal. Bro. Hutchins was the recipient of a very handsome Past Master's gold jewel. The speeches incident to the presentation were brief, but characterized by the good will and harmony which prevail in this well-conducted Lodge. A collation followed, at which the new Master, Bro.\ Hall, presided with ease and ability. Speeches by a number of brethren enlivened the occasion, and it was quite evident that none went away dissatisfied.

The following is the list of officers for 1880: Andrew Hall, W. M.; Jotham E. Munroe, S. W.; Samuel Dillaway, 3d, J. W.; Nathaniel T. Gorham, Treasurer: Horace B. Butler, Secretary; William E. Cannon, Marshal; Rev. William H. Munroe, Chaplain; James W. Currier, S. D.; Luther K. Kimball, J. D.; George E. Sargent, S. S.; William A. Newhouse, J. S.; Naphtali D. Freeman, I. S.; Philander Nutter, Tyler. Conmmittee on Charity, Andrew Hall, J. E. Munroe, Samuel Dillaway, 3d, T. A. Hutchins, F. E. Sullivan.

INSTALLATION, DECEMBER 1880

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. IV, No. 10, January 1881, Page 319:

At a special communication of Temple Lodge, A. F. and A. M., held at Masonic Hall, Thursday evening, Dec. 23d, the following officers were duly installed by W. Bro. T. Austin Hutchins: Andrew Hall, W. M.; Samuel Dilloway, Jr., S. W.; George F. Hosea, J. W.; N. T. Gorham, Treasurer; H. B. Butler, Secretary; N. D. Freeman, S. D.; W. E. Milk, J. D.; Rev. W. H. Monroe, Chaplain; J. W. Bartlett, Marshal; S. I. Crafts, S. S.; W. H. Bertram, J. S.; Sidney Peterson, I. S.: P. Nutter, Tyler. After the installation the members of the Lodge and invited guests retired to the dining hall and partook of a banquet prepared by Bro. Hutchinson.

INSTALLATION, DECEMBER 1881

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. V, No. 10, January 1882, Page 317:

At a special Communication of Temple Lodge, A. F. and A. M., held at Masonic Hall, East Boston, Thursday evening, December 22d, the following officers were duly installed by W. Bro. Andrew Hall, assisted by W. Bro. William Waters, Jr., acting as Marshal: Samuel Dillaway, Jr., W. M.; George F. Hosea, S. W.; N. D. Freeman, J. W.; Nathaniel T. Gorham, Treasurer; Horace B. Butler, Secretary; E.J. Sheldon. Chaplain; J. W. Bartlett, Marshal; William E. Milk, S. D.; William A. Newhouse, J. D.; Samuel I. Crafts, S. S.; William H. Bertram, J. S.; S. Peterson, I. S.; W. Bro. P. Nutter, Tyler.

After the ceremony of installation was completed W. Bro. Frank E. Sullivan, in a very appropriate manner, in behalf of Temple Lodge, presented to W. Bro. Andrew Hall, the retiring Master, a beautiful Past Master's jewel. The exercises of the evening being now completed, W. Bro. Hall called the officers who had served under him to approach him, and in a very feeling manner thanked each of them personally for their services in assisting him in the duties of the Lodge, after which the brethren retired to the banquet hall and partook of refreshments.

INSTALLATION, DECEMBER 1914

From New England Craftsman, Vol. X, No. 4, January 1915, Page 140:

TempleLodge.jpg

A Public Installation of Officers and "Ladies Night" of notable interest was conducted by Temple Lodge, East Boston, Wednesday, December 30. About 200 were in the company among whom was Grand Master Melvin M. Johnson who was accompanied by Grand Master William D. MacPherson of Canada.

These two distinguished guests were escorted to the East by a committee of all the past masters of the lodge present with Past Grand Warden W. H. H. Soule and District Deputy Grand Master Charles G. Bird. As the procession advanced to the east the orchestra complimented the Canadian grand master by playing "God Save the King" and it was noticed that the Stars and Stripes and Union Jack held a conspicuous place in the hall. Grand Master Johnson made allusion to this in his reply to the greeting from the mMster and said it indicated that Masonry knew no distinction among countries. He also stated that it was the first time the Grand Master of Canada was ever in a Massachusetts subordinate lodge.

The exercises of the evening begun with an informal reception at 7.30. The installation ot officers was at 8 o'clock. Banquet at 9.30 which was followed by a musical entertainment and readings. The souvenir program was a handsome production and was embellished with a group picture of the members of the lodge in miniature size, surrounding a icture of the Wor. Master in somewhat larger size.

The installation was conducted by Past Grand Warden William H. H. Soule with Past Master William H. Reid as Marshal.

During 1915 the organization will be Herbert P. Cook, WM; John K. Jones, SW; Robert C. Beard, JW; George H. Libby (PM), T; J. H. Powell, S; Rev. Charles J. Jones, C; Frank F. H. Chipman, AC; William A. Maxwell, M; Henry A. Macdonald, SD; Arthur E. Collins, J. D; George E. Marsters, SS; Kyrle L. Bellew, JS; Herbert V. Dykeman, Sentinel; J. Henry Ripley, Organist; William A. Newhouse, Tyler.


DISTRICTS

1870: District 3 (Boston Highlands)

1883: District 3 (East Boston)

1911: District 3 (East Boston)

1927: District 3 (Boston)


LINKS

Massachusetts Lodges