Republican

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REPUBLICAN LODGE

Location: Greenfield; Gill (1821); Greenfield (1851)

Chartered By: Paul Revere

Charter Date: 01/09/1795 II-60

Precedence Date: 12/08/1794

Current Status: Active


NOTES

According to the 150th Anniversary history (Page 1945-370), the charter was surrendered in 1833.

MEMBER LIST, 1802

From Vocal Companion and Masonic Register, Boston, 1802, Part II, Page 13:

  • R. W. John Stone, M.
  • W. William Wait, S. W.
  • W. Lemuel Foster, J. W.
  • Calvin Munn, Tr.
  • Elijah Alvord, 2d., Sec.

No. of Members, 71.

  • Moses Bascomb, Jr.
  • Caleb Chapin
  • Procter Pierce
  • Francis Wood
  • Appleton Skinner
  • Samuel Ross
  • Daniel Arncraft
  • Dudley Fish
  • Richard Wells
  • Stalham Williams

PAST MASTERS

  • John Long, Jr., 1795-1797
  • John Stone, 1798-1800
  • William Wait, 1801
  • Lemuel Foster, 1802-1805
  • Elijah Alvord, 1806, 1808-1811; SN
  • John Wells, 1807
  • Hooker Leavit, 1812, 1813
  • James Gould, 1814
  • Titus Strong, 1815, 1816, 1819
  • Franklin Ripley, 1817
  • George Grinnell, Jr., 1818
  • Ansel Phelps, 1820, 1821; SN
  • Josiah W. Cannon, 1822, 1823
  • John Pinks, 1824
  • Bethuel Slate, 1825-1827, 1829-1832
  • DARK 1833-1851
  • John A. Gamber, 1852, 1853; SN
  • Charles Mattoon, 1854; SN
  • Edward P. Graves, 1855, 1856; SN
  • George Ripley, 1857
  • Wendell T. Davis, 1858-1860
  • Joshua Thornley, 1861
  • David Lyon, 1862-1864
  • George A. Kimball, 1865
  • Willard T. Leonard, 1866
  • Bowdoin S. Parker, 1867, 1868, 1873; Mem
  • George Wilby, 1869, 1870
  • Edward J. Rice, 1871
  • Franklin Brown, 1872
  • Charles H. McClellan, 1874-1876
  • Henry L. Miller, 1877, 1878
  • James R. Long, 1879-1881
  • Gorham D. Williams, 1882, 1883
  • Anson Withey, 1884, 1885
  • Wyatt A. Fowler, 1886, 1887
  • Franklin E. Snow, 1888, 1889
  • Eugene B. Blake, 1890, 1891
  • Dana Malone, 1892, 1893
  • Charles A. Wheeler, 1894, 1895
  • Edwin R. Fiske, 1896, 1897
  • William B. Allen, 1898, 1899
  • Peter Voorhees Finch, 1900, 1901 Mem
  • George W. Forbes, 1902, 1903
  • Charles J. Fisk, 1904, 1905
  • Louis A. Cook, 1906, 1907
  • G. Harry Kaulback, 1908, 1909; SN
  • John M. Hackley, 1910
  • John B. Clark, 1911
  • Jacob E. Schuler, 1912
  • Frederick L. Haywood, 1913
  • D. Rollin Alvord, 1914, 1915
  • Arthur L. Staples, 1916
  • George K. Pond, 1917
  • Charles E. Smart, 1918, 1919
  • Albert G. Hawks, 1920
  • Francis H. Maxwell, 1921
  • Hector M. MacDonald, 1922
  • Ward C. Bryant, 1923
  • Frank A. Yeaw, 1924, 1925; SN
  • Hiram D. Phillips, 1926
  • Charles S. Tinkham, 1927
  • Earle N. W. Kellogg, 1928
  • Maurice J. Levy, 1929, 1930
  • Frank H. Reed, Jr., 1931, 1932; N
  • John B. Roys, 1933
  • Leon W. Graham, 1934, 1935
  • George W. Carpenter, 1936
  • Cyril B. Raymond, 1937
  • Roy D. Peterson, 1938
  • Lester J. Clapp, 1939
  • Leland M. Cairns, 1940
  • Harold C. Zeiner, 1941, 1942
  • George R. Wilcox, 1943; SN
  • John A. Ross, 1944
  • James H. Pierson, 1945
  • Harold W. Phillips, 1946, 1947
  • Charles J. Hampshire, 1948
  • Philip D. Adams, 1949, 1950
  • John R. Moseley, 1951
  • Leland J. Stiles, 1952
  • Herbert H. Maynard, 1953
  • Norman B. Quick, 1954
  • Edward F. Stange, 1955, 1994, 1995; SN
  • George F. Berry, 1956
  • Monroe E. Smith, 1957; N
  • Warren O. Weir, 1958
  • Louis A. Kramer, 1959
  • Charles G. Campbell, 1960
  • Carlos T. Renfew, 1961
  • Norman W. Whitcomb, Jr., 1962; SN
  • William B. Buck, 1963
  • Alfred D. Varley, 1964
  • James O. S. Graves, 1965
  • H. Richard Spooner, 1966
  • James D. Avery, 1967
  • Samuel J. Yeager, Jr., 1968, 1969
  • Earle Tucker, 1970
  • Vernon M. Miller, 1971
  • Francis O. Hall, 1972
  • Burleigh M. H. Brown, 1973
  • Edmond D. Harrison, 1974 DD
  • Alan F. Bristol, 1975
  • Ralph W. Semb, 1976, 1977, 1979
  • Thomas H. Heinig, 1978
  • Donald A. Leger, 1980, 1981
  • Theron W. Floran, 1982, 1983
  • Thomas J. Specht, 1984, 1985
  • Russell P. Kimball, 1987, 1992, 1993
  • Lawrence G. Kent, 1988, 1996; PDDGM
  • Donald J. McKinnon, 1989
  • Ronald P. Croteau, 1990
  • Matthew A. Gaines, 1991
  • Douglas M. Finn, 1997, 2002
  • Robert C. Brooks, 1998
  • Derwood R. Tyler, 1999, 2000
  • David E. Finn, 2001
  • James R. Vassar, 2003, 2004, 2010
  • Douglas C. Finn, 2005, 2006; DDGM
  • Kenneth E. Handfield, Jr., 2008
  • Thomas B. McHugh, 2009

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Charter: 1794
  • Petition for Restoration of Charter: 1851

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1895 (Centenary)
  • 1945 (150th Anniversary)
  • 1970 (175th Anniversary)
  • 1995 (200th Anniversary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1870 1871 1873 1877 1879 1881 1882 1889 1907 1910 1914 1916 1920 1923 1928 1951 1957 1963 1975 1977 1982 1983 1986 1999 2003 2004 2005 2007 2008 2009 2010 2012 2014

HISTORY

  • 1895 (Centenary historical address not in Proceedings)
  • 1945 (150th Anniversary History, 1945-361; see below)
  • 1970 (175th Anniversary History, 1970-4; see below)
  • 1995 (200th Anniversary History, 1995-3; see below)

150TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, NOVEMBER 1945

From Proceedings, Page 1945-361:

By Worshipful Malcolm Butement.

The history of Republican Lodge may well be divided into four periods. Twenty-five years of earnest and anxious struggle, thirty years of censure, misfortune and decadence, twenty years of restoration and seventy-five years of successful organization and achievement.

Previous to 1794, the institution of Freemasonry had no organized body to represent it in Greenfield. The nearest Lodges were at Keene, New Hampshire, and Worcester, Massachusetts. Accordingly, a few Freemasons living in Greenfield and vicinity, feeling the need of closer Masonic ties, took the first steps for forming a Lodge in Greenfield by petitioning Rising Sun Lodge of Keene to intercede with the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge at Boston for a dispensation to form a new Lodge in the following manner:

Greenfield, Mass., August 24, A.L. 5794.

Worshipful Master, Worshipful Wardens and Worthy Brethren:

Fortune and chance had placed a few of us, of the Masonick Order, in this town, all of which have been authentically Initiated, Passed and Raised to the Sublime degree in the same, and Whereas, the distance from here to any lodge regularly constituted is so great, which renders our wishful inclinations as visitors, very inconvenient, without much loss of time and expense, and having the good of Masonry at heart, ever endeavoring for its promotion, together with the situation of this town, where members of the most respectable character are only waiting for a regular and due establishment of the same. We your sincere brothers crave your kind assistance, in recommending us to the Right Worshipful Grand Lodge in Boston, whereby we may with due submission, obtain a dispensation to open a new Lodge here.

Viewing the situation of this place, and the distance we are from any well constituted lodge, we flatter ourselves that your Worshipful Lodge will hold our wishes up in the clearest light and grant us that brotherly assistance which we crave.

We are, with due regard, your sincere brothers and very humble servants.

  • John Long, Jr., Esqr.
  • Wm. Grinnell
  • Amos Cornwell
  • Calvin Munn
  • Nodiah Kellogg
  • Calvin Johnson
  • Edward Houghton
  • Abel Wilder
  • Daniel Wilder
  • Eliphaz Alexander

To Major William Todd and the rest of the brethren of Rising Sun Lodge.

The petition was favorably recommended to the consideration of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts by Rising Sun Lodge, and at the quarterly communication of the same, held on December 8th, was granted.

In the January 15, 1795 issue of the Greenfield Gazette the following notice was printed:

To all Free and Accepted Masons:

Brethren:

You are hereby cordially invited to attend at Mr. Munn's in Greenfield, on Wednesday the 28th day of January, current, at which time and place will be constituted, in due form, a Lodge of Free Masons, by the name of "Republican Lodge." It is expected that the business will be performed by Brother Isiah Thomas, Seignor Grand Warden, and that a discourse will be delivered at the meeting house in Greenfield, to begin at 11 o'clock in the forenoon: After exercises the brethren are desired to repair to Mr. Munn's for refreshment, and perform the duties of the day.

John Long, jun.
Master
Greenfield, January 8, 1795.

On January 28th, 1795, the first meeting of Republican Lodge was held in Munn's Tavern which stood on the site of the present Mansion House. The nine officers and twenty-five brethren attended by "a very large concourse of gentlemen and ladies" then walked in procession to the Meeting House which was situated near the corner of Federal and Silver Streets.

There the Rev. Mr. Parsons of Amherst delivered a "well adapted sermon," taking for his text, "And the Lord make you to increase and abound in love, one toward another and toward all men even as we do toward you"; at the conclusion of which, the brethren repaired to Brother Munn's hall at the Tavern where the concluding service was held. Worshipful Brother Isaiah Thomas, Senior Grand Warden, installed the officers of the newly created Lodge and gave a Masonic oration. Worshipful Brother John Long, Jr. was the first Master.

The Charter of Republican Lodge is the first of the twenty-three charters signed by the Most Worshipful Grand Master Paul Revere and the precedence of the Lodge dates from January 9, 1795, while the Charter is dated February 7, 1795.

For a considerable time the regular communications of the Lodge were usually held at 2 p.m. The next succeeding being held on February 11th, and "Opened on the first step," as the record tersely expresses it, the usual business transacted, the refreshments partaken of and the Lodge closed in due form. The stewards' bills ranged from 4 s, 6 d, to £ 1, 6 d, for each meeting during the first few years.

The Brethren early became sincere devotees to the patron saints of Freemasonry and on the 24th of June, 1795, duly celebrated the Festival of St. John the Baptist. On this occasion, which forms the basis of subsequent observances of the kind, the Lodge as a body, marched in procession to the Meeting House and in the quaint language of the record, "listened to a well adapted sermon by the Rev. Roger Newton," after which they repaired to Bro. Munn's Hall and partook of the entertainment provided for the occasion, worked the 2nd and 3rd degrees, proposed two candidates and closed the Lodge. As this was the first festival observed by the Lodge, they seem to have thought it fitting to be unmindful of the steward, who, however, was not dilatory in bringing in a bill of £8, 11 s, 8 d.

The following year, 1796, the festival was again celebrated by another "well adapted sermon" and the addition of an oration. Mindful of the wily steward with his large bills, the Lodge resolved this year to circumvent him by passing a vote that "no guests, save the clergy," happy men, should be invited to the dinner. By this strategic vote the desired financial result was attained and the steward, poor fellow, was forced to content himself with a bill one-half that of the previous year.

Having now learned how to reduce expenses, the Lodge resolved in December to celebrate the anniversary of St. John, the Evangelist. This festival was carried out much the same as the preceding ones; a sermon, an oration, pronounced to be "truly elegant," and lastly, plenty to eat and drink. For the next thirty years these recurring festivals were celebrated with great regularity. The June festival being always observed and the December festival seldom omitted. This apparent partiality probably was due to a preference for the month of roses, rather than for the bleak winds and snows of December.

During the first year, a code of By-Laws was adopted. However, they seem to have been a source of much trouble and frequently were "dispensed" with in order to accomplish something they would not allow; such as receiving an application from, ballot on, and perhaps work all three degrees on a candidate at the same meeting. For the first few years committees were appointed frequently to alter or amend them. These By-Laws also contained specific rules of conduct and every member was instructed on his behavior both within and without the Lodge, that no unjust reflection might be cast on the "Royal Art."

Every brother was held accountable to the principles of Truth, Justice, Honesty and Charity. He who deviated from the path that is straight and narrow was quickly reminded of his error and brought before the Lodge for judgment. If the offense was of a serious nature, he was immediately brought to trial, judged with candor, admonished with friendship and reprehended with justice.

At the meeting held December 28, 1795, Elijah Alvord was "Initiated as Tyler and is to stand in that post for one year." At the next meeting, Bro. Alvord was "Passed and Raised to the Sublime."

"In the East there is Light in Republican Lodge held at Greenfield on the 9th day of November A.L. 5796" was the very expressive sentence at the beginning of the record of this meeting and was the opening sentence of the record of nearly every meeting until June 17, 1807.

In 1801, the Lodge procured a seal with the motto "Follow Reason." In commenting on this motto, Worshipful Brother Bowdoin S. Parker said, "Noble words, expressing at once the highest standard of moral action and the supreme arbiter of every motive in life" and that "No narrow, bigoted or unthinking minds could have chosen it."

The record of the meeting held March 1, 1797, is interesting. After listing the officers, the record says, "Visitors Bro. Lee, Bro. West, Bro. Clapp, Bro. Flagg. Lodge opened on the third step. Bro. Flagg raised to the Sublime degree and paid his fee to the Treasurer. Lodge closed on the third step. Lodge opened on the Mark Step by Bro. Lee, Bro. West and Bro. Smith. Brethren Marked: — Bro. Long, Bro. Cornwell, Bro. Stone, Bro. Waite, Bro. Munn, Bro. Gilbert, Bro. Wells, Bro. Graves, Bro. Ames, Bro. Clapp, Bro. Langdon. Steward Bill paid. Lodge closed on the fourth step by Worshipful Lee." The Bro. Smith was the Rev. Preserved Smith of Rowe, who was raised October 14, 1795. He was born in Ashfield, served in the Revolution and was a minister in Rowe for 35 years. Bro. Flagg, who received his third degree at this meeting had been admitted to membership in 1796 and Republican Lodge had been severely censured by the Grand Lodge for admitting a Fellow Craft to membership. As we have no records to identify Brothers Lee and West, they evidently were sent here to see that Bro. Flagg was properly healed.

During the early years the funds of the Lodge must have been rather meager, for at the October 11, 1797, meeting we find that a committee is "chosen to see that the money due the Grand Lodge be immediately forwarded and that hereafter there shall not be any notes given for passing or raising fees." Notes were taken to such an extent that they found themselves without funds. The first report for 1802 reads as follows:

  • Cash in the hands of Bro. Calvin Munn the Past Treasurer which has not yet been paid over to the Treasurer —$ 90.19
  • Notes on hand against several Bros, as reported December 28, 1801 —$418.60
  • Cash received by Treasurer since Settlement December 28, 1801 —| 17.49 1/2
  • Treas. charge against Lodge —$ 10.20
  • Available Funds — $7.29 1/2

On January 28, 1805, Republican Lodge performed its first funeral service and it was held at Shelburne for its first Master, Worshipful Brother Dr. John Long. In 1807, Brother Avery Williams was appointed Chaplain, being the first Brother honored with that office.

On the second Wednesday of December, 1802, Right Worshipful Brother Solomon Vose, District Deputy Grand Master, paid the first official visitation ever held in Republican Lodge. He was one of the first group of District Deputy Grand Masters appointed by the Grand Master "pursuant to the regulations of the Grand Lodge made and established on the 15th of December A.L. 5801." There were thirty Brethren present out of the total of 120 that had been initiated and received into membership up to that date. When we take into consideration the time of the year and the distance that many lived from the town, it was a large attendance. The Master lived in Deerfield, Senior Warden in Leyden, Treasurer in Northfield, Senior Deacon and Secretary in Shelburne, and members came from Bernardston, Rowe, Gill, Montague and Sunderland, as well as Greenfield. The District Deputy Grand Master lived in North-field, took his degrees in 1796 in Republican Lodge and had been Master of Harmony Lodge.

At about this time, the ritualistic work of the Lodge was evidently not too good for we find in the records of the 1801 annual meeting: "Voted that a committee be appointed to procure an able and respectable Mason at the expense of the Lodge to reside in this town a convenient time for the purpose of instructing the members of this Lodge in the Sublime Mysteries of Masonry." Apparently no one was secured until 1803, when in March it was voted "to pay Wor. Bro. Woodard ?3 and to present him with a copy of Bro. Harris Discourses for his service in instructing the Lodge." However, in 1806 the Lodge was receiving instruction from Bro. Benj. Gleason, Grand Lecturer, for the record reads: "Voted that the Treasurer pay Bro. Benj. Gleason, G.L. fifteen dollars for his services also that he pay Bro. Munn's bill for refreshments during the time Bro. Gleason visited this Lodge." How much the officers profited by the instruction is impossible to say. The Secretary is the only one we can judge and he certainly became more concise. Previously he wrote "The Lodge closed and to stand closed till our next regular communication unless called together sooner on some special occasion in which case the Lodge will have timely notice." He now says, "the Lodge closed in due form."

In 1808 many members dimitted and the membership was greatly reduced. It was proposed to remove the Lodge to Colrain, but after due deliberation, it was deemed inexpedient. This state of affairs continuing, they seriously considered the surrendering of the Charter since they neither could meet the expenses of the Lodge nor the dues of the Grand Lodge. It probably would have been done had it not been for a faithful few who made great personal sacrifices to retain that Charter.

In 1810, we find the Lodge adopting a new set of By-Laws. One article provides that the Secretary shall be paid $6. per annum, provided he should faithfully attend to the duties of that office. After examining the records of the Lodge since its institution, it is a pleasure to say that the secretaries as a rule are entitled not only to the salary, but to the thanks of every member. The records are neat, well arranged and usually quite complete. However, prior to adopting this set of By-Laws, the Lodge seems to have had some difficulty with the different secretaries over the financial reports. While they performed their duties faithfully, they seemingly felt that certain sums were due them at the expiration of their term of office and refused to give up the funds of the Lodge until the matter was settled. This may account for the establishment of the salary in the new code.

How long the Lodge continued to occupy Munn's Hall, after its institution, is uncertain, but its first removal was to a building on Federal Street, standing about where Rita's Candy Shop and Simmons Jewelry Store are now located. In 1817 a hall on the second floor in the new school building, now known as the Avery House, on School Street near the northeast corner of Ames Street, was fitted up and occupied. Franklin Royal Arch Chapter, which had just been granted a Charter, assisted in furnishing this hall where it also held its meetings.

Before taking leave of the old Munn's Tavern where the early meetings were held, and where the hearty greetings, hale fellowship and good dinners were had, a reported incident that took place should not be omitted from these notes. One October afternoon, the Brethren were assembled to transact the customary business and confer the first degree. The business of the meeting occupied more than the usual time, and the candidate became impatient. The longer he waited the more uneasy and distrustful he became. After loitering about for some time and seeking something to divert his mind from the impending doom, he finally seated himself at the old fireplace in the kitchen. The cook was engaged in cleaning up the various kitchen utensils. After a time, she brought out an old-fashioned gridiron and placed it over the fire to burn off the accumulated grease, previous to washing it. At this, the poor candidate, in a distressed state of mind, eagerly inquired "What she was doing?" The woman, tiring of his company, somewhat tartly replied that "there was a Mason meeting upstairs and a felluw was to be taken in and . . . ." Before she could finish the sentence and inform him that she was expected to prepare a dinner for them, the candidate took to his heels and was gone. He probably never knew the exact Masonic use of that gridiron. This supposedly same gridiron is reported to have hung in the ante-room of the quarters which the Lodge occupied in the Mansion House. In moving to the present building in 1897, it evidently became lost.

In 1820 the attendance at the meetings was very small and the membership reduced to thirty-five. A committee that had been appointed to consider the advisability of surrendering the Charter reported adversely. The remaining members decided to hold on for a while longer. Yet in their adversity, we find them contributing generously to the relief of their Masonic Brethren who suffered by the great fire in Troy, New York, in that year. At the annual meeting the Treasurer reported the assets of the Lodge to be $9.00, with liabilities of $104.00, of which $94.00 was owed to the Grand Lodge. It was indeed a gloomy outlook. Not a degree had been conferred nor an application for membership been received in over a year. A committee was appointed to see what property of the Lodge could be lawfully sold and to solicit subscriptions to pay ofF the indebtedness. Their efforts were in vain, and the amount could not be raised.

On November 6, 1821, after getting the consent of Harmony Lodge, it was voted 5 to 4 to remove the Lodge to Gill. The Grand Lodge on December 12, 1821, sanctioned the removal provided "they shall have paid their dues to the Grand Lodge."

On Thursday, February 21, 1822, the last meeting was held in Greenfield. Brothers John Bates and John Chase advanced $107.00 to pay the dues to the Grand Lodge and the Lodge removed to Gill.

The first meeting was held in the house of Bro. Alfred Alvord. The By-Laws were again amended. The Secretary's salary of six dollars a year was entirely cut ofF. The Tyler's pay was cut to fifty cents a meeting. Every member was assessed twenty cents per meeting whether present or not.

Although twenty-five members were added during their sojourn in Gill, prosperity did not return. Frequent discussions were held on the advisability of another removal, but, as no better location could be found, the matter was dropped.

The next to the last candidate to be initiated was Abner Dalrymple, who was about to journey to the west. He rode to New Salem to ask the District Deputy Grand Master for a dispensation to take his degrees in one day. The District Deputy Grand Master had moved to Boston. The Lodge upon his reporting the matter moved "upon deliberate and mature consideration" to give him his degrees without a dispensation.

The last candidate to receive his degrees was Elizah Pike, 2nd, in 1827. During 1828 and 1829, meetings were held regularly with from five to nine members present and with the May meeting in 1830 the records end.

In these thirty-five years, Republican Lodge had received 251 into membership and had made possible the institution of Harmony, Harris, Jerusalem, Pacific and Mountain Lodges.

In 1833 the Charter was surrendered. Now follows about twenty years of the anti-masonry period.

However, on December 10, 1851, the Grand Lodge renewed the Charter and Republican Lodge recommenced its labors in Greenfield, as it had done fifty-seven years before. The first regular meeting was held January 3, 1852, in Odd Fellows Hall. The next few meetings were also held in that hall then in an ell of the J. H. Hollister house, when it was a High School for Young Ladies. This hall was later J. B. Kennedy's building on Newton Place, back of the Town Hall, where he conducted his plumbing business.

Within two years, the Lodge received 43 new members and had furnished and occupied a hall in the Davis Block, which was located on Main Street where the Sheldon Block now stands. Indeed, so prosperous was the Lodge, it was soon felt that more commodious quarters were necessary. Accordingly, in 1856, a hall was furnished and equipped in the Mansion House. When the Mansion House was reconstructed in 1873, new quarters were also provided for the Lodge.

At the time of the ceasing of the Lodge in 1830, its property and treasures were scattered among its members for safe keeping. The Bible, Square and Compasses were taken in charge by Bro. John Bates, a resident of Gill, and whose membership began in 1806. He subsequently abandoned the Order. A Mrs. Abigail Wrisley lived nearby, and on seeing the Bible, became attached to it and secured it in trade for an old gun. Her daughter, Miss M. Phila Wrisley, on May 28, 1885, very graciously returned the Bible to the Lodge. The Square and Compasses bearing the name of the Lodge were brought in to J. H. Hollister, Jeweler, who informed the late Wor. George Wilby that after keeping them six months, they were disposed of with other similar ware to a dealer in old silver.

In 1889 the Lodge was again suffering from growing pains and a committee was appointed to "buy a piece of real estate." However, nothing came of it, although similar committees were appointed each year through 1893.

On February 7, 1895, the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Lodge was celebrated with a service at the Second Congregational Church, which was filled to capacity and a banquet for 600 was served in Washington Hall.

On April 4, 1895, it was voted to form the Masonic Hall Association and the present property was purchased. The old buildings were torn down arid on April 23, 1896, Right Worshipful Franklin E. Snow, acting as Most Worshipful Grand Master, laid the corner-stone of the present building that we now occupy. The records inform us that the box in this stone contains the following: Copy of the Charter, Constitution, By-Laws and list of members and Past Masters of Republican Lodge. List of members of Franklin Royal Arch Chapter, Titus Strong Council and Connecticut Valley Commandery. Copies of various previous Addresses, By-Laws, Masonic Directories and some badges of the Commandery. Copy of the Hymn written by F. J. Hosmer for the ceremony. Copies of the Gazette and Courier for February 7, March 21 and April 18, 1896, the Springfield Republican and Boston Advertiser for April 23, 1896. Copy of Grand Lodge Proceedings for 1895. Copy of Greenfield Poll List, Names of the Building Committee and the Officers who took part in the ceremony, and lastly, a copy of the Birthday Poem written by Dr. Charles L. Fiske, who was the oldest Mason in Connecticut Valley on the occasion of his 92nd birthday on December 25, 1895.

On December 9, 1897, the first meeting was held in the new lodge rooms and on February 8, 1898, the dedication was held. The Grand Lodge was present and Most Worshipful Charles C. Hutchinson, Grand Master, conducted the ceremony. After closing the Lodge, a collation was served in the banquet hall, where short speeches by prominent Masons were given.

In July, 1898, Senior Warden Charles H. Field lost his life while serving as 1st Lt. of Co. L of the 2nd Mass. Volunteers in Cuba. On October 26, 1899, when the Lodge voted to establish its Charity Fund, it was named The Charles H. Field Charity Fund in his honor.

In 1851 when the Grand Lodge voted to renew the Charter of Republican Lodge, a Renewal Charter was issued and signed by Edward A. Raymond, who was Grand Master at that time. The Lodge worked under the authority of this Renewal Charter until 1909, when on June 9th, this substitute was given back to the Grand Lodge and the original Charter, signed by Paul Revere, was returned to the Lodge. In 1913 Romanzo S. Pritchard died. He had served Republican Lodge faithfully as Tyler for about forty years.

On May 7, 1914, the first Past Masters Night was observed and since that time it has been an annual event. On June 4, 1914, the Advisory Board of Past Masters was established.

On February 5, 1920, Brother Frank Curtis delivered a historical address in recognition of the 125th Anniversary of the founding of Republican Lodge.

The growth of the Lodge had been healthy and steady since its re-establishment, but following the First World War the membership grew by leaps and bounds. In 1920 there were held 11 regular and 44 special meetings, with 62 new members added. In 1921 there were 10 regular and 50 special meetings, with a gain of 67 members. The meeting held on March 4, 1920, is of special interest. On that occasion there were received one application for affiliation, 12 applications for degrees and the Lodge also voted on 17 petitions and granted more time to the investigating committees on two others for a total of 32 for the meeting.

On May 19, 1922, Most Worshipful Arthur D. Prince, Grand Master, attended for the purpose of unveiling the Honor Roll of those members of Republican Lodge who served in the First World War. There was also a band to give a martial touch to the occasion.

In 1922 the Lodge felt the need of enlarged quarters and a committee was appointed to secure a site for a new building. The location was decided upon and the land purchased. However, on June 4, 1925, the Lodge voted to sell the property and on November 26, 1925, voted to alter the present building. These alterations resulted in providing adequate club-rooms, ante-rooms, etc., for the various Masonic functions.

On April 10, 1928, Most Worshipful Frank L. Simpson, Grand Master, visited the Lodge for the purpose of presenting 12 Veteran's Medals to those members who had been Masons for fifty years.

On September 18, 1930, the Lodge voted to take the Organ Fund, which had been slowly accumulating, and purchase a new organ. A committee was appointed to secure additional funds. On October 8, 1931, the new organ was dedicated. E. E. McHaffey gave the Organ Recital and Rev. Bro. Dr. Arthur P. Pratt gave the Dedicatory Address.

On February 25, 1932, the Lodge celebrated the 200th Anniversary of Washington's Birthday. The work of the evening was performed with the officers dressed in Colonial costumes and Brother John W. Haigis delivered an address on the life of Washington.

During the depression years, the membership did not show any increases, but by 1940 the steady upward trend was resumed and is continuing.

Thus we come to the end of the first one hundred and fifty years in the history of Republican Lodge.

175TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, FEBRUARY 1970

From Proceedings, Page 1970-4:

The History of Republican Lodge From 1945 to 1970
By Wor. Norman W. Whitcomb, Jr.

(A detailed history of Republican Lodge for the period from 1794 to 1945 by Wor. Malcolm Butement may be found in the Proceedings of Grand Lodge for 1945—pages 361-373, inclusive.)

To continue the History of Republican Lodge from 1945 to 1970. The excellent History of Republican Lodge was written by the late Malcolm Butement, Past Master of the Lodge, from its beginning in August 1794 to the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary in October 1945.

Wor. James H. Pierson was Master at the time of the 150th Anniversary.

Since then twenty-two Masters now living have occupied the Oriental Chair in the East of Republican Lodge.

The Lodge has enjoyed normal prosperity and the tradition of fine ritualistic work has been maintained, as each year a dedicated group of officers have carried on the work of the Lodge.

Abstracts from the Minutes of significant meetings of the Lodge during the past twenty-five years follow:

Thursday, November 1st A.L. 5945
150th Anniversary Celebration

A Special Communication of Republican Lodge was held in Masonic Hall, 393 Main Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts. Opened on the Master Mason Degree in Form at 6:10 P.M. o'clock with officers as recorded.

  • John A. Ross, W. M.
  • James H. Pierson, S. W.
  • Harold W. Phillips, J. W.
  • Arthur L. Staples, Sec.
  • Philip D. Adams, Mar.
  • C. Raymond Bond, S. D.
  • Charles J. Hampshire J. D.
  • William R. Cleary S. S.
  • Clarence S. Strecker, J. S.
  • Malcolm Butement, Tyler


The Craft were called from labor to refreshment and repaired to the Mansion House where a fine turkey dinner was served to a large number of members and guests.

At 8:15 P.M. o'clock, the Craft were called from refreshment to labor. Worshipful William B. Hall, Grand Pursuivant of Ashley Falls, was received in due form, and informed us the Rt. Worshipful James E. Watson, Junior Grand Warden and acting Grand Master, was in waiting for the purpose of paying Republican Lodge a fraternal visit.

A committee, Wor. Hector MacDonald, Wor. Roy Peterson and Wor. Harold Zeiner, was appointed to greet and escort the Acting Grand Master to the Lodge.

The Rt. Wor. James F. Watson, Junior Grand Warden and Acting Grand Master, and Suite of Past and Present D. D. G. Masters of this and other Districts, were received in due and ancient form. After introducing in the usual form, the Acting Grand Master assumed the East and informed us that the Grand Lodge had opened a meeting in the adjoining apartment and we were now sitting in that open meeting.

He brought greetings and best wishes from our Grand Master, Most Wor. Samuel H. Wragg. After some very fine remarks appropriate to this occasion, he resigned the East to our Worshipful Master.

Wor. Charles A. Wheeler, Master of Republican Lodge, 1893-1895, our oldest living Past Master, was called upon for remarks and recalled items of interest of the 100th anniversary fifty years ago.

The Blue Lodge Quartette, Brothers: Edward Reynolds, Leonard Bigelow, Ernest Alexander and John Medland, rendered a selection in Due Form with Bro. Willet Forbes at the organ.

Worshipful Malcolm Butement, who had completed the History of Republican Lodge for the full one hundred and fifty years, read the same, calling to our attention the Original Charter signed by Most Worshipful Paul Revere and now on the Treasurer's Desk, under glass.

The Bible used by Republican Lodge in its early years was now open on the Altar. Two pictures of former prominent members of Republican Lodge hung on the walls. Selections were rendered by the Quartette.

Brother and Reverend Kenneth R. Henly, in a few very fine remarks, then introduced Bro. and Rev. Thomas R. Burns of the Union Methodist Church of Fall River as guest speaker, whose subject "More Light" was enjoyed by the 163 present. The East was again assumed by the Acting Grand Master, who by virtue of authority on him conferred, declared the Grand Lodge Closed and also this Special Communication of Republican Lodge closed.

Time 10:15 o'clock
Arthur L. Staples, Sec.

Thursday, April 4, A. L. 5946

A Special Communication of Republican Lodge was held in Masonic Hall, Thursday, April 4, A.L. 5946. Previous to opening, a dinner was served at the Mansion House to Past Masters, and Officers of Republican Lodge in honor of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Samuel H. Wragg, and other Grand Officers who were to pay the Lodge a Fraternal Visit. Opened on the Master Mason degree in form at 8 P.M. o'clock with officers as recorded.

  • James H. Pierson, W. M.
  • Harold W. Phillips, S. W.
  • C. Raymond Bond, J. W.
  • Frank A. Yeaw, Treas.
  • Arthur L. Staples, Sec.
  • John A. Ross, Chap.
  • William R. Cleary, Mar.
  • Charles J. Hampshire, S. D.
  • Phillip D. Adams, J. D.
  • Clarence S. Strecker, S. S.
  • Dexter R. MacDonald, J. S.
  • Herbert A. White, I. S.
  • Willet U. Forbes, Org.
  • Clifford H. Kingsley, Tyler


The Rt. Wor. Whitfield W. Johnson, Grand Marshal, was received and informed our Master that the Most Worshipful Samuel W. Wragg was present for the purpose of paying Republican Lodge a fraternal visit.

Wor. Master recognized his authority and would wait upon him forthwith a committee. The committee appointed were: Rt. Wor. Frank H. Reed, Wor. Charles E. Winslow and Wor. Frank A. Yeaw. The Grand Master and Suite were formally received and the Grand Master, introduced by Rt. Wor. Bro. Reed and after greetings by our Master, the East was resigned to him.

Before assuming the Chair, he presented the members of his Suite consisting of the following: Rt. Wor. Roger Keith, Deputy Grand Master, Rt. Wor. Peter A. Day, Senior Grand Warden, Rt. Wor. Harry A. Starr, Junior Grand Warden, Rt. Wor. Clarence Fisher, P. D. D. Grand Master, Rt. Wor. George E. Clapp, Present D. D. Grand Master of the District, Rt. Wor. James L. Reid, Grand Pursuivant, Rt. Wor. C. Weston Ringer, Grand Pursuivant, Wor. Paul Keith, Grand Standard Bearer and Rt. Wor. Whitfield W. Johnson, Grand Marshal.

Selections by our Quartette.

Remarks by Rt. Wor. Roger Keith, Rt. Wor. Peter A. Day, and Rt. Wor. Harry A. Starr, closing his remarks with a song, closely related, led by him and joined by all.

On direction of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, our Wor. Charles E. Winslow was conducted to the East and there presented a Distinguished Service Emblem by the Grand Master. Bro. Winslow received it with very appropriate words. Rt. Wor. George E. Clapp, D.D.G.M. also spoke briefly.

Lodge was closed in Ample Form by the Most Worshipful Grand Master at 9:30 P.M. Refreshments were served after closing.

A. L. Staples, Sec.

Thursday, Feb. 27, 1947, A.L. 5947

Past Masters' night was held and a plaque was dedicated to the honor of the members of Republican Lodge, who served their country in World War II, by Wor. Malcolm Butement.

This Dedication in the year of Wor. Harold W. Phillips. The plaque is permanently attached to the west wall in the north corner with the following names recorded:—

"THAT THEIR NAMES MAY LIVE WITH THEIR VALOR"

  • Robert T. Bitters
  • Edward C. Blake
  • David B. Bond
  • Lyman H. Brown
  • Forrest P. Brown
  • William B. Buck
  • John D. Caldwell
  • Walter L. Campbell
  • Norman B. Carey
  • Robert R. Clapp
  • Harwood W. Cummings
  • Frank H. Dalton
  • Lawrence R. Dame
  • Frederick A. Dunn
  • Harold L. Field
  • Spencer C. Flo
  • Lawrence E. Gibson
  • S. Aubrey Gray
  • Robert S. Hall
  • Richard K. Holbrook
  • Newell M. Kendrick
  • Robert E. Koehler
  • Malcolm E. Lodge
  • Dexter R. MacDonald
  • Ralph W. Michelman
  • Nathaniel B. Miller
  • Frank A. Millett
  • Carl H. Morrill
  • Ernest G. Oakman
  • Albert E. Pearce
  • John T. H. Powers
  • Fred C. Seibert
  • Milton M. Sisson
  • Richard A. Smith
  • Hosea R. Wheeler, Jr.


= Died in Service

Thursday, Oct. 15, 1953
Annual Meeting

Rt. Wor. Frank A. Yeaw gave a report on the progress in the construction of the elevator. Thomas J. Gass Co. has the contract for the construction, and the shaft is now completed with the exception of the installation of the doors. It is now estimated that about $25,000 will be needed to complete the job with elevator installed and everything complete, There has been about $18,000 pledged which means there will have to be another drive to secure the additional $7,000 needed. The Wor. Master, Lee Stiles, reported the silver pocket pieces which the service committee were selling had netted the elevator fund $250.00.

October 14, 1954

A Special Communication was called for the purpose of conferring the Master Mason Degree on Brothers Charles Gabriel Greene and Donald Howard Short. The Officers of Republican Lodge worked the First Section of this Degree and then a short recess was called.

Following the recess, the members of the Degree Team of the Scottish Hiram Associates from Worcester were received and their Officers took their stations and worked the Second and Third Sections and Brothers Charles Gabriel Greene and Donald Howard Short were raised to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason in Due and Ancient Form. This team puts on the Degree with the official Massachusetts ritual, complete with kilts, bag-pipes and broad Scottish accent. Officers filling the chairs are as follows: Master, Wor. David Robertson, P. M., Rufus Putnam Lodge, Rutland; Senior Warden, Wor. William Russell, P. M., Olive Branch Lodge, Millbury; Junior Warden, Wor. Royal Cooper, P. M. Morning Star Lodge, Worcester; Treas. Bro. Thomas Martin; Sec. Bro. James A. Home, St. John's Lodge, Glasgow, Scotland; Chaplain, Bro. Archie J. Home, Morning Star Lodge, Worcester; Marshal, Bro. Robert Pratt, Montacute Lodge, Worcester; Senior Deacon, R. W. Russell M. Blackmer, Morning Star Lodge, Worcester; Junior Deacon, Bro. Wilson Seller, Athelstan Lodge, Worcester; Senior Steward, Bro. Melvin Reytresl; Junior Steward, Bro. George Cowan; Inside Sentinel, Bro. Charles Mitchell; First Gate, Bro. Curtis Mastland; Second Gate, Bro. Dorman Spear; Third Gate, Bro. Andrew Home; Pipers, Bro. David Stark, Bro. Fred Robertson, Bro. Warren MacConnell.

Sec. C. Raymond Bond

In subsequent years the following series of special events took place:

  • 1955 — A degree team of the Police Square Club of Massachusetts conferred the Master Mason Degree on a class of candidates in Republican Lodge.
  • 1956 —
    • Wor. Bro. Harold Phillips, our present Secretary, conferred the Master Mason degree on his two sons.
    • Republican Lodge journeyed to Social Friends Lodge, Keene, N. H. to confer the Master Mason Degree on one of our candidates and the officers of Social Friends Lodge returned the visit at a later date and conferred the Master Mason Degree on one of their candidates.
  • 1957— The General Westover Square Club conferred the Master Mason Degree on a candidate of Republican Lodge in Greenfield.
  • 1958 — Special Communication for a visit from Mt. Anthony Lodge of Bennington, Vermont, for exemplification of the Master Mason Degree on one of their candidates. Return visit by Republican Lodge to Bennington, Vermont, was made for conferring the Master Mason degree on one of our candidates.
  • 1959 — Visit from officers and members of Mount Orthodox Lodge, West Springfield, for exemplification of Master Mason degree on their candidate.
  • 1960 —
    • Hellenic Square and Compass Club, a Greek Degree Team from Brookline, Massachusetts, exemplified the Master Mason Degree using 15 Fellowcrafts. This was preceded by a steak supper and net proceeds of $50. was donated to St. Basil Academy of New York, one of their Greek charities. 217 attended.
    • Mount Orthodox Lodge of West Springfield, Massachusetts, again visited Republican Lodge for conferral of the Master Mason degree on candidates of their Lodge.
    • Spanish Night on April 30, 1960. Fifty-nine members of La Universal Lodge of New York City journeyed to Republican Lodge and exemplified the Master Mason Degree on five of their candidates in their own special form of degree work. This memorable occasion took place in the Greenfield High School gymnasium preceded by a steak dinner in the High School cafeteria. Attendance was 700 to 800 Brethren. Profit of $4-71 was deposited to the Lodge Improvement Fund.
    • In the summer of 1960, the Lodge furniture was reuphol-tered in red. It was formerly blue.
    • Received a visit from the Hiram Associates Degree Team of Worcester with their colorful bagpipes, drums and kilts. The Master Mason degree was exemplified by these Brethren and attendance was 140.
  • 1961 — Purchased a new television set for the Lodge Club Room.
  • 1962 — Mount Orthodox Lodge of West Springfield, Massachusetts, again visited Republican Lodge and did their usual fine job of conferring the Master Mason degree.
  • 1963 —
    • Change in Republican Lodge By-Laws for election of officers in June. Formerly elected at the Annual Meeting in October.
    • Return visit to Mount Orthodox by Republican Lodge Officers. A very warm Fraternal relationship has existed between these two Lodges for many years.
  • 1964 — Visit again to Mount Orthodox Lodge by officers of Republican Lodge and return visit the same year for an exchange of degree work.
  • 1965 — Mount Orthodox Lodge again at Republican Lodge for degree work of the finest quality.
  • 1966 —
    • Twenty officers and members of Republican Lodge journeyed to Jerusalem Lodge, Plainfield, New Jersey, where we conferred the Master Mason degree on one of our candidates. Jerusalem Lodge returned the visit to Republican Lodge the same month for an exchange of work.
    • Mount Orthodox Lodge of West Springfield made another fraternal visit to Republican Lodge to continue our warm relationship with these Brethren.
  • 1968 — Received our new District Deputy Grand Master, Right Worshipful Monroe E. Smith, of Republican Lodge, on his first Fraternal Visit with his Suite of District Grand Officers: Wor. Herbert H. Maynard, DDSGW; Wor. James O. S. Graves, DDJGW; Wor. Alfred D. Varley, DDG. Treas.; Wor. George F. Berry, DDG. Sec; Wor. Norman W. Whitcomb, Jr., DDG. Marshal.
  • 1969 —
    • There were a series of six meetings of Lodges in the Greenfield 14th Masonic District with non-members as invited guests at a supper preceding each meeting. The Lodges in the district took turns at each meeting in exemplifying some part of the work in each of the degrees, while the invited guests were entertained by Past Masters of the Lodge up in the dining room. At a Special Communication in Republican Lodge, the Most Worshipful Herbert H. Jaynes, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts and his Suite were received and introduced after which the Grand Master assumed the East. After appropriate remarks, he resigned the Gavel and Oriental Chair to Wor. Samuel J. Yeager, Jr., who opened a Lodge of Entered Apprentices and then turned the East over to Wor. Eric Pell and his Suite of Officers from Fort Chambly Lodge No. 132, Fort Chambly, Quebec, Canada, who exemplified the First Degree on one of their candidates in Canadian Form. The Canadian Ritual is quite different from Massachusetts Ritual and employs quite a bit of music in their work. They did a very fine job in exemplifying the Degree and their Canadian accents added to our enjoyment of the work. The Worshipful Master of Republican Lodge received from the Worshipful Master of Fort Chambly Lodge a very beautiful Canadian Flag in remembrance of this occasion of their visit. This memorable visit from our Canadian Brethren was preceded by a very fine dinner served in the banquet hall. The next day, Sunday, the Brethren of Republican Lodge and Fort Chambly Lodge attended Church Service at the Methodist Church in Greenfield, conducted by Bro. and Rev. James R. Duncan. Escort to the Church was provided by the boys of Franklin Chapter of DeMolay. The Brethren returned to the banquet hall at the Temple for dinner after which our Canadian friends departed for their homes in Canada. Attendance at the Saturday night degree work was 135. This historical event took place on Saturday, May 10, 1969.
    • By special dispensation from the Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, a Special Communication was held in Fort Chambly Lodge No. 132, A.F. & A.M., meeting in St. Lambert Masonic Temple, St. Lambert, Quebec, Canada, Saturday, May 31, A.L. 5969. Fort Chambly Lodge opened on the First Degree, then changed to the Second Degree, then changed to the Third Degree to receive the Most Worshipful John B. Nayler, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, and his very distinguished Suite. Most Worshipful Brother Nayler expressed his regrets that our Most Worshipful Grand Master could not be present, but was happy that our District Deputy Grand Master, Right Worshipful Monroe E. Smith and Right Worshipful George E. Clapp were in attendance. Fort Chambly Lodge then turned the East over to Wor. Bro. Yeager, who opened Republican Lodge on the Third Degree. After a few remarks explaining some of the Massachusetts ritual, the Lodge was changed to the Second Degree and our candidate, Bro. Walter Frank Westlake, delivered his Second Degree lecture and he did a very fine job. The Lodge was then changed over to the Third Degree for the purpose of conferring the Master Mason Degree on Bro. Westlake. After the charge by Wor. Bro. Herbert H. Maynard, Wor. Bro. Yeager turned the Gavel and Oriental Chair over to Wor. Bro. Pell of Fort Chambly Lodge and presented a Linked States Flag to the Lodge to commemorate the occasion of this return visit by Republican Lodge. Most Worshipful Brother Nayler then closed Fort Chambly Lodge No. 132 in short form after which Wor. Bro. Yeager closed Republican Lodge in form at 11:00 P.M. Prior to the degree work, the members of Republican Lodge were guests of our Canadian Brethren at a sumptuous dinner in their banquet hall. After spending the night in the homes of our friends and Brethren, we enjoyed breakfast at their Lodge and then were escorted on a walking tour of Fort Chambly with visits to ancient and historical buildings and grounds. After a hearty dinner served by our friends in their own Lodge at Fort Chambly, we exchanged warm fraternal greetings and departed for our homes with many warm memories of Canadian hospitality. Plans were formulated for future visits between the two Lodges.

200TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, FEBRUARY 1995

From Proceedings, Page 1995-3:

The history of Republican Lodge may well be divided into five periods. Twenty-five years of earnest and anxious struggle, thirty years of censure, misfortune and decadence, twenty years of restoration, one hundred ten years of successful organization and achievement, and fifteen years of struggle and decline.

Previous to 1794, the institution of Freemasonry had no organized body to represent it in Greenfield. The nearest lodges were at Keene, New Hampshire and Worcester, Massachusetts. Accordingly, a few Freemasons living in Greenfield and vicinity, feeling the need of closer Masonic ties, took the first steps for forming a lodge in Greenfield by petitioning Rising Sun Lodge of Keene to intercede with the M. W. Grand Lodge at Boston for a dispensation to form a new lodge in the following manner:

Greenfield, Mass., August 24, A.L. 5794

To Major William Todd and the rest of the brethren of the Rising Sun Lodge:

Worshipful Master, Worshipful Wardens and Worthy Brethren: Fortune and chance had placed a few of us of the Masonic Order in this town, all of which have been authentically Initiated, Passed, and Raised to the Sublime degree in the same, and whereas, the distance from here to any lodge regularly constituted is so great, which renders our wishful inclinations as visitors, very inconvenient, without much loss of time and expense, and having the good of Masonry at heart, ever endeavoring for its promotion, together with the situation of this town, where members of the most respectable character are only waiting for a regular and due establishment of the same. We, your sincere brothers, crave your kind assistance, in recommending us to the Right Worshipful Grand Lodge in Boston, whereby we may with due submission, obtain a dispensation to open a new Lodge here.

Viewing the situation of this place, and the distance we are from any well constituted Lodge, we flatter ourselves that your Worshipful Lodge will hold our wishes up in the clearest light and grant us that brotherly assistance which we crave. We are, with due regard, your sincere brothers and very humble servants.

  • John Long Jr., Esq.
  • Calvin Johnson
  • William Grinnell
  • Edward Houghton
  • Amos Cornwell
  • Abel Wilder
  • Calvin Munn
  • Daniel Wilder
  • Nodiah Kellogg
  • Eliphaz Alexander

The petition was favorably recommended to the consideration of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts by Rising Sun Lodge, and at the quarterly communication of the same, held on December 8th, was granted.

In the January 15, 1795 issue of the Greenfield Gazette the following notice was printed:

To All Free and Accepted Masons:

Brethren:

You are hereby cordially invited to attend at Mr. Munn's in Greenfield, on Wednesday the 28th day of January, current, at which time and place will be constituted, in due form, a Lodge of Free Masons, by the name of "Republican Lodge." It is expected that the business will be performed by Brother Isaiah Thomas, Senior Grand Warden, and that a discourse will be delivered at the meeting house in Greenfield, to begin at 11 o'clock in the forenoon: After exercises the brethren are desired to repair to Mr. Munn's for refreshment, and perform the duties of the day.

John Long, Jr., Master
Greenfield, January 8, 1795.

On January 28th, 1795, the first meeting of Republican Lodge was held in Munn's Tavern which stood at the corner of Main and Federal Streets, where the Greenfield Savings Bank is now situated. The nine officers and twenty-five brethren attended by a "very large concourse of gentlemen and ladies" then walked in procession to the Meeting House which was situated near the corner of Federal and Silver Streets.

There the Rev. Mr. Parsons of Amherst delivered a "well adapted sermon," taking for his text, "And the Lord make you to increase and abound in love, one toward another and toward all men even as we do toward you"; at the conclusion of which, the Brethren repaired to Brother Munn's hall at the Tavern where the concluding service was held. Worshipful Brother Isaiah Thomas, Senior Grand Warden installed the Officers of the newly created Lodge and gave a Masonic oration. Wor. Bro. John Long, Jr. was the first Master.

The Charter of Republican Lodge is the first of the twenty-three charters signed by the Most Worshipful Grand Master Paul Revere and the precedence of the Lodge dates from January 9, 1795, while the Charter is dated February 7, 1795.

For a considerable time the Regular Communications of the Lodge were usually held at 2 P.M. The next succeeding being held February 11th, and "Opened on the first step," as the record tersely expresses it, the usual business transacted, the refreshments partaken of, and the Lodge closed in due form. The stewards' bills ranged from 4 shillings, 6 pence, to 1 pound, 6 pence, for each meeting during the first few years.

The brethren early became sincere devotees to the patron saints of Free Masonry and on the 24th of June, 1795 duly celebrated the Festival of St. John the Baptist. On this occasion, which forms the basis of subsequent observances of the kind, the lodge as a body, marched in procession to the Meeting House and in the quaint language of the record, "listened to a well adapted sermon by the Rev. Roger Newton," after which they repaired to Bro. Munn's Hall and partook of the entertainment provided for the occasion, worked the 2nd and 3rd degrees, proposed two candidates and closed the lodge. As this was the first festival observed by the lodge, they seem to have thought it fitting to be unmindful of the steward, who, however was not dilatory in bringing in a bill of 8 pounds, 11 shillings, 8 pence.

The following year, 1796, the festival was again celebrated by another "well adapted sermon" and the addition of an oration. Mindful of the wily steward with his large bills, the lodge resolved this year to circumvent him by passing a vote that "no guests, save the clergy," happy men should be invited to the dinner (sic). By this strategic vote the desired financial result was attained and the steward, poor fellow, was forced to content himself with a bill one-half that of the previous year.

Having now learned how to reduce expenses, the lodge resolved in December to celebrate the anniversary of St. John the Evangelist. This festival was carried out much the same as the preceding ones; a sermon, an oration pronounced to be "truly elegant" and lastly, plenty to eat and drink. For the next thirty years recurring festivals were celebrated with great regularity. The June festival being always observed, and the December festival seldom omitted. This apparent partiality probably was due to a preference for the month of roses, rather than for the bleak winds and snows of December.

During the first year a code of By-Laws was adopted. However, they seem to have been a source of much trouble and frequently were "dispensed" with in order to accomplish something they would not otherwise allow; such as receiving an application from, ballot on, and perhaps work all three degrees on a candidate at the same meeting. For the first few years committees were appointed frequently to alter or amend them. These By-Laws also contained specific rules of conduct, and every member was instructed on his behavior both within and without the lodge, that no unjust reflection might be cast on the "Royal Art."

Every brother was held accountable to the principles of Truth, Justice, Honesty and Charity. He who deviated from the path that is straight and narrow was quickly reminded of his error and brought before the Lodge for judgment. If the offense was of a serious nature, he was immediately brought to trial, judged with candor, admonished with friendship and reprehended with justice.

At the meeting held December 28, 1795, Elijah Alvord was "Initiated as Tyler and is to stand in that post for one year." At the next meeting Bro. Alvord was "Passed and Raised to the Sublime."

"In the East there is Light in Republican Lodge held at Greenfield on the 9th day of November A.L. 5796" was the very expressive sentence at the beginning of the record of this meeting and was the opening sentence of the record of nearly every meeting until June 17, 1807.

The record of the meeting held March 1st, 1797 is interesting. After listing the officers, the record says, "Visitors Bro. Lee, Bro. West, Bro. Clapp, Bro. Flagg. Lodge opened on the third step. Bro. Flagg raised to the Sublime Degree and paid his fee to the Treasurer. Lodge closed on the third step. Lodge opened on the Mark Step by Bro. West and Bro. Smith. Brethren Marked: - Bro. Long, Bro. Cornwell, Bro. Stone, Bro. Wait, Bro. Munn, Bro. Gilbert, Bro. Wells, Bro. Graves, Bro. Ames, Bro. Clapp, Bro. Langdon. Steward Bill paid. Lodge closed on the fourth step by Worshipful Lee." The Bro. Smith was the Rev. Preserved Smith of Rowe, who was raised October 14, 1795. He was born in Ashfield, served in the Revolution and was a minister in Rowe for 35 years. Bro. Flagg, who received his 3rd degree at this meeting had been admitted to membership in 1796 and Republican Lodge had been severely censured by the Grand Lodge for admitting a Fellowcraft to membership. As we have no records to identify Brothers Lee and West, they evidently were sent here to see that Bro. Flagg was properly healed.

During the early years the funds of the lodge must have been rather meager, for at the October 11, 1797 meeting we find that a committee is "chosen to see that the money due the Grand Lodge be immediately forwarded and that hereafter there shall not be any notes given for Passing or Raising fees." Notes were taken to such an extent that they found themselves without funds. The first report for 1802 reads as follows:

"Cash in the hands of Bro. Calvin Munn the Past Treasurer which has not yet been paid over to the Treasurer $ 90.19.
Notes on hand against several Bros, as reported December 28, 1801, $418.60
Cash received by Treasurer since Settlement December 28, 1801, $ 17.49 1/2
Treas. charge against the Lodge $10.20
Available Funds $ 7.29 1/2

In 1801, the Lodge procured a seal with the motto "Follow Reason." In commenting on this motto Won Bro. Bowdoin S. Parker said, "Noble words, expressing at once the highest standard of moral action and the supreme arbiter of every motive in life" and that "No narrow, bigoted or unthinking minds could have chosen it."

On the second Wednesday of December 1802, Rt. Wor. Bro. Solomon Vose, D. D. G. Master paid the first Official Visitation ever held in Republican Lodge. He was one of the first group of D.D.G. Masters appointed by the Grand Master "pursuant to the regulations of the Grand Lodge made and established on the 15th of December A.L. 5801." There were thirty brethren present out of the total of 120 that had been initiated and received into membership up to that date. When we take into consideration the time of the year and the distance that many lived from the town, it was a large attendance. The Master lived in Deerfield, the Senior Warden in Leyden, the Treasurer in Northfield, the Senior Deacon and Secretary in Shelburne, and members came from Bernardston, Rowe, Gill, Montague and Sunderland, as well as Greenfield. The D. D. G. Master lived in Northfield, took his degrees in 1796 in Republican Lodge and had been Master of Harmony Lodge.

About this time the ritualistic work of the Lodge was evidently not very good for we find in the records of the 1801 annual meeting: "Voted that a committee be appointed to procure an able and respectable Mason at the expense of the Lodge to reside in this town a convenient time for the purpose of instructing the members of this lodge in the Sublime Mysteries of Masonry." Apparently no one was secured until 1803 when in March it was voted "to pay Wor. Bro. Woodard $3 and to present him with a copy of Bro. Harris' Discourses for his service in instructing the Lodge." However, in 1806 the lodge was receiving instruction from Bro. Benj. Gleason, Grand Lecturer, for the record reads: "Voted that the Treasurer pay Bro. Benj. Gleason, G.L. fifteen dollars for his services. Also that he pay Bro. Munn's bill for refreshments during the time Bro. Gleason visited the Lodge." How much the officers profited by the instruction is impossible to say. The Secretary is the only one we can judge, and he certainly became more concise. Previously he wrote "The Lodge closed and to stand closed till our next regular communication unless called together sooner on some special occasion in which case the Lodge will have timely notice." He now says, "the Lodge was closed in due form."

On January 28th, 1805, Republican Lodge performed its first funeral service and it was held at Shelburne for its first Master, Worshipful Brother Dr. John Long, Jr. In 1807, Brother Avery Williams was appointed Chaplain, being the first brother honored with that office.

In 1808 many members demitted and the membership was greatly reduced. It was proposed to move the lodge to Colrain, but after due deliberation it was deemed inexpedient. This state of affairs continuing, they seriously considered the surrendering of the Charter since they neither could meet the expenses of the lodge nor the dues of the Grand Lodge. It probably would have been done had it not been for a faithful few who made great personal sacrifices to retain that Charter.

In 1810, we find the lodge adopting a new set of By-Laws. One article provides that the Secretary shall be paid $6 per annum, provided that he should faithfully attend to the duties of that office. After examining the records of the lodge since its institution, it is a pleasure to say that the Secretaries, as a rule, are entitled not only to the salary, but to the thanks of every member. The records are neat, well arranged and usually quite complete. However, prior to adopting this set of By-Laws, the lodge seems to have had some difficulty with different Secretaries over the financial reports. While they performed their duties faithfully, they seemingly felt that certain sums were due them at the expiration of their term of office and refused to give up the funds to the lodge until the matter was settled. This may account for the establishment of the salary in the new code.

How long the lodge continued to occupy Munn's Hall, after its institution, is uncertain, but its first removal was to a building on Federal Street, standing about where the Green River Cafe is now located. In 1817 a hall on the second floor in the new school building, later known as the Avery House on School Street near the northeast corner of Ames Street, was fitted up and occupied. This spot is roughly behind Bill's Restaurant where the town parking lot is now. Franklin Royal Arch Chapter which had just been granted a Charter assisted in furnishing this hall where it also held its meetings.

Before taking leave of Munn's Tavern where the early meetings were held, and where the hearty greetings, hale fellowship, and good dinners were had, a reported incident took place that should not be omitted from this history. One October afternoon, the brethren assembled to transact the customary business and confer the First Degree. The business of the meeting occupied more than the usual time, and the candidate became impatient. The longer he waited, the more uneasy and distrustful he became. After loitering about for some time and seeking something to divert his mind from the impending doom, he finally seated himself at the old fireplace in the kitchen. The cook was engaged in cleaning up the various kitchen utensils. After a time she brought out an old-fashioned gridiron and placed it over the fire to burn off the accumulated grease, previous to washing it. At this, the candidate, in a distressed state of mind, eagerly inquired what she was doing. The woman, tiring of his company somewhat tartly replied that "there was a Mason meeting upstairs and a fellow was to be taken in and ..." Before she could inform him that she was expected to prepare a dinner for them, the candidate took to his heels and was gone. He probably never knew the exact Masonic use of that gridiron. This supposedly same gridiron is reported to have hung in the ante-room of the quarters which the lodge occupied in the Mansion House. In moving to the 393 Main Street Lodge in 1897, it evidently became lost.

In 1820 the attendance at the meetings was very small and the membership reduced to thirty-five. A committee that had been appointed to consider the advisability of surrendering the Charter reported adversely. The remaining members decided to hold on for a while longer. Yet in their adversity we find them contributing generously to the relief of their Masonic brethren who suffered by the great fire in Troy, NY in that year. At the annual meeting the Treasurer reported the assets of the lodge to be $9.00 with liabilities of $104.00, of which $94.00 was owed to the Grand Lodge. It was indeed a gloomy outlook. Not a degree had been conferred, nor an application for membership received in over a year. A committee was appointed to see what property of the lodge could be lawfully sold and to solicit subscriptions to pay off the indebtedness. Their efforts were in vain and the amount could not be raised.

On November 6, 1821, after getting the consent of Harmony Lodge, it was voted 5 to 4 to remove the lodge to Gill. The Grand Lodge sanctioned the move on December 12, 1821 provided "they shall have paid their dues to the Grand Lodge."

On Thursday, February 21, 1822, the last meeting was held in Greenfield. Brothers John Bates and John Chase advanced $107.00 to pay the dues to the Grand Lodge and the lodge moved to Gill.

The first meeting in Gill was held in the home of Bro. Alfred Alvord. The By-Laws were again amended. The Secretary's salary of $6 a year was entirely cut off. The Tyler's pay was cut to 50 cents a meeting. Every member was assessed 20 cents per meeting whether present or not.

Although twenty-five members were added during their sojourn in Gill, prosperity did not return. Frequent discussions were held on the advisability of another removal but, as no better location could be found, the matter was dropped.

The next-to-last candidate to be initiated was Abner Dalrymple who was about to journey to the west. He rode to New Salem to ask the D. D. G. M. for a dispensation to take his degrees in one day. The D. D. G. M. had moved to Boston. The lodge, upon his reporting the matter, moved "upon deliberate and mature consideration" to give him his degrees without a dispensation.

The last candidate to receive his degrees was Elizah Pike, 2nd, in 1827. During 1828 and 1829 meetings were held regularly with from five to nine members present and with the May meeting in 1830 the records end.

In these 35 years Republican Lodge had received 251 into membership and made possible the Institution of Harmony, Harris, Jerusalem, Pacific, and Mountain Lodges.

In 1833 the Charter was surrendered. Now follows about twenty years of the anti-Masonry period.

However, on December 10th, 1851, Grand Lodge voted to grant Republican Lodge a Renewal Charter, which was signed by Most Worshipful Edward A. Raymond, and Republican Lodge recommenced its labors in Greenfield, as it had done 57 years before. The first regular meeting was held January 3,1852, in Odd Fellows Hall. The next few meetings were also held in that hall which was then in an ell of the Coleman-Hollister house when it was a High School for Young Ladies. This house is now McCarthy's Funeral Home. However, the ell, on the north of the house where the lodge met, has been torn down and that place is now partly filled by an addition put on the Second Congregational Church.

At the time of the ceasing of the lodge in 1833, its property and treasures were scattered among its members for safekeeping. The Bible, Square and Compasses were taken in charge by Bro. John Bates, a resident of Gill, whose membership began in 1806. He subsequently abandoned the Order. Mrs. Abigail Wrisley lived nearby and on seeing the Bible became attached to it and secured it in trade for an old gun. Her daughter, Miss M. Phila Wrisley on May 28, 1885, very graciously returned the Bible to the lodge. The Square and Compasses bearing the name of the lodge were brought in to J.H. Hollister, Jeweler, who informed the late Wor. George Wilby that after keeping them six months, they were disposed of with other similar ware, to a dealer in old silver.

Within two years the Lodge received 43 new members and had furnished and occupied a hall in the Davis Block which was located on Main Street to the left of the mall in front of the Police station. Indeed, so prosperous was the lodge, it was soon felt that more commodious quarters were necessary. Accordingly, in 1856 a hall was furnished and equipped in the Mansion House. When the Mansion House was reconstructed in 1873 new quarters were also provided for the lodge. The Mansion House sat where Munn's Tavern was and where the Greenfield Savings Bank is now.

In 1889 the lodge was again suffering from growing pains, and a committee was appointed to "buy a piece of real estate." However, nothing came of it, although similar committees were appointed each year through 1893.

On February 7, 1895, the 100th Anniversary of the founding of the lodge was celebrated with a service at the Second Congregational Church, which was filled to capacity, and a banquet for 600 was served in Washington Hall.

On April 4, 1895, it was voted to form the Masonic Hall Association and the property at 393 Main Street was purchased. The old buildings on the site were torn down and on April 23, 1896, Rt. Wor. Franklin E. Snow, acting as M. W. Grand Master, laid the corner stone of the new lodge building. The records inform us that the box in this stone contains the following:

  • Copy of the Charter;
  • Grand Lodge Constitution;
  • By-Laws;
  • List of the members and Past Masters of Republican Lodge;
  • List of members of Franklin Royal Arch Chapter;
  • List of members of Titus Strong Council and Connecticut Valley Commandery;
  • Various Addresses (speeches);
  • Other By-Laws;
  • Masonic Directories;
  • Some badges of the Commandery;
  • Copy of the hymn written by F. J. Hosmer for the ceremony;
  • Copies of the Gazette and Courier for February 7th, March 21st and April 18th, 1896, along with the Springfield Republican and Boston Advertiser for April 23, 1896;
  • Copy of the Grand Lodge Proceedings for 1895;
  • Copy of Greenfield Poll List;
  • Names of the Building Committee and the Officers who took part in the ceremony; and
  • Copy of the Birthday Poem written by Dr. Charles L. Fiske, who was the oldest Mason in Connecticut Valley on the occasion of his 92nd birthday on December 25, 1895.

On December 9, 1897, the first meeting was held in the new lodge rooms and on February 8, 1898, the Dedication was held. The Grand Lodge was present and M. W. Charles C. Hutchinson, Grand Master, conducted the ceremony. After closing the lodge, a collation was served in the banquet hall where short speeches by prominent Masons were given.

On July 1, 1898, Senior Warden Charles H. Field lost his life while serving as 1st Lt. of Company L of the 2nd Massachusetts Volunteers in Cuba. He had been shot in the head during the battle of El Caney while trying to capture Santiago. On October 26, 1899, when the lodge voted to establish its charity fund it was named the Charles H. Field Charity Fund in his honor.

The lodge worked under the authority of its Renewal Charter until 1909 when, on June 9th, this substitute was given back to the Grand Lodge and the original Charter, signed by Paul Revere, was returned to the Lodge.

In 1913, Romanzo S. Pritchard died. He had served Republican Lodge faithfully as Tyler for almost 40 years.

On May 7, 1914, the first Past Masters Night was observed and since that time has been an annual event until recently. On June 4, 1914, the Advisory Board of Past Masters was established.

On February 5, 1920, Bro. Frank Curtis delivered an historical address in recognition of the 125th Anniversary of the Founding of Republican Lodge.

The growth of the lodge had been healthy and steady since its re-establishment, but following the First World War the membership grew by leaps and bounds. In 1920 there were 11 regular meetings and 44 special meetings with 62 new members added. In 1921 there were 10 regular meetings and 50 special communications with a gain of 67 members. The meeting held on March 4, 1920, is of special interest. On that occasion there were received one application for affiliation, 12 applications for degrees, and the lodge also voted on 17 petitions and granted more time to the investigating committees on 2 others, for a total of 32 candidates acted upon, in some form, at that meeting.

On May 19, 1922, M. W. Arthur D. Prince, Grand Master, attended for the purpose of unveiling the Honor Roll of those members of Republican Lodge who served in the First World War. There was also a band to give a martial touch to the occasion.

In 1922 the lodge felt the need of enlarged quarters and a committee was appointed to secure a site for a new building. The location was decided upon and the land purchased. However, on June 4, 1925, the lodge voted to sell the property and on November 26, 1925, voted to alter the present building. These alterations resulted in providing adequate club-rooms, ante-rooms, etc., for the various Masonic functions.

On April 10, 1928, M. W. Frank L. Simpson, Grand Master, visited the lodge for the purpose of presenting twelve Veteran's Medals to the members who had been Masons for fifty years.

On September 18, 1930, the lodge voted to take the Organ Fund, which had been slowly accumulating, and purchase a new organ. A committee was appointed to secure additional funds. On October 8, 1931, the new organ was dedicated. E. E. McHaffey gave the organ recital and Rev. Bro. Dr. Arthur P. Pratt gave the Dedicatory Address.

On February 25, 1932, the lodge celebrated the 200th Anniversary of Washington's birthday. The work of the evening was performed with the officers in colonial costumes, and Bro. John W. Haigis delivered an address on the Life of Washington. During the Depression years the membership did not show any increases, but by 1940 the steady upward trend was resumed and continued well into the mid 1950's.

The 150th Anniversary celebration was held on November 1 st 1945 at the lodge at 393 Main Street. The Junior Grand Warden, Rt. Wor. James F. Watson, Acting Grand Master was received and took the East. He brought the greetings of the M. W. Samuel H. Wragg. The lodge was entertained by the lodge quartet and the history was read by Wor. Malcolm Butement. Dinner was held at the Mansion House.

The Grand Master himself was received on April 4, 1946, along with most of the other Grand Lodge Officers. Wor. Charles E. Winslow was conducted to the East, and there presented with a Distinguished Service Jewel. Bro. Winslow must have been quite a photographer for there is, in the Greenfield Town Library, a book entitled A Pictorial History of Greenfield, which is composed of photographs from the Charles E. Winslow collection. This collection is in the possession of the Greenfield Historical Society.

February 27, 1947: Past Masters Night. A plaque was dedicated to honor those who served their country in World War II by Wor. Malcolm Butement. This plaque hung on the west wall of the lodge until the move, and is currently in storage until our dream of a new lodge is fulfilled, when it will again be proudly displayed.

Wor. Leland J. Stiles, while serving as Master of Republican Lodge in 1952, felt that our newly raised brothers should have a special memento of the event. Being a silversmith, he and other Masons employed at Lunt Silversmith's created a sterling silver pocket piece containing one ounce of silver. The prime craftsman was Bro. Earl Murdock. The pocket piece has six sides and contains the Forty-Seventh Problem of Euclid. In the bottom square is contained the Square and Compasses, the next smaller square contains the Beehive, the smallest square has the Hourglass inscribed. Each square also contains a letter - F, H & C - standing for Faith, Hope and Charity. In the central Triangle is the G, and in the surrounding triangles are the twenty-four inch gauge and common gavel, the trowel, and the scythe. Two gold pocket pieces were struck. One was kept by Wor. Stiles, and the other presented to Rt. Wor. Monroe E. (Ned) Smith. Since this time every Brother Raised in Republican Lodge has been proudly presented this very special gift.

In 1953 the lodge installed an elevator in the building.

October 14, 1954: Wor. Master Herbert H. Maynard had the Degree Team of the Scottish Hiram Associates from Worcester come and work a third degree on two candidates while wearing kilts, playing bagpipes, and using broad Scottish accents.

1955: A degree team of the Police Square Club of Massachusetts conferred a third degree on a class of candidates.

Wor. Harold Phillips, in 1956, raised his two sons in Republican Lodge. Later that year the lodge journeyed to Social Friends Lodge in Keene, NH, to confer a third degree on one of our candidates. The visit was returned by Social Friends Lodge which raised a candidate of their own in Republican Lodge.

In 1957 the General Westover Square Club conferred a Master Mason Degree on a candidate in Republican Lodge.

Republican Lodge was on the move, again, in 1958, when it traveled to Mt. Anthony Lodge of Bennington, Vermont and exemplified the Third Degree on one of their candidates. The visit was reciprocated later that year when they worked the Third Degree on one of Republican Lodge's candidates.

In 1960, during the term of Wor. Louis A. Kramer, the Hellenic Square and Compass Degree Team from Brookline, Mass., exemplified the Third Degree on fifteen Fellowcrafts at Republican Lodge. The proceeds of the steak dinner were donated to St. Basil's Academy of New York, one of their Greek charities. 217 attended.

Mt. Orthodox Lodge of West Springfield visited and worked a Third Degree on one of their candidates.

Spanish Night was held on April 30, 1960. Fifty-nine members of La Universal Lodge of New York City journeyed to Greenfield and exemplified the Third Degree on one of their candidates in their own special form in the Greenfield High School gymnasium. Between 700 and 800 attended.

During the summer the lodge furniture was reupholstered in red. It was formerly blue. Also, the Scottish Hiram Associates again visited the lodge and worked their magic before 140 Brothers.

1962 again saw Mount Orthodox Lodge visiting in Greenfield and doing their usual fine degree work.

1963 saw the By-Laws changing so that officers are elected in June instead of at the Annual Meeting in October.

Mount Orthodox Lodge was visited by the Brothers of Republican Lodge, for an exchange of degree work in 1964.

In 1965 this process was once more reversed, with Mt. Orthodox visiting Greenfield and working a Third Degree of the finest quality.

1966: Twenty officers and members of the lodge travel to Jerusalem Lodge, in Plainfield, NJ, where we conferred a Third Degree on one of our own candidates. Jerusalem Lodge returned the visit the same month for an exchange of work. Mount Orthodox Lodge again visits Republican Lodge for a fraternal visit.

1968 saw Rt. Wor. Monroe E. Smith as the new D. D. G. M. The Lodge received him on his first fraternal visit along with his suite: Wor. Herbert H. Maynard, D. D. Sr. Grand Warden; Wor. James O. S. Graves, D. D. Jr. Grand Warden; Wor. Alfred D. Varley, D. D. G Treas.; Wor. George F. Berry, D. D. G. Sec; & Wor. Norman W. Whitcomb, Jr., D. D. G. Marshal.

In 1969 there were a series of meetings of the Lodges in the Greenfield 14th Masonic District with non-members as invited guests at a supper preceding each meeting. The Lodges in the District took turns at each meeting exemplifying some part of the work in each of the degrees, while the invited guests were entertained, in the dining room, by Past Masters of the Lodge.

At a Special Communication in Republican Lodge, the Most Worshipful Herbert H. Jaynes, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts and his suite were received and introduced, after which the Grand Master assumed the East. After appropriate remarks, he resigned the East to Wor. Samuel J. Yeager, Jr. who opened a lodge of Entered Apprentices, and then turned the lodge over to Wor. Eric Pell and his suite of officers from Fort Chambly Lodge No. 132, Fort Chambly, Quebec, Canada. They exemplified the First Degree on one of their candidates in Canadian form. The Canadian Ritual is quite different from Massachusetts Ritual and employs quite a bit of music in their work. They did a very fine job and their Canadian accents added to our enjoyment of the work. The Wor. Master of Republican Lodge received from the Wor. Master of Fort Chambly Lodge a very beautiful Canadian Flag in remembrance of this occasion of their visit. This memorable visit from our Canadian Brethren was preceded by a very fine dinner served in our banquet hall. The next day, Sunday, the Brethren of Republican Lodge and Fort Chambly Lodge attended services at the Methodist Church in Greenfield, conducted by Rev. Bro. James R. Duncan. Escort to the church was provided by the boys of Franklin Chapter of DeMolay. The Brethren returned to the banquet hall for a dinner after which our Canadian friends departed for their homes in Canada. Attendance at Saturday's degree work was 135. This historic event took place on Saturday May 10, 1969.

By special dispensation from the Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, a Special Communication was held in Fort Chambly Lodge No. 132, A.F. & A.M., meeting in St. Lambert Masonic Temple, St. Lambert, Quebec, Canada, Saturday, May 31, 1969. Fort Chambly Lodge opened on the 1st Degree, then changed to the 2nd Degree, and then to the 3rd Degree to receive the Most Worshipful John B. Naylor, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Quebec and his very distinguished suite. Most Worshipful Naylor expressed regrets that our Grand Master could not be present, but was happy that our District Deputy Grand Master, Right Worshipful Monroe E. Smith and Rt. Wor. George E. Clapp were in attendance. As the evening progressed Bro. Frank Westlake did an excellent job on his 2nd Degree lecture, and then he was raised to the 3rd Degree. After the Charge by Wor. Herbert H. Maynard, the lodge was turned over to Wor. Pell of Fort Chambiy Lodge. He was then presented an American flag, by Wor. Yeager, to commemorate the occasion of this return visit by Republican Lodge. Prior to the Degree work, a sumptuous dinner was enjoyed. After spending the night in the homes of our friends and Brethren we enjoyed a breakfast at the lodge and were escorted on a walking tour of Fort Chambly with visits to ancient and historic buildings and grounds. Another dinner followed, warm fraternal greetings were exchanged, and the Brethren of Republican Lodge reluctantly departed for home.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Degree Team was brought to Franklin County by Wor. Master Francis O. Hall in 1972. The Degree work was held at Mohawk Trail Regional High School in Buckland.

Regrettably, there is a period here where the lodge Secretary kept very sparse minutes and little is known other than what officers attended and what Degree work was done.

At the March 18, 1976 meeting Bro. D. Rollin Alvord was congratulated on his 61 years as a Past Master of Republican Lodge.

On March 27, 1976 Bro. Donald J. (Jack) McKinnon was raised to the third degree by the Kilwinning Scottish Degree Team in full Scottish regalia, bagpipes, and drums. It was a memorable spectacle.

A Special Communication was held on May 15, 1976 when Fort Chambly Lodge #132 of Quebec was entertained. Dinner was followed by a meeting where the Fort Chambly officers performed a First Degree on one of their own candidates in Canadian ritual. The Traveling Gavel was passed to Fort Chambly and collation was held at the French King Bowling Center where bowling was the other main item of business besides eating and socializing. The next day everyone attended church at "West Side" at 10AM followed by lunch at the Temple. Reminiscences of brothers who were at these fraternal visitations to and by Fort Chambiy Lodge remember them as wonderful occasions that widened everyone's horizons.

In September 1977 Wor. Ralph W. Semb became Master of the lodge and kept things hopping. Besides 10 regular communications he held 23 special communications, mostly for initiatory work.

December 15, 1977: The delivery of fruit baskets to elderly and distinguished brothers, and widows first appears in the minutes. This way of honoring members and widows at Christmastime has been an ongoing tradition at least since this time. Those brothers who have taken time to deliver these baskets and visit with these people have had their own lives deeply enriched. Most Brethren who participate find it such a rewarding experience that they continue it from year to year. At the time of this revision, we deliver approximately 25 fruit baskets per year under the dedicated leadership of Wor. Russell P. Kimball.

October 17, 1978: The first mention of the possible sale of the lodge appears in the minutes. The vote was to authorize the Masonic Hall Association (MHA) members to vote "yes" if the price was right. This consideration was made due to the deteriorating condition of the lodge building, and the inability of the Masonic Hall Association to meet its financial obligations. It appears that the leases of the building's tenants were such that, when the "energy crisis" hit, the MHA could not raise rents sufficient to cover the additional costs of lighting and heating.

March 20, 1980: It was voted to give $1000 to the MHA for expenses. The minutes read: "It was noted that 50% of the stock from the Commandery and York Rite Bodies was turned over to the Blue Lodge. The Blue Lodge now has 100% of the shares, and (has) one hundred percent of the votes from the Lodge Trustees. It was agreed that this step was not to destroy or disband these bodies, but to help try to rebuild and set them up on a rent basis." The building is deteriorating badly and needs a new boiler, windows, insulation, etc.

April 24,1980: "After much communication from Fort Chambly, they will not be able to attend for our annual visit. The [traveling] gavel will be returned to Fort Chambly until a further communication can be resumed."

October 16, 1980: Annual meeting. Membership has dropped this year from 303 to 287 and Bro. Ralph Semb commented on how our attendance has declined.

Sometime around 1983 the DeMolay Chapter was closed and the Charter surrendered.

December 15, 1983: The MHA needs $35,000 over the next two years to repair the building.

Rt. Wor. Norman W. Whitcomb, of Republican Lodge, becomes the new District Deputy Grand Master.

1984 saw much discussion and dissension over the proposed sale of the lodge building which finally came to pass. The MHA retained the top two floors and became part of the condominium association, but fees were too high since one body could not afford its rent, and another (White Shrine) moved to Northampton. Several changes were made in accommodations, but none proved satisfactory.

The Past Masters of Republican Lodge met once this year, but that is the last known time they met.

July 23, 1985: A special communication was held at the Greenfield Armory. The Masonic camping organization, the National Camper Travelers, held their annual outing at the Franklin County Fairgrounds and Republican Lodge had been asked to do a 3rd Degree before about 290 brothers from Grand Lodge and many other Masonic jurisdictions. District Deputy Grand Master Ronald Jackson and many other distinguished visitors were in attendance. The degree went very well and everyone learned a great deal about the differences in ritual between Masonic jurisdictions.

1987 saw Wor. Ralph W. Semb elected Potentate of Melha Shrine Temple. Many members of the Lodge go to work to help him have a successful year.

November 1987: Installation of Officers: After the closing of the lodge Wor. Russell (Rusty) P. Kimball introduced his family and then pulled a momentous surprise by having Ms. Julie White conducted to the west of the altar where he publicly proposed to her. Amidst great cheering and applause she accepted and this proved to be the emotional highlight of the occasion for all who attended.

1988: Republican Lodge finally enters the electronic age with its purchase of a computer.

During many recent years Bro. Thomas Snow provided the collation for the brethren, and they were justly famous throughout the state. His varied repasts could, and sometimes did, substitute for dinners. He served delicious stews (he was especially famous for his corn or clam chowders) or cheeseburger sandwiches prepared in his own special style, followed by large pieces of homemade pie topped with Snow's Ice Cream. Bro. Tommy passed away in November 1989, and is sorely missed by all who knew him. He not only made superior collations, but was a quiet, friendly, and dedicated brother - a true gentleman.

May, 1989: The lodge at 393 Main Street was finally sold and we moved to rented space at Guiding Star Grange at 401 Chapman Street, Greenfield. A committee was formed to begin the active search for a new Lodge of our own.

1989 also saw Illustrious Ralph Semb, Past Potentate of Melha Shrine Temple, elected to the first office in the Imperial Shrine of North America, and will he be Imperial Potentate in 1999.

December 1989: Rt. Wor. Edward F. Stange, of Republican Lodge is installed as District Deputy Grand Master for the Greenfield 14th Masonic District.

On February 24, 1991, Brother Russell H. Kimball passed away. Though not a Past Master he had spent many years in the Lodge in a variety of capacities, always providing guidance and leadership in a quiet, diplomatic and succinct manner. His leadership aided the lodge immeasurably, especially during the crisis over losing our Lodge. When the scholarship the Lodge had talked about for several years became a reality in 1994, it was named the Russell H. Kimball Memorial Scholarship, in his honor.

1991 saw the beginning of a new tradition, thanks to the hard work of Wor. Joseph W. Wagner. Republican Lodge joined with Mountain Lodge in having a joint Ladies Night for the widows of our Brothers. The ladies are taken out to a nice restaurant where they are wined and dined at the expense of the lodge.

February 24, 1992: With Republican Lodge meeting at the Guiding Star Grange and most of the properties in storage it was decided to donate the large portrait of George Washington to Franklin County. A public ceremony was held at the Court House where the picture was presented by Wor. Master Matthew A. Gaines. This portrait had hung in the lodge for about 75 years, and is now on display in the Court House.

August, 1993: The Grange hall proved unsatisfactory due to poor housekeeping, damage to lodge properties, and exorbitant rent. Arrangements were agreed upon with Mechanics Lodge to share their building and the move was made. A search is still on for a lodge of our own, but, in the meantime, we are again among true and trusty friends.

In looking forward to our 200th Anniversary, Worshipful Brothers Donald J. (Jack) McKinnon and Wor. Russell P. (Rusty) Kimball were appointed Co-Chairmen of the Planning Committee; Wor. Lawrence G. Kent to update the lodge history, and Wor. Ralph W. Semb, Chairman of Membership. Rt. Wor. Edward F. Stange, having been installed as Master for this our Bicentennial Year, was to obtain programs following meetings, thus endeavoring to include family and friends in our activities.

The celebration programs, as set forth by the committee, were:

  • February 11, 1995: Meet at Mountain Lodge in Shelburne Falls with Grand Master, Most Worshipful David W. Lovering and his suite, followed by dinner at the Oxbow Restaurant in Charlemont with music and dancing;
  • April 7 & 8: A special class of 200 candidates to be given all three Degrees;
  • June 23-25: A Wilderness Degree to be performed by the Colonial Degree Team from Marlborough, Mass. at the Country Aire Campground in Charlemont.

At this writing everything seems to be progressing well.

As we look to the future, we are still actively pursuing the goal of having our own Lodge once again in Greenfield, and restoring our membership to a healthy level, keeping the quality of members ever in mind. We hope to be a viable organization in the community, as well as presenting to this community the tenets and virtues of the members of the Masonic Order.

MAY GOD BLESS REPUBLICAN LODGE, ITS MEMBERS AND FAMILY!

The original Lodge history through the first 150 years was compiled by Wor. Malcolm Butement. No name has been given to the Brother or Brothers who added the notes of the next 25 years. The last 25 years, plus revisions, was made by Wor. Lawrence G. Kent.

Feburary 1, 1995.

OTHER

  • 1816 (Petition to Grand Lodge for a loan, declined, III-316)
  • 1821 (Report on delinquency, III-341)
  • 1876 (Presentation at Grand Lodge, 1876-138)
  • 1878 (Jurisdictional dispute, 1878-83)
  • 1879 (Jurisdictional dispute, 1879-9)
  • 1896 (Anniversary celebration, mentioned in Grand Master's Address, 1896-270)
  • 1909 (Petition for restoration of original charter, 1909-67)

EVENTS

OFFICER LIST, JANUARY 1832

From Masonic Mirror, New Series, Vol. III, No. 30, January 1832, Page 234:’’

Officers of Republican Lodge, Gill, Mass., for the current year.

  • R. Slate, M.
  • I. Bates, S. W.
  • S. Hale, J. W.
  • Joel Lyons, Treas.
  • A. Alvord, Sec.
  • G. W. Bates, S. D.
  • I. W. Sprague, J. D.
  • I. D. Battles, M. Humes, S.
  • D. Cady, Tyler.

HALL DEDICATION, FEBRUARY 1856

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XV, No. 7, March 1856, Page 141:

This is one of the most respectable and thriving Lodges in the Commonwealth. It received its Charter in 1795, three years after the union of the two Grand Lodges in Boston, and the consequent organization of the present supreme body, It continued in active operation, always numbering among its initiates and members, many of the best and most influential citizens of the beautiful village in which it is located, until the breaking out of the antimasonic persecution; when, for the sake of peace, and in the mistaken hope of contributing to allay the excitement, which was then raging with mad violence throughout the valley of the Connecticut river, it closed its doors and surrendered its Charter.

A few years since, the requisite number of its surviving members asked to have its charter restored, — a request which was readily granted by the Grand Lodge. The Lodge forthwith recommenced its labors, and now numbers on its roll nearly one hundred members! It has recently leased large and commodious apartments in the centre of the town, and filled up a spacious hall for its accommodation, in a style of neatness and elegance not probably surpassed, if equalled by any similar hall in the Commonwealth, out of the city of Boston. The fresco embellishments were executed by Mr. John Sawin, Jr., of Greenfield, an artist of much merit in his line of business. (Note: Mr. Sawin recently executed the fresco work of the Baptist Church in Charles Street, in this city, which is said to be a superior piece of workmanship; and also of the church at Newton Centre. Lodges fitting up new halls, might find it to their advantage to consult him).

A brief description of the embellishments has been furnished us. A cornice twelve inches deep is painted round the walls; above which are twenty-four panels of different sizes and shapes, alternating each other. Within these is a second cornice eight inches deep, leaving an open space of twelve by twenty feet, which is filled with sky, representing morning in the East; noon, in the centre, and night, in the West, — the whole so nicely blended and admirably executed as to produce a chaste and beautiful effect, especially when the hall is lighted. The spaces on the walls are divided into thirty five square-edged panels, sunk, apparently, two inches; within sixteen of these, are pointed as many circular-top panels, in fine elaborate moulding, throwing back the panels three and a half inches, — leaving ample room, in ten of these spaces, for the emblems of the Order. The walls and ceiling, in their architectural parts, are executed in a rich warm lint of French grey, inclining to a buff.

On Friday, the 8th February, the Grand Master, accompanied by several of the Grand Officers, proceeded to Greenfield, at the invitation of the Lodge, for the purpose of dedicating the hall, "according to the ancient custom and usages of the Craft. The ceremonies were performed in the presence of about two hundred ladies and gentlemen, to most of whom they were new, and to all of whom they were apparently gratifying. At the conclusion of these services, the Brethren of the Lodge and the visitors present, were briefly addressed by the M. W. Grand Master, in terms suitably adapted to the occasion.

The officers were then installed by the R. W. Brother J. T. Heard,acting on the occasion as D. G. Master. After which an address was delivered by the Rev. Brother William Flint, of Greenfield. This we are most happy to learn is to be printed. It occupied about forty minutes in the delivery, and was an able, eloquent and truthful exposition of the principles, doctrines, and purposes of Freemasonry. It was eminently worthy of the acknowledged talents of its estimable author, and its publication at this time is called for by the highest and best interests of the Institution. False notions are creeping in among us, which, if permitted to obtain, will jeopard the prosperity of the Order in this country. They can be best met and averted by circulating among the Lodges and Brethren more truthful expositions of the genuine principles of the Order.

The ceremonies having been completed, the company were invited to partake of an entertainment served up in the adjacent rooms. The occasion was an agreeable one, and we trust may contribute to the continued prosperity of the Lodge.

OFFICER LIST, MAY 1856

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XV, No. 7, May 1856, Page 209:

Officers of Republican Lodge, Greenfield, Mass.

  • E. P. Graves, W. M. SN
  • N. E. Babbett, S. W.
  • Geo. Ripley, J. W.
  • C. L. Fisk, Treas.
  • S. H. Reed, Sec.
  • D. Lyon, S. D.
  • A. Mitchell, J. D.
  • Rev. William Flint, Chap.
  • D. Hunter, S. S.
  • J. Rowley, Jr., J. S.
  • T. Ripley, M.

OFFICER LIST, NOVEMBER 1861

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXI, No. 3, November 1861, Page 96:

Officers of Republican Lodge, Greenfield, Mass.

  • David Lyon, M.
  • Geo. A. Kimball, S. W.
  • Kev. S. K. Jones, J. W.
  • Henry C. Willard, S. D.
  • E. J. Rice, J. D.
  • L. L. Lucey, Treas.
  • E. P. Graves, Sec'y.

OFFICER LIST, JANUARY 1864

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXIII, No. 3, January 1864, Page 96:

Officers of Republican Lodge, Greenfield.

  • David Lyon, W. M.
  • John W. Moore, S. W.
  • Anson Mitchell, J. W.
  • L. L. Lucy, Treas.
  • E. P. Graves, Sec.
  • James R. Long, S. D.
  • E. Rugg, J. D.
  • B. S. Parker and R. W. Long, Stewards.
  • E. J. Rice, Tyler.

HALL DEDICATION, FEBRUARY 1873

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXXII, No. 3, March 1873, Page 79:

The new Masonic Hall, with its apartments, at Greenfield, Mass, was solemnly dedicated according to the ancient usages of Masonry, by the M. W. Grand Lodge on the evening of the 18th ult. The officers of the Grand Lodge present and assisting on the occasion were:

The Grand Lodge was opened in ample form at about 8 o'clock, and immediately proceeded with the dedication of the halls according to the forms of the Ritual in such cases provided. The ceremonies were interspersed with appropriate music, and great credit was awarded to the excellent choir for the effective manner in which the singing was rendered.

The large hall was early filled to excess by the brethren and their ladies, and invited guests, and we take occasion to say here that we have rarely on any similar occasion, seen a more brilliant assemblage, or a more attentive and respectful audience.

At the conclusion of the ceremonies of dedication, and the proclamation by the Grand Marshal, the W. Master, Bro. Bowdoin S. Parker, read an excellent and interesting paper on the history of the Lodge from its first organization in 1795, to the present time, tracing in detail, the vicissitudes through which it had passed during the long period since its beginning. Its earlier years were attended with a reasonable success, but it was subsequently called to encounter adverse circumstances, and was finally removed to the neighboring town of Lee, in the hope that it might there meet with better fortunes. This hope, however, was not realized, and about the year 1821 the brethren surrendered their charter to the Grand Lodge, and the Lodge ceased to hold its meetings. It continued in this condition for the long term of twenty years, including the entire anti-masonic period. In 1841 the brethren at Greenfield petitioned the Grand Lodge for a restoration of its charter, and the Lodge was again organized and re-established in their pleasant village. From that time it has continued to prosper, and now numbers on the roll of its membership the names of one hundred and seventy-five active, intelligent and zealous brethren, who have not only been able to furnish themselves with new, ample, and convenient apartments for their Lodge, but have added to it a flourishing Royal Arch Chapter, Council of Royal and Select Masters, and a well disciplined and equipped Commandery of Knights Templars. Few Lodges in the State have done better than this.

At the conclusion of the reading of the interesting narrative by the Master, the company present were ably addressed by the M. W. Grand Master, and R. W. Bros. Coolidge, Parkman and Titus, when, after the singing of an ode by the choir, the Grand Lodge retired. A ball was next in order, and the brethren and their ladies repaired at once to the large hall in the building designed for such purposes, and there enjoyed themselves for a couple of hours, when they were escorted to the dining-room for supper, after which dancing was renewed and continued for an hour or two longer. The occasion throughout was a delightful one, and we believe everybody present was delighted with it. We give the officers of the Lodge as follows:

  • W. Bowdoin S. Parker, M.
  • Bro. Chas. H. McClellan, S. W.
  • Bro. C. Mason Moody, J. W.
  • Bro. Clarence F. Foster, Treasurer.
  • Bro. Wilbur F. Harding, Sec.
  • Bro. Gorham D. Williams, S. D.
  • Bro. Francis J. Hosmer, J. D.
  • Bro. Rev. John F. Moors, Chap.
  • Bro. Anson Withey, Marshal.
  • Bro. Frank R. Chapman, S. S.
  • Bro. Alfred C. Gascoigne, J. S.
  • Bro. J. Solon Clark, I. S.
  • Bro. R. S. Prichard, Tyler.

NEW MASONIC HALL, JULY 1923

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XVIII, No. 10, July 1923, Page 293:

On January 28, 1795 – over 128 years ago – the first officers of Republican Lodge 0f Greenfield were installed in Munn's Tavern on the site of the present Mansion House. Since that time the meetings have been held in various buildings until the present quarters were acquired and dedicated about 25 vears ago by a band of courageous brethren, many of whom are still with us, who considered the future was amply provided for.

Today, the Masonic fraternity of Republican Lodge together with the York and Scottish Rite bodies has, without duplication, a total membership of 1,280, and the hall is used by seven different Masonic organizations, exclusive of the Eastern Star, and the accommodation has been totally inadequate lor ceremonial, social and storage purposes.

With a charter dating back to 1795 and signed by no less an historical personage than Paul Revere as Most Worshipful Grand Master of Massachusetts at that time, Republican Lodge is the mother lodge of the 14th Masonic District, and is rightly proud of the honor.

It is very fitting, therefore, that the Greenfield fraternity should have a Masonic temple and social club bouse worthy of its position and importance, and also large enough tor its present and its increasing future leeds.

The new building is to be located on Franklin Street on the same lot with the newly acquired Masonic Club. Plans for the building have been drawn by J. Williams Beal, Sons, Architects, Boston. These plans call for a building of dignified classic design, carried out in limestone and brick, *nd will make a notable addition to the temples in New England.

The front of the building has a portico of a design based on the Greek Ionic order, the style of architecture being especially in harmony with the precepts of the order. Entrance from the portico is made through solid oak carved doors, through a vestibule into a foyer, which leads on the left directly into a ladies' reception room and on the right a secretary's office. There are coat rooms on either side of the foyer. From the foyer two separate stairs lead to the Masonic apartments above. The foyer opens into a dance hall 56' x 60', equipped with stage and dressing rooms. Between the first and main lodge floor is a mezzanine, containing a small lodge room 36' x 26' with usual anterooms and the Eastern Star paraphernalia room. From tills mezzanine there is a balcony overlooking the dance hall.

The Masonic apartments are located on the second floor with a lodge room 46' x 60' to have 231 permanent seats and space for 120 additional. In the front of the building on this floor are ample rooms for paraphernalia for the Chapter, Council, Scottish Rite, and Commandery, and a reception room and candidates' quarters. Space is provided for the organ for this lodge room. In addition to the seating provided on the floor, there is a balcony in the west to seat 125. The remainder of this floor is given over to the Scottish Rite bodies and to an Armory for the Commandery, which is 52 1-2' x 19 1-2'.

In the basement there is a banquet hall to seat from 400 to 500 and a large kitchen is provided. The services and mechanical equipment takes up the rear and the balance of the front is used by the janitor's space and a men's smoking room.

This temple will be entirely separate from the newly acquired clubhouse at the corner of Church and Franklin street, which was the L. D. Potter home. This residence, which is one of the largest and best appointed in Greenfield, has been adapted for club purposes, and will make a splendid home for the Masonic club and the social activities of the Masonic craft in that city.

The present temple has a beautiful lodge room, but the craft has outgrown the building and its lodge and social activities have been cramped for some time. The lodge room in the new temple will accommodate about twice as many as the present lodge room, and the dance hall will be more than twice as large as Grinnell hall in the present temple. With these accommodations the growth of local Masonic bodies can be cared for for some years.

GreenfieldTemple.jpg
The New Masonic Temple at Greenfield, Massachusetts
From the Designs of J. William Beal, Sons, Boston

The building committee consists of lines, William E. Dickenson, Chairman; Alexander F. Hodge, George K. Pond, Dana W. Parkhurst, James A. Gunn, Jr., George E. Shaw, Chapter No. 50, Order of the Eastern Star and Earl C. Goodnow.

The Masonic bodies interested in the new building are Republican Lodge, A. F. and A. M.; Franklin R. A. Chapter, Titus Strong Council, Connecticut Valley Commandery, K. T.; Scottish Rites, and Greenfield Arcana Chapter No. 50, Order of the Eastern Star.

200TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, SEPTEMBER 1995

From TROWEL, Spring 1996, Page 17:

Republican Lodge Celebrates 200th Anniversary

On September 28 and 29, 1995, Republican Lodge of Montaque City celebrated its 200th Anniversary in historic fashion.

The first Paul Revere chartered Lodge conducted a two day class for 43 Candidates. Forty-two of the new members are in Republican lodge and one is a member of another Lodge.

iThis extraordinary event was approved by the Grand Master of Masons, M. W. David W. Lovering and the Grand Lodge set the guidelines for the emotional two-day event.

Wor. Ralph Semb of Republican Lodge originally presented the idea of a two-day class to R.W. Edward F. Inge, Master of Republican Lodge. It was agreed that it would be an excellent way to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Lodge.

Tecause of the size of the class, the event was held in the Springfield Masonic Building. Several Lodge rooms were used simultaneously, the Grand Master, Grand Lodge officers and many Brethren from Lodges attending the Degrees. Each Candidate was presented a lire set of Masonic working tools, a Masonic Bible, and Lambskin.

At the completion of the Degrees, R.W. Jack Taub conducted an instructional period for the newly-Raised Brothers.

A delicious clam chowder was served in memory of Bro. Thomas L. Snow, who for many years provided superb collations at the Lodge. Bro. Snow had left a large bequest to the Lodge which enabled them to have their own Masonic Hall in Greenfield.

The Degree work provided an emotional experience where the Candidates became acquainted with each other. M.W. Bro. Lovering, Grand Master, made the Candidates really feel they were a part of the process, both with his humor, his down-to-earth style, and his participation in the Raising of three Candidates.

On the second day, the Candidates were Raised and received another instruction period. With the signing of the By-Laws of the Lodge, each Candidate was presented his diploma and a complimentary copy of the video, "What It Means To Be A Mason."

The camaraderie of the day continued at 6:00 P.M. at a banquet held for the new Brothers and family members.

Wor. Bro. Semb spoke on the family and Masonry. Each Brother and his guest(s) were introduced. The presentations which followed offered the opportunity to enjoy one of those warm, emotional moments which come along so infrequently in life. Many of the presentations were pins which were passed along within the family, thus continuing the Masonic family tradition. In every instance there was a great deal of love and pride expressed that the new Brothers had attained Master Mason status.

R.W. Bro. Stange reluctantly closed the Lodge and with a deep sense of satisfaction declared that this "experiment" had proved successful and worthy of repetition.

Republican1996.jpg
Pictured: R. W. Robert C. Patey, Grand Secretary; R. W. Edward F. Stange, Master; Most Worshipful David W. Lovering, Grand Master; and Wor. Ralph W. Semb; with the historic Class.


GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

OTHER BROTHERS


DISTRICTS

1803: District 7 (North Central Massachusetts)

1821: District 7

1851: District 9

1854: District 10

1867: District 8 (Greenfield)

1883: District 13 (Greenfield)

1911: District 14 (Greenfield)

1927: District 14 (Greenfield)

2003: District 26


LINKS

Massachusetts Lodges