IsaacParker

From MasonicGenealogy
Jump to: navigation, search

ISAAC PARKER LODGE

Location: Waltham

Chartered By: Charles C. Dame

Charter Date: 03/11/1868 VII-231

Precedence Date: 04/23/1867 VII-212 (Dispensation)

Current Status: in Grand Lodge Vault; merged with Waltham and Monitor Lodges to form Waltham Triad Lodge, 06/10/1988.


NOTES

This lodge was named for Wor. Isaac Parker (1802-1875); MM 1825, WM 1847-1858, Monitor Lodge; a signatory of the Declaration of 1831.


PAST MASTERS

  • Ambrose Webster, 1867, 1868; SN
  • Henry N. Fisher, 1868, 1869, 1880
  • Charles Moore, 1870, 1871
  • Leroy Brown, 1872, 1873
  • John E. Whitcomb, 1874, 1875
  • Leonard C. Lane, 1876, 1877
  • Zimri H. Cobleigh, 1878, 1879
  • Charles H. D. Stockbridge, 1881, 1882
  • John J. Glidden, 1883, 1884
  • Samuel Friebe, 1885, 1886
  • George C. Moor, 1887, 1888
  • Charles C. Byars, 1889, 1890
  • Newil W. Havener, 1891, 1892
  • Lavater W. Powers, 1893, 1894
  • Fred W. Derbyshire, 1895, 1896
  • Harbey S. Hartwell, 1897, 1898
  • Edgar F. Webster, 1899, 1900
  • William C. Henry, 1901, 1902
  • Orlov V. Moore, 1903, 1904
  • William F. Jarvis, 1905, 1906; SN
  • Arthur F. Hurd, 1907, 1908
  • George Hopkins, 1909, 1910
  • Walter W. Gough, 1911
  • Edward C. Elwell, 1912, 1913
  • Winthrop N. Crocker, 1914, 1915
  • Hiram F. Tuttle, 1916
  • Leo A. Wells, 1917, 1918
  • Fred H. Hitchcock, 1919, 1920; N
  • John W. Ekwall, 1921
  • Charles E. Hamlin, 1922
  • Richard Steele, 1923
  • Frank I. Kirkley, 1924
  • Harry B. Hartley, 1925
  • Arthur I. Derbyshire, 1926
  • George W. Furbush, Jr., 1927
  • Charles B. Janes, 1928
  • George K. Gordon, 1929
  • Ramon S. Kelly, 1930
  • George W. Baxter, 1931
  • Arthur A. Hansen, 1932
  • Carlton W. Owen, 1933
  • Frank J. Pontz, 1934
  • William H. MacKenzie, 1935
  • Dana B. Whipple, 1936
  • W. Leslie Dixon, 1937
  • Guy C. Drury, 1938
  • Matthew F. Ruane, 1939
  • Warren E. Terrell, 1940
  • C. Frank Carbee, 1941; N
  • Merton A. Hosmer, 1942
  • Ernest H. Young, 1943
  • George S. Hill, 1944
  • Roy W. Patterson, 1945
  • Philip W. Ham, 1946
  • Benjamin B. Worth, 1947; N
  • Burton W. Worth, 1948
  • James E. Faulkner, 1949
  • Warren G. Addison, 1950
  • George R. Dixon, 1951
  • Paul H. Drisko, 1952
  • Carl S. Carlstrom, 1953
  • Alfred H. Gledhill, 1954
  • Richard W. Frizzell, 1955
  • Howard P. Strum, 1956
  • Norman J. Blaiklock, 1957
  • Richard F. Olson, 1958
  • William H. Russell, 1959
  • Donald W. MacDougall, 1960
  • John T. Pugsley, 1961
  • Halvar A. Peterson, 1962
  • John F. MacKenzie, Jr., 1963
  • William A. Titus, 1964
  • Clarence M. Christian, 1965
  • Elwin H. Holman, 1966
  • Edgar I. Bittle, 1967
  • Joseph A. Boisvert, 1968
  • Jordan M. Jenks, 1969
  • Stanley C. Whynock, 1970, 1984
  • W. Richard Wilcox, 1971
  • Gerald M. Coulter, 1972
  • William M. Melanson, 1973
  • Christos D. Anastos, 1974, 1981
  • Harry E. Sneider, 1975, 1976, 1983; N
  • Phillips B. Carpenter, 1977
  • William J. Orpin, 1978, 1982
  • Richard E. Martin, 1979
  • Robert T. Bloomenthal, 1980
  • Robert C. Thayer, Jr., 1985
  • Thomas A. Sneider, 1986, 1987, 1988

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1892 (25th Anniversary)
  • 1917 (50th Anniversary)
  • 1942 (75th Anniversary)
  • 1967 (Centenary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1869 1870 1873 1880 1882 1885 1887 1889 1894 1897 1898 1900 1902 1903 1921 1927 1929 1934 1941 1950 1954 1958 1965 1967 1968 1971 1976 1980 1981

HISTORY

  • 1917 (50th Anniversary History, 1917-117; not in Proceedings)
  • 1942 (75th Anniversary History, 1942-87; see below)
  • 1967 (Centenary History, 1967-196; see below; includes notes on Isaac Parker)

75TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, APRIL 1942

From Proceedings, Page 1942-87:

by Worshipful Leo A. Wells

It is not possible, in the limited time allotted, to recount all of the interesting facts associated with the founding and growth of Isaac Parker Lodge. However, some of the most outstanding features of our history have been sought out and are here presented as briefly as possible.

The topography of Waltham had much to do with the causes that led to the origin of Isaac Parker Lodge. The area of our city is divided by the Charles River into the "North Side" and "South Side" and back in the early days, the "North Side" had the larger pat of the city's population and activities. The first Masonic Lodge in Waltham, Monitor Lodge, was established on the "North Side."

With the development of the Waltham Watch Company on the "South Side," a rapidly growing community sprang up in that section, and it is apparent that the earlier citizens of Waltham were more conscious than we are today of the River's line which separated them.

Soon an intense rivalry manifested itself between those living on opposite sides of the river. Eventually that feeling appeared among the members of Monitor Lodge. Many "South Side" members were employees of the Watch Factory, and during this period candidates from there were not always favorably regarded by the "North Side" Brethren. Two factions were formed in the Lodge and many worthy candidates were rejected by each faction in.turn.

At the meeting of Monitor Lodge, March 16, 1867, several candidates, employees of the Watch Factory, were rejected. The events following that meeting are best described by Right Worshipful Ambrose Webster in a talk he gave at the twenty-fifth anniversary celebration of Isaac Parker Lodge, and I quote:

"At the March meeting in '67 there were some rejections of Watch Factory people, and on my way home from the meeting with Bro. Leonard Greene, I remarked that I thought the time had come when a second Lodge should be started in Waltham, saying jocosely, 'I am willing to be Master, Wardens and all the brethren." The following day Bro. Greene came to me and asked me if I had meant what I said the night previous. I replied, "I did not," for I made the remark in a spirit of vexation. He said that he had been talking the matter over with Bro. Fisher and they felt about as I had expressed myself and after a little conversation we sent for Bro. Fisher and held a consultation on the subject and we agreed to invite others to join with us in a second Consultation and we three did agree that no one should be invited unless it was perfectly agreeable to all of us.

"A second meeting was held, at which there were present Bros. Greene, Fisher, Pratt, Thomas and Webster. This meeting was held in the Laundry at the south end of the case room building, in the Waltham Watch Factory, so that it may be said that the first meeting of Isaac Parker Lodge was held in this place. The subject was thoroughly canvassed and it was decided to make the attempt to start a Lodge, and others were selected to join with us. Several meetings were held and finally a list was made up of a proper number to ask for a dispensation."

The Lodge was named Isaac Parker Lodge after Worshipful Brother fsaac Parker, because of his long and faithful service to his Brethren. It is interesting to learn that the charter members of Isaac Parker Lodge were sornewhat infuenced because he was a poor man and the Lodge could not be accused of selecting the name of some man who might reward them by gifts, etc., as may be the case sometimes. This is one of the very few instances where a Lodge has been named after a living man.

Worshipful Brother Isaac Parker served Monitor Lodge as Master for twelve years. He was one of the signers of the famous "Declaration of Principles" and is credited with the preservation of the Charter of Monitor Lodge during the anti-Masonic period.

A meeting was held at Freemasons' Hall Saturday evening, April 6, 1867. Brother A. Webster was chosen Chairman and Brother Wm. H. Graves, Secretary. A petition was then drawn up, signed by eighteen Master Masons, to be presented to the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.

A committee of three was elected, consisting of Bros. Webster, Fisher and Moore, to take all necessary steps for the formation of a new Lodge. When application was made to Monitor Lodge for permission to organize a new Lodge in Waltham, every member attending the meeting refused to vote, with the exception of Brother Henry Sherman, who voted in ihe affirmative. So it may be said that Isaac Parker Lodge owed its beginning ro the vote of one man.

The prayer for the petition being granted, a regular communication of Isaac Parker Lodge U.D. was held at Freemasons' Hall on Tuesday evening, May 7,1867, at 7:30 o'clock and a Lodge of Master Masons was opened in form. Brother Ambrose Webster was appointed the first Master; Henry N. Fisher, Senior Warden; and Charles Moore, Junior Warden. The Dispensation for Isaac Parker Lodge was read, accepted and ordered to be spread upon the records, upon which, the Worshipful Master appointed the following officers:

  • W. H. Graves, Secretary
  • John Harris, Treasurer
  • Leonard Greene, Marshal
  • Leroy Brown, Senior Deacon
  • Francis Pratt, Junior Deacon
  • John Whitcomb, Senior Steward
  • Edward B. Bailey, Junior Steward
  • Charles H. Mann, Tyler

The fees were fixed at $35.00-$10.00 with application, $10.00 with the second degree and $15.00 with the third degree.

The degrees were conferred upon eighteen candidates the year the Lodge was working under dispensation. This seemed to prove that there was need for another Lodge in Waltham. Freemasons' Hall, where the Lodge held its first meetings was located in the brick building now known as the Eagle Block, standing on the corner of Main and Common Streets.

The Charter Members of Isaac Parker Lodge met in Freemasons' Hall March 25, 1868, for the purpose of electing officers for the ensuing year and for making arrangements for the constitution of the Lodge and the installation of the officers. Ambrose Webster was again chosen Chairman and Chauncey Hartwell, Secretary. The Brethren who were raised while the Lodge was working under dispensation had no vote in lodge affairs.

The Lodge was Constituted in Freemasons' Hall March 27, 1868, by the Grand Lodge and the following officers were installed by Most Worshipful Grand Master Charles C. Dame:

  • Ambrose Webster, Worshipful Master
  • Henry N. Fisher, Senior Warden
  • Charles Moore, Junior Warden
  • John Harris, Treasurer
  • William H. Graves, Secretary
  • Leroy Brown, Senior Deacon
  • Francis P. Pratt, Junior Deacon
  • John E. Whitcomb, Senior Steward
  • Edward B. Bailey, Junior Steward
  • Leonard Greene, Marshal
  • Francis H. Eaton, Inside Sentinel
  • H. F. Gerrold, Tyler

The year the Lodge was constituted proved to be a busy one - twenty-four applications were received and thirteen received the Master Mason Degree. The new Lodge also received many gifts from well wishers.

Worshipful Brother Isaac Parker was present at the Constitution of the Lodge and when called upon for some remarks, said that the use of his name had been taken without his authority and that he hoped the Lodge would so conduct its affairs as to bring no stain upon it. When elected the first Honorary Member, May 5, 1868, he wrote the Lodge thanking the members for the honor conferred upon him and saying that he hoped he would so conduct his life during the years remaining to him that he might bring no stain upon the Lodge that bore his name.

At the annual meeting on April 6, 1869, Henry N. Fisher, a Charter Member, was elected Master. Brother Fisher was not only an outstanding figure in Isaac Parker Lodge, but held many high offices in both the York and Scottish Rites. He has the distinction of being the only member of Isaac Parker Lodge elected a Thirty-third Degree Mason. Brother Fisher served the Lodge as Master during the years 1869-70 and again in 1881 and he was the only Master to serve the Lodge for three terms.

The By-Laws of Isaac Parker Lodge were adopted February 18, 1868. It is interesting to note the changes that have been made since that time. The original By-Laws provided for a Charity Fund with the Master and two members as trustees. The records were to be kept by the Secretary. (This section was changed at a later date to relieve the Master of the additional duties of being one of the trustees.) Lodge dues were set at $4.00 per annum.

In 1878, the quarters in the Eagle Block, or Freemasons' Hall, as they were called, were very much in need of repairs or alterations. Worshipful Brother Ambrose Webster was appointed a committee of one to look into the matter. After some investigation, he found the proposition too large for one man to handle as the fraternity in Waltham was constantly growing and larger quarters seemed necessary. The Master appointed Worshipful Henry N. Fisher and Brother Leroy Brown to assist Worshipful Brother Webster in conferring with a general committee from the Royal Arch Chapter and Monitor Lodge.

Soon after the organization of the general committee, a proposition was received from Most Worshipful Grand Master Charles A. Welch to erect a building suitable and convenient in every respect for the accommodation of the fraternity. This offer was accepted and the building was erected on the corner of Charles and Moody Streets, in accordance with plans drawn by Worshipful Heny H. Hartwell and approved by the general committee. Being thus assured of a building and a lease having been agreed upon for a term of ten years, with privilege of renewal, the committee turned its atteniion to the difficult task of furnishing the rooms.

At the very outset the committee found themselves embarrassed by a total lack of funds, a depressed condition of business, a strong necessity felt for economy in expenditure and a determination on their part not to invoive the fraternity in any debt. After much discussion as to the best method of raising money, it was decided to hold a festival as a means of imparting information, extending acquaintance and awakening interest in the subject. The festival was to be followed by a picnic, a subscription and a fair.

The festival, held June 13, 1879, was a success to the extent of $82.50 profit. The picnic proved to be a complete failure, owing to weather conditions and left the committee with a loss of $1.71. The fair, however, brought a profit of $2200.00. It was conducted for five days and brought support to the Lodge in ways other than to the treasury. That! the success of this enterprise was due in no small part to the ladies, is evidenced in the words contained in a part of the report of the Committee which might well be called "A Classic," and which reads as follows:

"There is a debt of gratitude, the magnitude of which can hardly be estimated, due the Ladies, who, under the Chairmanship of Mrs. Nathaniel P. Banks (the General himself being a member of Monitor Lodge) contributed a wealth of assistance to the success of our undertakings that was scarcely to be anticipated, so generously and so spontaneously was it rendered, and to it may well be attributed the splendid success of the Fair, which was so gratifying to us al. Conscious of the obligations under which we have been laid, let us so endeavor to acquit ourselves to them in the future as to enkindle no distrust in their minds as to the sincerity of this expression!"

After the above very effusive declaration, we note that when the lease for the apartments was written, it contained a clause excluding all non-Masonic societies from using the lodge-rooms. The very ladies who worked so diligently for the success of the Fair, were obliged to engage other quarters for the meetings of the Eastern Star Chapter.

Isaac Parker Lodge held its final meeting in Freemasons' Hall on December 27, 1879. After the Lodge was opened on the third degree, a procession was formed and the officers and members marched to the new Charles A. Welch Hall, which was formally dedicated by the Grand Lodge, Most Worshipful Charles Alfred Welch, Grand Master, presiding.

In 1885, the Lodge had one of the most unusual experiences in the annals of Masonry and the following account is taken from the records of Worshipful Brother Leroy Brown:

"A Special Communication of Isaac Parker Lodge was held in Charles A. Welch Hall, on Saturday afternoon, March 28th, 1885, at 2:30 o'clock, for the purpose of conducting the funeral ceremonies of our late Brother, Charles H. Bond, who died on the 25th inst.

"The Lodge was organized with the following Officers:

  • Bro. John E. Glidden, Wor. Master
  • Bro. Samuel Friebe, S.W.
  • Bro. Leonard G. Webster, J.W. pro. tem.
  • Bro. A. S. Batchelder, Chaplain
  • Wor. Bro. Leonard C. Lane, Marshal
  • Wor. Bro. LeRoy Brown, Secretary


"By direction of the Wor. Master the Lodge was called from labor to refreshment, permission to call off from day to day, until the ceremonies should be completed, having previously been obtained from the M.W. Grand Lodge.

"The Lodge then proceeded to Claremont, N. H., where at high twelve, on Sunday, the 29th, the craft were called to labor again, and with the consent of the M.W. Grand Lodge of N. H., and under the escort of Hiram Lodge No. 9 of Claremont, fifty of whose members joined in the procession, the obsequies of our late Brother were performed in accordance with our ancient and time-honored rites.

"On the return to the Lodge Room of Hiram Lodge, the brethren of Isaac Parker Lodge were called off and on Monday, the 30th, returning to Waltham, the craft were called from refreshment to labor and at 6:30 P.M. Isaac Parker Lodge was closed in form."

March 3, 1892, the Craft was called from labor to refreshment for the purpose of celebrating the 25th anniversary of Isaac Parker Lodge. The Lodge was honored by the presence of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Samuel Wells, and members of the Grand Lodge. Right Worshipful Brother Sereno D. Nickerson read the historical address. From a modest beginning of eighteen Charter Members, the Lodge had now grown to 151 members.

The twenty-five years following the celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary were prosperous ones and the Lodge was fortunate in having a succession of highly intelligent Masters who were deeply interested in their Masonic duties. Consequently, the affairs of the Lodge were conducted smoothly and efficiently. In fact, peace and harmony so prevailed throughout these years that one of our most successful Masters held two ladies' nights in one year, which is something of a record. In 1914, the Lodge was growing so rapidly that a committee of ten was appointed to act with the Worshipful Master and to confer with a similar committee from Monitor Lodge. They were to work out ideas and consider places for new and larger quarters. However, nothing definite was decided until 1920. In the meantime, the Lodge was approaching its 50th anniversary. It had acquired a membership of 383 and was most prosperous. Accordingly, it was decided thae this anniversary should be in keeping with the splendid condition of the Lodge. With this thought in mind, a committee of ten, with Worshipful Brother Edward C. Elwell as Chairman, decided that a three-day celebration should be observed. Following is a short resume of the 50th anniversary.

Sunday, April 29, 1917, the Lodge marched in a body to the Methodist Emmanuel Church where the Rev. Brother Frank G. Potter, Chaplain of the Lodge, delivered a most appropriate sermon, choosing for his theme, A Masonic Round Table.

Nuttings.jpg
Nuttings on the Charles

Monday evening, April 30, 1917, as a part of the anniversary program, the Lodge held a very successful Ladies' Night at Nutting's on the Charles, where 620 members and their guests enjoyed a banquet, entertainment and dancing.

The final meeting of the 50th anniversary was held Tuesday evening, May 1, the Lodge being honored by the presence of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Leon M. Abbott, and members of the Grand Lodge.

May 15, 1917, Worshipful Brother Hiram E. Tuttle, the presiding Master, notified the Lodge by letter that he had answered his country's call, had enlisted in the Armed Forces of our country and would therefore be unable to preside over meetings of the Lodge. His present rank is Colonel.

For the next two years and seven months, the affairs of the Lodge were conducted by Worshipful Brother Leo A. Wells. During this period, which included the duration of America's participation in the first World War, the Lodge held 70 meetings, at many of which two degrees were worked, 121 applications were received and 75 received the Master Mason's Degree.

Forty members of this Lodge served with our Armed Forces in the first World War. The Lodge voted to erect a bronze tablet in their honor. This tablet was unveiled with appropriate ceremonies May 16, 1920. Two of our members Served with such distinction that they were awarded high honors by our government. Worshipful Brother Arthur Hansen, present Mayor of Waltham, received the Distinguished Service Cross and the Purple Heart. Worshipful Brother George Furbush received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Croix de Guerre and the Purple Heart.

From December 6, 1919, to September 6, 1921, while Worshipful Brother Fred H. Hitchcock was presiding, the Master Mason Degree was conferred upon 130 candidates, the largest number raised by any Master in the history of the Lodge. The various bodies meeting in Charles A. Welch Hall had grown so rapidly that larger quarters seemed necessary. In 1920, committees were appointed from the two Blue Lodges and the Chapter to represent these bodies in working out plans for procuring suitable quarters. The Waltham Masonic Building Association was formed and the Maynard Block was purchased September 6, 1920, and thereafter remodeled to serve the needs of the fraternity.

September 6, 1927, Isaac Parker Lodge held its first regular meeting in the new apartments. January 18, 1922, the apartments were dedicated by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Arthur D. Prince, assisted by members of the Grand Lodge.

A most unusual meeting of the Lodge occurred November 17, 1931, when Worshipful Brother George Baxter welcomed the largest number of Master Masons ever assembled in this room. The Lodge was turned over to the Lexington Players, who were officers and members of Simon W. Robinson Lodge of Lexington, Massachusetts. They presented a representation of an Eighteenth Century Lodge. The drama proved most entertaining and enlightening. Their dialogues, costumes, scenes and actions reflected those early days when Masonry was in its infancy. There being no temples at that time, the Lodge meetings were held in some tavern where a private room could be found. As one followed the work, it was remarkable to observe how little the ritual has changed - a few words here and there are different, but the substance is the same. Guests came from distant points, including a large number from Bridgton, Maine. The gathering completely filled the lodge-room.

Isaac Parker Lodge has been bestowed some honors. Right Worshipful Ambrose Webster, our first Master, served as District Deputy Grand Master for the Fifth Masonic District for three years, 1884-85-86. Right Worshipful Brother William Jarvis, who was Master in 1906-07, served as Deputy in 1909-10. Worshipful Brother Samuel Friebe was presented the Henry Price MedaI in 1925 and in 1939 Worshipful Brother George Hopkins received the Distinguished Service Medal.

Three or four Brethren have rendered the Lodge many years of valuable service. Brother Atwood Jackson served as Tyler 37 years, 4 months. Brother Herman Priest served as Treasurer 31 years and eight months, without pay, although the Lodge did present him with a gold medal, emblematic of his office, at the 50th anniversary. Worshipful George Hopkins has served as Secretary 27 years, 4 months, and we trust he will continue to serve for many years to come.

Even though the Lodge does not boast of many honors, we are proud of our heritage and the quality of our membership. It is composed of the type of men that make the Masonic order a glorious institution. We shall continue to keep before us the principles of Masonry and hope that twenty-five years hence the historian at our 100th anniversary may be able to say truthfully of us, "they also served."

CENTENARY HISTORY, APRIL 1967

From Proceedings, Page 1967-196.

By Wor. Charles B. Janes.

The motto of Isaac Parker Lodge is: In Hoc Nomine Fidelitatem Honoramus, which translated means: "In this name we honor fidelity."

Let us take a quick glance at that man for whom the Lodge was named. The Historian of our Fiftieth Anniversary in 1917 was Brother George L. Ward, who said: "Of the many things that the fathers of this Lodge did well, nothing was more happy than the adoption of the name "Isaac Parker." When the subject of adopting a name came up, in consequence of the long and faithful service of Isaac Parker, it was decided to take his name. Another reason for adopting this name was that he was eminently identified with our mother Lodge—Monitor—thereby uniting us for all time by an indissoluble bond."

Let us divert our attention for a moment to the parent Lodge which was Instituted in 1820, and discontinued its meetings in 1830, due to the Morgan upheaval, and resumed in 1847.

Wor. Bro. Parker was the first Master of Monitor Lodge after her revival and continued in office for eleven years. Then, too, he was a Waltham man who contributed a great deal to the religious and social welfare of the community. Best of all, he was the symbol and synonym of fidelity to Masonry. It is said that he often walked to attend Meridian Lodge at Newton Upper Falls, and when that Lodge moved to Natick, he walked to attend meetings there, during those 17 years when the craftsmen laid down their working tools in Waltham. What more appropriate motto could have been chosen to adorn the banner which bears his likeness than In Hoc Nomine Fidelitatem Honoramus.

It is with a deep sense of gratitude that we acknowledge the efforts of our historians for the Twenty-fifth, Fiftieth, and Seventy-fifth Anniversaries. Those of the Twenty-fifth were Wor. Ambrose Webster and R.W. Sereno D. Nickerson; the author of the Fiftieth was Bro. George L. Ward, and of our Seventy-fifth, Wor. Leo A. Wells. From these histories and from the minutes kept by the Secretaries over the past twenty-five years, Wor. Brothers George Hopkins and Warren G. Addison, we have extracted some of the more pertinent and interesting features.

Fortunately or unfortunately in the days shortly after the Civil War there existed a "North and South" in Waltham, the division being then as now the Charles River; but this division was not only physical, but mental. Unhappily, there existed a feeling of superiority in the minds of one group over their neighbors to the South. In one way it was unfortunate; but in another way, it was most fortunate, because it brought about the existence of Isaac Parker Lodge. Many of the employees of the then young Waltham Watch Company lived on Waltham's South Side; and, in all truth, it must be said that they were very good, responsible citizens and Christian gentlemen.

When some of the South Siders applied for membership in the parent Lodge, they were turned down, not because of character or personality, but because they were dwellers on the South Side. When this had happened a number of times, a few of the members decided that something should be done to overcome such a sad situation.

Ambrose Webster, who then was a member of Monitor Lodge, and who later became the first Worshipful Master of Isaac Parker Lodge, and later still the first from Isaac Parker Lodge to serve as District Deputy Grand Master, stated: "At the March, 1867, meeting there were some rejections of Watch Factory people, and on my way home from the meeting with Brother Leonard Greene, I remarked that I thought the time had come when a second Lodge should be started in Waltham." A few days later, the two met again, and Brother Greene said that he had been talking the matter over with Brother Henry N. Fisher who concurred in their opinion about a new Lodge. The three later met and it was agreed that they should invite a few others to join them. No one was to be invited unless it was agreeable to each of them.

A second meeting was held at which were Brothers Greene, Fisher, Pratt, Thomas and Webster. This meeting was held in one of the rooms at the factory, so it may be said that the first meeting of the Lodge was held there. Other members were then selected to join them at a later meeting. Several meetings were held and finally a list of names was made of a proper number of Masons to apply for a Dispensation. A petition was drawn up, signed by eighteen members, with Bro. Ambrose Webster as Chairman, and presented to the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.

A committee of three members was then elected consisting of Brothers Webster, Fisher and Moore to effect the formation of the new Lodge, This application to permit the formation of the Lodge was presented to Monitor Lodge for action, and every member but one refused to vote; this member was Bro. Harry Sherman who voted in the affirmative; so it may be said that the beginning of Isaac Parker Lodge owed its start to the vote of one man.

The prayer for the petition being granted, a regular communication of Isaac Parker Lodge, U. D., was held at Free-Masons' Hall on Tuesday evening, May 7, 1867, at 7:30 P.M., and a Lodge of Master Masons was opened in form.

Bro. Ambrose Webster was elected the first Master, Harry N. Fisher, Senior Warden and Charles Moore, Junior Warden. The Dispensation for Isaac Parker Lodge was read, accepted and ordered to be spread upon the records. After this, the Worshipful Master appointed his officers for the ensuing year. Fees for the initiation were fixed at $35.00. During the first year, the Lodge, working Under Dispensation, conferred the degrees upon .eighteen candidates, proving the need for a new Lodge in Waltham.

The Lodge held its first meeting in Free Masons' Hall, in what is now known as the Eagle Block at the corner of Main and Common Streets. On March 25, 1868, the Charter Members met to elect officers for the coming year, for the arrangements for the Constitution of the Lodge, and the installation of officers. Ambrose Webster was chosen Chairman and Chauncey Hartwell, Secretary.

The Lodge was Constituted March 27, 1868 by the Grand Lodge and the Officers were installed by Most Worshipful Grand Master Charles C. Dame. During 1868 and 1869, 24 applications were received, and thirteen were made Master Masons.

At the Constitution of the Lodge, Wor. Isaac Parker made a few appropriate remarks. On May 5, 1868 he was elected an Honorary member. On April 6, 1869 Henry N. Fisher was elected Master and he held many high offices in both the York and Scottish Rite bodies, and is the only member to have the great honor of having been elected a Thirty-Third Degree Mason.

The By-Laws were adopted Feb. 18, 1868, and Lodge dues were set at $4.00 per year.

On Feb. 1, 1870 Charles A. Welch was elected an Honorary Member.

In 1878, many repairs and alterations to Free Masons' Hall were needed, and the membership was increasing so rapidly that new quarters were required. The Worshipful Master appointed Wor. Ambrose Webster, Wor. Henry N. Fisher and Bro. LeRoy Brown to confer with a committee from Monitor Lodge and one from Royal Arch Chapter relative to the above need.

Shortly thereafter, Most Worshipful Grand Master Charles A. Welch forwarded a proposition to the above committees to erect a suitable building for the Fraternity. The offer was accepted and a new building was erected at the corner of Moody and Charles Streets, plans having been drawn by Bro. Henry A. Hartwell.

Because money was in short supply, plans were made to hold a festival, picnic, subscription and fair. A profit of $2,200.00 was realized, and this success was due largely to the Ladies; doubtless members of the Eastern Star. The ladies worked under the Chairmanship of Mrs. Nathaniel P. Banks, whose husband, General Nathaniel P. Banks, was a member of Monitor Lodge, and whose statue stands proudly today on Waltham Common. However, it became necessary for the Eastern Star to find other quarters.

The last meeting of Isaac Parker Lodge in Free Masons' Hall was held on December 27, 1879. The Lodge having opened on the Third Degree, officers and members held a procession to the new Charles A. Welch Hall, which then was dedicated by Most Worshipful Grand Master Charles A. Welch and the officers of Grand Lodge.

On February 1, 1884, Isaac Parker's son, Isaac Parker, Jr., was elected an Honorary member.

On March 3, 1892, Isaac Parker Lodge celebrated its Twenty-fifth Anniversary and was honored by the presence of Most Worshipful Grand Master Samuel Wells and the officers of the Grand Lodge. From 18 members, the Lodge had grown to 151 members. During the next twenty-five years, the Lodge continued to grow and prosper under intelligent, interested and dedicated Masters, officers and members, all of whom were men dedicated to Masonry.

By 1914, the Lodge had grown so rapidly that larger quarters were again contemplated.

In 1917, Isaac Parker Lodge celebrated its Fiftieth Anniversary. By that time it had 380 members. A committee of ten Brothers was appointed with Wor. Edward C. Elwell as Chairman to plan for this observance.

On Sunday, April 29, 1917, the Lodge marched in a body to Immanuel Methodist Church, where Rev. Bro. Frank G. Potter, then the Lodge Chaplain, delivered an appropriate Sermon: A Masonic Round Table.

The next Monday evening a Ladies' Night was held at Nuttings of the Charles where 620 members and guests enjoyed a banquet, entertainment and dancing.

On Tuesday evening, May 1st, the Lodge was honored by Most Worshipful Grand Master Leon M. Abbott and the officers of Grand Lodge. On May 15, 1917, Wor. Hiram E. Tuttle notified the Lodge that because of being in active service with the Army, as Colonel of Cavalry, he would be unable to conduct the affairs of the Lodge thereafter. This duty fell on the shoulders of Wor. Leo A. Wells, who presided over the Lodge for the next two years. During this period of World War I, the Lodge held 70 meetings, 121 applications were received and 75 Brothers received their Master Mason Degrees.

Forty members of Isaac Parker Lodge served with the Armed Forces two of whom lost their lives; Bro. Walter Thomas Jensen and Bro. Harold Boynton Leach and two were decorated for bravery; Wor. Arthur Hanson and Wor. George Furbush. A bronze tablet in honor of all who served was unveiled on May 16, 1920, and is on the wall in the lobby.

While Worshipful Master, Fred H. Hitchcock was Master from Dec. 6, 1920 to Sept. 6, 1921, 130 candidates were raised to Master Mason. In 1920, because the various bodies had outgrown Welch Hall, committees were appointed by Isaac Parker Lodge, Monitor Lodge and the Royal Arch Chapter to plan for larger and more suitable quarters and the Masonic Building Association was formed. Maynard Block, Main Street, our present quarters, was purchased on Sept. 6, 1920. This property was remodeled beautifully to serve the needs of the Fraternity. The Architect who designed this artistically lovely Temple was Bro. William Gilbert Upham, and the Contractor who carried the designs into execution was Wor. Samuel Alcock. The cost of restoration was $25,975.00, which today seems quite reasonable.

No Lodge room can surpass it in beauty and effectiveness with its starry decked canopy and fluted columns.

On Sept. 6, 1921, Isaac Parker Lodge held its first meeting in these delightfully designed and furnished quarters. The Apartments were dedicated by Most Worshipful Grand Master Arthur D. Prince and the officers of Grand Lodge.

On Jan. 18, 1922, Isaac Parker and Monitor Lodges held a Special Joint Communication for the purpose of dedicating our new Temple. At 8:00 o'clock, P.M., Wor. John W. Ekwall, Master of Isaac Parker Lodge and his officers opened the communication in form. Adoniram Council and Waltham Royal Arch Chapter were invited to participate with us on this important occasion. Most Worshipful Arthur D. Prince and the Officers of Grand Lodge were escorted into the Temple by a Committee consisting of all Past Masters and Life Members of both Lodges, with Most Worshipful Melvin M. Johnson as Chairman.

On a pleasant warm night in June, 1927, Wor. Arthur L. Derbyshire, Master, closed the meeting of the Lodge, and he and his officers had walked down the stairs and stepped out onto the sidewalk just as the fire alarm sounded. In those days, the officers wore dress suits, coats, with "tails" and the Master was wearing his tall silk hat home. Arthur was a "call-man" at the Moody Street fire station. He knew, from the alarm, that the fire was located on the North Side and that the fire trucks would turn right and go East on Main Street. Consequently, he crossed Moody Street to the Common side to await the trucks. Wor. Derbyshire was the Tiller man on the long hook and ladder; so, when he saw it come speeding up Moody Street, he stepped out in the road-way, wildly waving his arms for it to stop to take him aboard. The driver stopped, and Arthur climbed up to his seat at the rear of the truck, and off they went, Arthur holding the tiller with one hand, his hat with the other, and his coat-tails flying out behind him. As for versatility, he was one moment the Worshipful Master, and the next moment the Tillerman. Such a sight, no one could ever forget.

In May of 1928, a petition was received from a number of Master Masons asking permission to open a new Lodge in Waltham. This request was voted in the affirmative by Isaac Parker Lodge and Monitor Lodge; the result being the creation of Waltham Lodge.

On Nov. 17, 1931, the largest number of Master Masons ever to assemble in our present Lodge room was when the Lexington Players, consisting of officers and members of Simon W. Robinson Lodge, Lexington, put on a representation of an Eighteenth Century Lodge in action. There were over 600 Masons present that night; and the play proved both entertaining and informative.

On Sunday evening, April 19, 1942, divine services were held in commemoration of the Seventy-fifth anniversary of the Lodge at Christ Episcopal Church. Our Chaplain, Rev. Bro. George Ekwell, delivered the sermon, choosing for his text: "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, a good understanding have all they that do His commandments," (Psalm 111.10). One statement he made was: "The strongest man does not feel ashamed to bow the knee before Almighty God. The only way to bring Peace to this Earth is to teach people to be Christ-like." This is an eternal truth. It was a wonderful sermon and was fully written in the minutes by the Secretary, and is well worth reading. We wish it were possible to repeat it here, but time does not permit it.

On April 21, 1942, the Lodge celebrated its Seventy-fifth Anniversary, the Lodge being honored by the presence of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Albert A. Schaefer, together with the other officers of Grand Lodge. On that suite was R.W. Fred H. Hitchcock, then District Deputy Grand Master for the Fifth Masonic District. The presiding Master was Wor. C. Frank Carbee, who welcomed the Most Worshipful Grand Master to the East. Worshipful Brother Frank was later to become the next District Deputy Grand Master.

One of the interesting happenings in 1947 was the election of Bro. Benjamin B. Worth as Worshipful Master, and the following year, 1948, his identical twin brother, Burton W. Worth was installed as Master, a happening not too frequent in Masonry, twin brothers presiding in succession.

The last minutes recorded and signed by Secretary, Worshipful George Hopkins, were those of the meeting of Tuesday, Oct. 21, 1952, after thirty-nine years of service to Isaac Parker Lodge. He passed away at Mountain Lake, New Jersey, on March 23, 1954, a wonderful man and Mason.

In order to fill the gap left by the Secretary's death, Bro. Frank Alcott was appointed Secretary, another dedicated Mason, who has served for a number of years as Auditor and later on several occasions as interim Secretary.

At the April 6, 1954 meeting of the Lodge, a letter from Mrs. Harold I. Eaton of Margate, N. J., and the daughter of our late Wor. Bro. Richard Steele, was read, presenting the Lodge, through her uncle Bro. Thomas Steele, the sum of $150. for use by the Lodge in its charitable work. On May 4, 1954, a motion was made and seconded that, because of his long and faithful service to the Lodge, and affirmed at the meeting June 1, 1954, R.W. Fred H. Hitchcock was made an Honorary Member of Isaac Parker Lodge.

On Dec. 7, 1954, a motion was made and seconded that a committee be appointed to confer with similar committees from Monitor and Waltham Lodges relative to establishment of a DeMolay Chapter for boys; this was carried as was a motion to have $75. paid by the Treasurer to the Advisory Board of the new Chapter. At the May 1st meeting it was voted to give DeMolay $150. for regalia. Almost from its inception Bro. David Westcott has been the Dad for DeMolay.

A resolution was passed at the May 17, 1955 meeting to commemorate the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of Rev. Bro. George 0. Ekwall as Rector of Christ Episcopal Church, Waltham, who had been our Chaplain for a number of years.

On Jan. 3, 1956, the Lodge was informed of the appointment by Most Worshipful Grand Master, Whitfield W. Johnson, of Wor. C. Frank Carbee as District Deputy Grand Master, and it may be said that R. W. Bro. Frank did an outstanding piece of work in that capacity. It was the first such appointment from Isaac Parker Lodge in over 35 years. J On Mar. 6, 1956, it was moved, seconded and passed that Wor. Frank J. Pontz be elected to become an Honorary Member; and at the April 3rd meeting, favorable action was taken. Wor. Bro. Frank has now served over 30 years as Tyler.

At this same meeting, it was proposed that R.W. C. Frank Carbee also be honored in like manner, and at the May 1st meeting, this was affirmed. "Shrine Night" was held on Oct. 16, 1956 in tribute to R.W. C. Frank Carbee, with the Aleppo Temple Third Degree Team in action. At this meeting R.W. Bro. Frank had the pleasure of being the Master on that team of Shriners and he and they had the privilege of raising Frank's son-in-law, Elwin Hugh Holman, who today is the Worshipful Master of the Lodge during our One Hundredth Anniversary year. This must have been a happy experience for both of them.

On Apr. 2, 1957, by permission of the Grand Masters of Massachusetts and the State of Washington, the great grandson of Isaac Parker, Bro. Isaac Curtis Parker, a member of Arcana Lodge, Seattle, Washington, was elected to Honorary Emeritus Membership, and at the May 21st communication, he presented to the Lodge the original Past Master's Jewel of Isaac Parker. At this same meeting, his son Bro. Isaac George Parker, who had taken his first two degrees in Arcana Lodge, was raised to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason.

On May 15, 1958, the Secretary read a letter (the second) from Mrs. Harold I. Eaton, in which she said that the Fifty Year Veteran's Medal presented to her Uncle, Thomas Steele, was an "inspiration to her," and, as a consequence, was donating $500.00 to some fund you may suggest in his honor.

On Jan. 3, 1956, the Lodge was informed of the appointment by Most Worshipful Grand Master, Whitfield W. Johnson, of Wor. C. Frank Carbee as District Deputy Grand Master, and it may be said that R. W. Bro. Frank did an outstanding piece of work in that capacity. It was the first such appointment from Isaac Parker Lodge in over 35 years. J On Mar. 6, 1956, it was moved, seconded and passed that Wor. Frank J. Pontz be elected to become an Honorary Member; and at the April 3rd meeting, favorable action was taken. Wor. Bro. Frank has now served over 30 years as Tyler.

At this same meeting, it was proposed that R. W. C. Frank Carbee also be honored in like manner, and at the May 1st meeting, this was affirmed. "Shrine Night" was held on Oct. 16, 1956 in tribute to R. W. C. Frank Carbee, with the Aleppo Temple Third Degree Team in action. At this meeting R.W. Bro. Frank had the pleasure of being the Master on that team of Shriners and he and they had the privilege of raising Frank's son-in-law, Elwin Hugh Holman, who today is the Worshipful Master of the Lodge during our One Hundredth Anniversary year. This must have been a happy experience for both of them.

On Apr. 2, 1957, by permission of the Grand Masters of Massachusetts and the State of Washington, the great grandson of Isaac Parker, Bro. Isaac Curtis Parker, a member of Arcana Lodge, Seattle, Washington, was elected to Honorary Emeritus Membership, and at the May 21st communication, he presented to the Lodge the original Past Master's Jewel of Isaac Parker. At this same meeting, his son Bro. Isaac George Parker, who had taken his first two degrees in Arcana Lodge, was raised to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason. On May 15, 1958, the Secretary read a letter (the second) from Mrs. Harold I. Eaton, in which she said that the Fifty Year Veteran's Medal presented to her Uncle, Thomas Steele, was an "inspiration to her," and, as a consequence, was donating $500.00 to some fund you may suggest in his honor.

You will recall that her father was Wor. Richard Steele and former City Clerk of Waltham.

Kilwinning Night was held on Feb. 17, 1959. Their Third Degree Team, made up of members of the Kilwinning Club, all of whom were Masons of Scottish ancestry, were dressed in Highland costumes, Kilts and all, accompanied by bag-pipers and drummers which created an interesting and colorful picture.

On Jan. 5, 1960, it was proposed that Wor. Dana Whipple, who had served the Lodge as Chaplain for a number of years, be elected to Honorary Membership, and affirmative action was taken at the Feb. 2nd meeting. He was given his Fifty-Year Pin and Veteran's Medal that same night. On Sept. 19, 1960, the Mass. Police Square and Compass Club raised Bro. Frederick Emerson Porter and Joseph Alfred Boisvert, both members of the Waltham Police Department, the latter being our present Junior Warden.

At our 1826th communication on Feb. 5, 1963, Lee Webster, the great grandson of the Lodge's first Master, namely Wor. Ambrose Webster, was raised to the Sublime Degree by Past Master, Richard E. Olson.

On Sept. 12, 1964, Wor. George W. Baxter was escorted to the East, where Wor. John E. MacKenzie, Jr., presented him with an artistically decorated Scroll as "Treasurer Emeritus" after 30 years of service to Isaac Parker Lodge.

On Jan. 5, 1965, Wor. Warren G. Addison, Secretary, read a portion of the will of the late Mrs. Frances S. Eaton, widow of our late brother, Harold I. Eaton, as follows: "I give and bequeath to Isaac Parker Lodge, A.F. and A.M. of Waltham, Mass. the sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) in memory of my beloved father, Richard Steele, and Charles I. Eaton, the beloved father of my deceased husband." She had been most gracious and generous to Isaac Parker Lodge in the past.

At the communication on May- 3, 1965, the Secretary of the Lodge, Wor. Warren G. Addison, who had faithfully served the Lodge for eleven years in that capacity, was proposed for Honorary Membership; it was favorably acted upon at the June meeting.

On this same evening, in the Banquet Hall, the members of Isaac Parker Lodge had the pleasure of listening to an interesting and challenging talk by the Rev. Father Arman Morissette, Pastor of St. Jean d'Baptiste Parish of Lowell, Mass., who is also an Honorary Chaplain of the French Navy, and a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. In the audience that night were 30 members of Waltham Council #147, Knights of Columbus, Waltham. The Pastor inspired everyone by his obvious sincerity, his love of the Common Man, regardless of race, color or religious belief, and who relentlessly fights prejudice and bigotry. It was a valuable lesson in the ecumenical spirit.

On Jan. 3, 1967, the Massachusetts Police Square Club Degree Team raised Bro. George Henry Powers in full form; the work was very well done; and the charge to the candidate was performed with great dignity and eloquence.

As Bro. George L. Ward, in his Fiftieth Anniversary History of Isaac Parker Lodge, stated: "It is gratifying to observe that, for fifty years, the two lodges, Isaac Parker and Monitor, have worked together harmoniously in furthering the Masonic Welfare of the Community." Now it may be said that for 100 years that has been the case and that for the past nearly fifty years the same is true with regard to Waltham Lodge. Thankfully, the same condition exists with the Royal Arch Chapter, the Council and the Commandery.

As for changes in the ritual, there have been none, except for refinement. The only change in Isaac Parker Lodge has been in the attire of its officers. Until 1928, the officers wore full dress-coats with tails. Beginning in 1929, it being agreeable to all the officers, a change was made to tuxedos, due to the fact that it was a much more convenient and comfortable form of attire.

In the past one hundred years, there have been 76 Worshipful Masters of our Lodge, and of that number 31 are living today. During this past year, three have passed to the Celestial Lodge above: R. W. Fred H. Hitchcock, Wor. Dana B. Whipple and Wor. Leo A. Wells. We salute them. They all were men who contributed much time and effort on behalf of Isaac Parker Lodge; men who were loyal lovers of the Craft; men who loved it for what it is and does; not for worldly gain.

Today, there are approximately 485 members of the Lodge.

It has been a tradition in Isaac Parker Lodge to hold an annual Past Masters' Night and without exception they have proven to be most interesting; the work by the "old timers" has, for the most part, been flawless. Such events have resulted in a good attendance by the Brethren. At many of these meetings, when the Master Mason Degree was worked, an interesting feature has been the appearance of Wor. Merton A. Hosmer as "the Wayfaring Man", which has added much to the solemnity and dignity of that degree.

For many years the Lodge members have held a Ladies' Night when Brothers and their wives have enjoyed a social evening with good eats, entertainment and dancing. Such an evening is scheduled for Saturday evening, June 3, 1967.

For thirty-three years, Isaac Parker Lodge had the pleasure of listening on meeting nights to the delightful music by the organist, Theodore Z. Maenche.

As Wor. Master Leo A. Wells so aptly stated in the last paragraph of the History at the time of the Seventy-fifth Anniversary: "Even though the Lodge does not boast of many honors, we are proud of our heritage and the quality of our membership. It is composed of the type of men that make the Masonic Order a glorious institution. We shall continue to keep before us the principles of Masonry and hope that twenty-five years hence the historian at our 100th anniversary may be able to say truthfully of us: 'They also served.' In all frankness and honesty, we certainly can say that they did serve and well.

On April 23, 1967, Venerable. George O. Ekwall was the minister who gave the sermon at the Vesper Service at Christ Episcopal Church as the beginning of the observance of the One Hundredth Anniversary of Isaac Parker Lodge. It was a wonderful sermon. This evening, April 29, 1967, has been looked forward to expectantly by all the officers and brethren as the Lodge is again honored by the presence of the Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, Most Worshipful Thomas A. Booth, and the Officers of Grand Lodge. It is indeed a pleasure to have you with us and we hope that you have been enjoying your stay with us as much as we have.

Looking to the future, the next 100 years, we hope and pray that Isaac Parker Lodge may grow and prosper and that the following poem may be as a beacon to guide them on their way to a brighter tomorrow, where "the wicked cease from troubling and the weary shall find rest."

"I Believe in GOD The Father
and The Brotherhood of Man,
In Gaining Light and Knowledge
in Every Way I Can,
In Cherishing Home and Fireside,
in Dispensing Truth and Love,
To Make the Mason's Home Below
Like the Eternal Home Above."


OTHER

  • 1896 (Attendance at Newton cornerstone laying, 1896-257)
  • 1929 (Attendance at the constitution of Waltham Lodge, 1929-59)

GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

OTHER BROTHERS


DISTRICTS

1867: District 4 (Cambridge)

1883: District 5 (Newton)

1897: District 5 (Waltham)

1911: District 5 (Waltham)

1927: District 5 (Brighton)


LINKS

Massachusetts Lodges


The curator for this page is Brother Scott Sherman. Please direct informational updates and questions to him.