Waltham

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WALTHAM LODGE

Location: Waltham

Chartered By: Herbert W. Dean

Charter Date: 03/13/1929 1929-48

Precedence Date: 06/12/1928

Current Status: in Grand Lodge Vault; merged with Monitor and Isaac Parker Lodges to form Waltham Triad Lodge, 06/10/1988.


PAST MASTERS

  • H. Alton Roark, 1928; N
  • Fred H. Hitchcock, 1929; N
  • Allen V. Mosher, 1930
  • William Arthur Higgins, 1931
  • George F. Hughes, 1932
  • Charles H. Morton, 1933
  • Warren Ames, 1934
  • E. P. McGuilvery, 1935
  • George W. Varney, 1936
  • Warren H. Hanson, 1937
  • I. W. Ricketson, 1938
  • Clifford M. Isaacson, 1939
  • George A. Reed, 1940
  • William G. Noke, 1941, 1942
  • Edmund F. Noke, 1943
  • Robert M. Mosher, 1944
  • Edgar J. Boardman, 1945
  • Ralph A. Alexander, 1946
  • Milroy Johnston, 1947
  • Robert L. Vaughn, 1948
  • Owen W. Semple, 1949, 1950
  • Helmer B. Kruse, 1951
  • Howard J. Abrahamson, 1952
  • Robert W. Adams, 1953
  • Lawrence D. Kingsley, 1954
  • Clarence G. Isaacson, 1955
  • Frederic J. Christianson, 1956
  • Frederick A. Woodside, 1957
  • David M. Faller, 1958
  • Howard G. VanAlstine, 1959
  • Charles W. Sherman, 1960
  • William E. Larssen, 1961
  • Russell D. Arnold, 1962
  • Charles Goldstein, 1963
  • Oliver E. Coffin, 1964
  • George R. Herrick, 1965
  • Nils E. Nelson, 1966
  • C. Robert Jingozian, 1967
  • Harvey J. Resh, 1968
  • Eric A. Johnson, Jr., 1969
  • Norman H. Poirier, 1970
  • Joseph J. Streck, 1971
  • Arsene G. Bajakian, 1972
  • R. Bruce Thursby, 1973
  • John A. Zorka, 1974
  • John H. Russell, Jr., 1975, 1984
  • Edward A. Kazanjian, Jr., 1976
  • Thomas J. Streck, 1977
  • Thomas M. Newton, 1978
  • Peter J. Kennedy, 1979, 1980; Mem
  • Robert A. Caron, 1981, 1982
  • Hugh D. MacDonald, 1983
  • Stephen A. Gaudet, 1985
  • Scott M. Sherman, 1986
  • Nicholas J. Pappas, 1987, 1988

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1953 (25th Anniversary)
  • 1979 (50th Anniversary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

  • 1929 (H. Dean; Constitution of Lodge and installation)
  • 1947 (Wragg; with other Masonic bodies in Waltham; H. Alton Roark Night)
  • 1953 (Roy; 25th Anniversary; Special Communication)
  • 1979 (Melanson; 50th Anniversary; Special Communication)
  • 1985 (Richardson)
  • 1988 (Ames; merger ceremony; Special Communication)

BY-LAW CHANGES

1940 1944 1945 1957 1963 1965 1968 1976 1985 1986

HISTORY

  • 1953 (25th Anniversary History, 1953-160; see below)
  • 1979 (50th Anniversary History, 1979-10; see below)

25TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, MAY 1953

From Proceedings, Page 1953-160:

By Brother Frederic John Christiansen.

In the middle nineteen-twenties the first floor of this building was occupied by Stone and Knight's Clothing Store. In those days it was common for several members of local Lodges to stop after the day's work to pass the time of day and discuss Masonry. There was nothing formal about these meetings. One of the topics which seemed to come up for discussion more or less spontaneously was the desirability of forming a third Lodge in Waltham. By this time there already existed the Brighton as well as the Waltham Fifth District, and most of the Lodges we now recognize as our Brethren of the Brighton Fifth were already constituted.

At about this time some figures on average attendance (as a percentage of total membership) were announced, showing that those Lodges of smaller membership usually were most successful in bringing out the members at meetings. This information seemed to crystallize the desires of the group of friends and Brothers who stopped off at Stone and Knight's for a few minutes after work. At any rate, they finally decided to move forward with their project.

Determined that their infant Lodge should not start out under the slightest hint of factionalism, they hit upon an interesting device. Each of the group was invited to propose one name; these were then voted upon by the group as a whole; then the process was repeated until a sufficient number of members was obtained. Because of the extreme informality of the original group, I have purposely avoided trying to name them all; however, you all must be able to guess the names of at least two of the prime movers in the group — of course — Fred Hitchcock and "Doc." Roark. If Waltham Lodge ever decides to celebrate a "Founders' Day," it will be to honor "Doc." and Fred for their untiring and unceasing work on behalf of the Lodge.

The duty now fell to these two to apprise the several Lodges concerned that a new Lodge was being proposed, and if successful, these older Lodges would lose to it some of their most active members. The principal victims of this exodus were naturally our brother Lodges in Waltham: Monitor and Isaac Parker. Quite naturally the announcement carried by Hiram Alton Roark and Fred H. Hitchcock was greeted with mixed feelings, but as a tribute to the strength of fraternal friendship and the persuasiveness of our ambassadors-at-large, it will be noted later in this document that both these Lodges gave not only consent, but substantial evidence of their affection, and have never ceased to be a source of strength and support when called upon.

During these early planning stages, Rev. Miles Hanson was invited to offer suggestions for a name for the new Lodge. He performed a considerable amount of study and offered several suggestions, among them "Leif Ericson," after the legend which says that this daring Norseman once visited the site of Waltham. At this point, someone proposed: "Well, why not name it Waltham?" and this suggestion was unanimously adopted. As you look around the Lodge today to see Abrahamson, Kruse, Hanson, Isaacson, Christiansen and the rest, perhaps it was just as well that the Reverend Hanson's suggestion was not followed. It is obvious that we have a small Scandinavian invasion here as it is!

Tuesday, the 26th of June, A.L. 5928, or as we more usually count years, 1928, was a memorable occasion. I wish that we might all have had the privilege of attending that first meeting. As it is, let us try to visualize the scene. It is in this very room that the Brethren are assembled for this, the first regular communication of Waltham Lodge. The time is 8.00 p.m. Gathered in the East are a distinguished group. There is R.W. Rudolph Burrough, District Deputy Grand Master of the Brighton Fifth District, Wor. H. Wendell Prout, Acting District Deputy Grand Marshal, and Wor. H. Alton Roark, our late, beloved "Doc." After a few preliminaries, R.W. Burrough speaks; he is reading the dispensation from the Grand Lodge. At last he is seating the officers at their respective stations. This is a delightful, as well as an impressive, affair. To each officer, R.W. Burrough has a few words of friendly, personal comment besides the more formal ones that are required. We feel the warmth of his personality; we feel that these are his Brothers to whom he speaks. Let's see; the officers are seated. There in the East sits R.W. H. Alton Roark: "Doc." to those assembled here. In the West, Wor. Fred H. Hitchcock. My, it seems strange to see him anywhere but in the Secretary's Chair! But he doesn't look much different. The years since 1928 have made few changes. There in the South is Bro. William A. Graham. At the Treasurer's desk, Bro. Warren P. Elliott. Across from him at the Secretary's station sits Bro. George P. Davis. Beside the Master is the Associate Chaplain, Rev. Bro. George Ekwall. (Our Chaplain, Rev. Bro. Miles Hanson, Jr., is unable to be here tonight.) Holding the Marshal's baton is Bro. Marshall Moulton. But who is that in the Junior Deacon's Chair? Yes, yes it is, Bro. Allan Mosher! The Senior Steward is Bro. Robert F. Nutting, and ah, yes! No wonder the floor work is done with precision — there is Bro. W. Arthur Higgins as Junior Steward. The Inside Sentinel is Bro. George Franklyn Hughes. The Tyler is Bro. Forrest Huntley; and hear that organ! That's right, Bro. Theodore Z. Maenche is at the console. We are sorry that our regular Senior Deacon, Bro. Edwin Pratt, is unable to attend tonight.

But now that the officers are seated, other things are happening. The District Deputy Grand Master speaks of one of our Masonic charities, and we hear this infant Lodge pledging $120 toward this enterprise. (That's about $250, 1953 Model). Next we hear kind words from R.W. Amos L. Taylor, District Deputy Grand Master from the Waltham Fifth District. Best wishes are brought to the new Lodge by Wor. John Thomson, Jr., presiding Master of Monitor Lodge. Wor. George Furbush, Jr., speaks in a like vein on behalf of his Lodge, Isaac Parker. Other Lodges are heard from with much the same message. After a brief but enjoyable address from Most Worshipful Dudley H. Ferrell, Past Grand Master, the final business of the evening is transacted and the Lodge closed in form at 9.45 p.m. That is the story of the first meeting of Waltham Lodge, A.F. & A.M., a quarter of a century ago.

From that first beginning, the activities of the Lodge settled down to a normal pattern. The first fraternal visitation occurred at the 6th regular communication of Waltham Lodge on the 27th of November, 1928. A set of by-laws was adopted and sent to the Grand Lodge for approval at the 9th regular communication, February 26, 1929.

At the 10th regular communication on the 26th of March, 1929, practically every member of the Lodge was in attendance. This was not alone because a fine dinner was served, but mainly because Waltham Lodge was host to the Grand Lodge, assembled for the purpose of officially constituting the Lodge. Most Worshipful Herbert W. Dean presided in the East and was assisted by a most distinguished company. After the Lodge was duly constituted, Wor. John Thomson of Monitor Lodge presented to Waltham Lodge a beautiful set of collars and jewels as the gift of his Lodge. Wor. George Furbush then presented the Lodge with the three Great Lights on behalf of Isaac Parker Lodge. The line officers then presented the Lodge with the implements of their offices. The following officers were then installed:

  • R.W. H. Alton Roark, Master
  • Wor. Fred H. Hitchcock, Senior Warden
  • Bro. Allan Mosher, Junior Warden
  • Bro. Warren P. Elliott, Treasurer
  • Bro. George P. Davis, Secretary
  • Bro. Rev. Miles Hanson, Jr., Bro. Rev. George O. Ekwall, Chaplain
  • Bro. Marshall L. Moulton, Marshal
  • Bro. Edwin B. Pratt, Senior Deacon
  • Bro. Robert F. Nutting, Junior Deacon
  • Bro. W. Arthur Higgins, Senior Steward
  • Bro. George F. Hughes, Junior Steward
  • Bro. Charles H. Morton, Inside Sentinel
  • Bro. Warren Ames, Assistant Sentinel
  • Bro. Theodore Z. Maenche, Organist
  • Bro. Forrest C. Huntley, Tyler

The Lodge was closed at 10.15 p.m.

At the 12th regular communication, on Tuesday, May 23, 1929, four distinguished Masons were elected to honorary membership. They were:

  • M.W. Melvin Maynard Johnson
  • M.W. Dudley H. Ferrell
  • Wor. Frank O. Locke
  • Wor. Samuel Friebe

On September 24, 1929, the first regular election of officers and their installation took place. The occasion is memorable, not only because the Worshipful Master installed was one Wor. Fred H. Hitchcock, but also because of the distinction of the team of installing officers. R.W. James Young, Jr., Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge, served as installing officer, assisted by R.W. Rudolph Burrough as Marshal. These distinguished Brethren were accompanied by R.W. Fred B. Richardson, District Deputy Grand Master of the Brighton Fifth District.

On Tuesday, October 22, 1927, the first official visitation was
paid to Waltham Lodge. The visiting officers were as follows:


  • R.W. Fred B. Richardson, D.D.G.M.
  • Wor. Joseph Earl Perry as D.D.S.G.W.
  • Wor. Roger Conkey as D.D.J.G.W.
  • Wor. George K. Gordon as D.D.G.Treas.
  • Wor. Henry A. Varney as D.D.G. Sec'y.
  • Wor. Milton F. Reynolds as D.D.G. Marshal

The Charter, by-laws, records and returns of Waltham Lodge were inspected and found in order.

To attempt to enumerate all the candidates who took their degrees during these earliest years of the Lodge would be much too tedious, but in passing, I might mention that in June, 1930, one of our most faithful members, Bro. George J. Zimmer, was raised, and at this same meeting, an application was received from one Robert H. Mosher and his brother Willard, recommended by — you guessed it — their Dad, Bro. Allan V. Mosher.

The next year finds Wor. Allan V. Mosher in the East, Bro. W. Arthur Higgins in the West and Wor. Fred H. Hitchcock where we are so accustomed to seeing him, in the Secretary's seat. By this time a young brother by the name of Warren Ames has worked his way up to Senior Steward and Bro. George W. Varney is Inside Sentinel.

It is probably of no significance whatever in this history that in December of 1930 Bro. Warren Ames trimmed all other contestants at indoor golf, but the record shows that the evening was a lot of fun.

It was during this year that Wor. Bro. Mosher had the rare privilege of raising his sons, Robert and Willard, and receiving on behalf of the Lodge on this same occasion the surprise gift of a tyler's sword from these two Brethren and their mother.

The year following finds Wor. W. Arthur Higgins in the East, assisted by Bro. George F. Hughes in the West and Bro. Charles P. Morton in the South. This being the 200th anniversary of the birth of George Washington, Waltham Lodge joined with the Brethren of Monitor and Isaac Parker Lodges in commemorating that event. Among the other highlights of the year was the privilege of hearing from a member and representative of Sinim Lodge in Shanghai, China. Another evening the Lodge was addressed by a Brother who is now the senior Senator from the Commonwealth, Bro. Leverett Saltonstall.

It would be wonderful to be able if time permitted to trace in similar detail the doings of the Lodge during the balance of the third decade. Those years of the thirties were not prosperous ones in a financial sense for a new Lodge such as Waltham, but all through the record there shines out a glowing tribute to the warmth of fraternal fellowship and of loyalty to the Lodge that inspired our officers and members during those frequently difficult years. Just as an example of the sort of effort those early officers displayed, on one occasion during his term as presiding Master, Wor. W. Arthur Higgins, confronted with the need for a dinner at a regular meeting and at the same time faced with a lean budget, went himself to the market in Boston, bought steak, carried it out on the train, draped the Master's tuxedo in a chef's apron, cooked and served the dinner. Coming Masters of the second quarter century, please note! During those years the list of visitors reads almost like a Who's Who of Freemasonry. The program material was rich and varied. This was a rich period in the life of our Lodge in all but wealth.

One of the most inspiring phenomena of our Lodge is the sustained interest shown by Past Masters. This is a continuing thing and worthy of frequent comment. On June 25, 1940, the minutes mention a Past Masters' Night at which all Past Masters were present and participating. Naturally the passage of time makes such a record impossible to keep for very long, but it is probably true today that the attendance records of living Past Masters show more faithful attendance than that of the rest of us. To them we owe a debt of gratitude we can neither adequately express nor ever repay.

From time to time informal and unusual happenings took place, as for example on the occasion of a Fraternal Visitation from the District Deputy Grand Master, R.W. Ellwood L. Overholser, on January 27, 1942. While at dinner, the District Deputy was surprised with a birthday cake, he believing no one here knew of the occasion. These small things over the years have maintained the reputation Waltham Lodge acquired at the start for being rich in friendship and brotherly love.

It was during the year 1942 that Waltham Lodge was privileged to have one of its Past Masters as District Deputy Grand Master. Just how R.W. Fred Hale Hitchcock managed to perform the duties of District Deputy Grand Master and at the same time continued as Secretary to the Lodge mystifies me, but it is all there, spread upon the records for all to read.

The Second World War made its impact felt within the Lodge, as it did in the lives of our members. Members were called into service; even the Chair of the Master had to be vacated when duty called. In March, 1944, Wor. Edmond Noke closed the Lodge for the last time as presiding Master, though happily he has occupied the East many times since as a Past Master.

During these recent years, membership in the Lodge has grown tremendously, its potential for good being increased proportionally. Certain honors have been conferred upon our members, R.W. H. Alton Roark and R.W. Fred Hale Hitchcock having received the Joseph Warren Medal for distinguished service to Masonry. As members of Waltham Lodge, we cannot but feel that distinguished as these awards may be, we must be humbled by the thought that no medal, no decoration, no illuminated scroll can possibly express a fraction of the appreciation we feel for the inspired and inspiring efforts of these two men.

We have been saddened by the loss of those of our Brethren who have joined the Celestial Lodge above, among them three Past Masters, R.W. H. Alton Roark, Wor. William G. Noke, and Wor. George W. Varney, three of our most inspired members.

If the history of our Lodge during its first twenty-five years carries a moral, I think it would be this: though times may be good or bad, peaceful or warlike, the warmth of fraternal brotherhood can always inspire the hearts of men.

If I might take the liberty of dedicating these words, I would do so: To our Past Masters — Grand Masons — grand men!

50TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, MARCH 1979

From Proceedings, Page 1979-14:

History of Waltham Lodge, 1953-1979, by Brother Peter J. Kennedy.

(For the history of Waltham Lodge covering the frrst twenty-five years, please refer to 1953 Mass. 160-167.)

"Tuesday, the 26th of June, 1928 . . . was a memorable occasion. I wish that we might all have the privilege of attending the first meeting. As it is let us try to visualize the scene. It is in this very room that the Brethren are assembled for this, the first regular communication of Waltham Lodge. The time is 8:00 P.M. Gathered in the East are a distinguished group. After a few preliminaries, R.W. Burrough, District Deputy of the Brighton 5th District, speaks. He is reading the dispensation from the Grand Lodge. At last he is seating the officers at their respective stations. This is a delightful, as well as impressive, affair."

". . . From that first beginning, the activities of the lodge settled down to a normal pattern . . . At the 10th regular communication on the 26th of March, 1929, practically every member of the Lodge was in attendance. This was not alone because a fine dinner was served, but mainly because Waltham Lodge was host to the Grand Lodge assembled for the purpose of officially constituting the Lodge. Most Worshipful Herbert W. Dean presided in the East and was assisted by a most distinguished company."

". . . Those years of the thirties were not prosperous ones in a financial sense for a new Lodge such as Waltham, but all through the record there shines out a glowing tribute to the warmth of fraternal fellowship and of loyalty to the Lodge that inspired our officers and members during those frequently difficult years."

"During those years the list of visitors reads almost like a Who's Who of Freemasonry. The program material was rich and varied. This was a rich period in the life of our Lodge in all but wealth."

"If the history of our Lodge during its first twenty-five years carries a moral, I think it would be this: Though times may be good or bad, peaceful or warlike, the warmth of fraternal brotherhood can always inspire the hearts of men."

And so, in the words of Worshipful Fred Christiansen, the history of Waltham Lodge's first twenty-five years drew to a close. Perhaps we can look at those first twenty-five years as the Lodge's initiation into Freemasonry; the years of the Entered Apprentice. If that be the case, then certainly we can consider the second twenty-five years as the years that our Lodge was passed; the Fellow Craft years. Consider these words from the Master's lecture of the second degree.

The architect began to design, and the plans which he laid down, being improved by time and experience, have produced works which are the admiration of every age.

. . . Tools and implements of architecture, symbols most expressive, have been selected by the Fraternity to imprint on the memory wise and serious truths and thus, through a succession of ages, are transmitted, unimpaired, the most excellent tenets of our institution.

And so it has been through a "succession of Ages" or perhaps, more correctly, through a succession of twenty-five years, that the Masters and Brothers of Waltham Lodge have laid down plans which have been improved by time and experience and which have been transmitted to us with care and dedication that we might be more able to uphold the most excellent tenets of our Institution.

The times have been no less trying than during our Entered Apprentice years. Consider, if you will for a moment, the closing years of the Korean War and finally the truce, the McCarthy Era difficulties, the jolt that occurred when President Eisenhower sent troops into Little Rock and the Civil Rights turbulence which followed, the Bay of Pigs invasion, the shock of the Soviet accomplishment in space, the pain of the Vietnamese War, the Watergate debacle. On the other hand, consider the positive events which inspired us all; the Salk Polio Vaccine was proven successful; Pope John XXIII convened the Ecumenical Council; Alaska and Hawaii joined the Union as the 49th and 50th states, to name but a few.

Despite all, Waltham Lodge has continued in full force continuing in the fine tradition that was established for us during our formative years.

Total membership in 1953 was 218 and say a steady rise to 285 in 1965 at which point a decline set in bringing us to a low of 196 in 1978, but with the promise of a turn around as the present Lodge officers continually initiate, pass and raise new Brothers three, four, and five at a time. During the past twenty-five years, 247 Brothers have signed the By-Laws bringing us to 533 who have committed themselves to Masonry in Waltham Lodge over the past 50 years. Unfortunately, death, suspension and demit have caused a significant loss in total membership, recalling to mind the most recent request of our Grand Master to review with care any suspension or request for demit.

Programs of entertainment following each communication have varied as the imaginations of each Master have allowed, ranging from such simple yet entertaining events as square dancing and movies, and slides of travel in Alaska, Olympic games at Helsinki, the Atomic Blast, Japan, Apollo Project, to the more exotic programs such as meat cutting demonstration, magic shows, make-up artistry by Brother Murl Daniels, science and chemistry skills by none other than Mr. Reaction, our own Worshipful Robert Jingozian; and including a special night when Brother Don Kent came by to describe weather forecasting. We casually note that Brother Don's forecasts vary in accuracy today as much as they did back in 1968 when he was a guest of Waltham Lodge.

We note with epicurean delight that the tried and true motto, "the best way to a man's heart is through his stomach", has not been ignored and find collation and dinner menus ranging from such delicacies as lobster and prime rib to the more substantial stick-to-your-ribs meals as pancakes, spaghetti and meatballs, lasagna and, of course, what would we be if it weren't for the New England boiled dinner and chicken pot pie. The record notes with apparent glee that first Armenian Shish Kabob dinner served by Worshipful Ollie Coffin and Brother Jacob Tanashian back in June of 1963 and this reporter stays content with the thought that the tradition has not fallen by the wayside.

Perhaps by coincidence, but more likely than not through careful consideration, at the June 1963 communication the Lodge was delighted by the first appearance of the Armenian Past Masters' Degree Team who were presented through the untiring efforts of Brother Edward Kazanjian, Sr. Since that time the Lodge has been the host to other degree teams, including the Aleppo Temple Officers, the Kilted Craft, the Police Square Club and the DeMolay Degree Teams, as well as the "Level Best" Degree Team made up of Senior Wardens from the Brighton 5th District; quite unusual and unique in the eyes of this reporter.

It is noted with candor that the Lodge expenses have kept pace with the inflation faced by us all. Consider the rent and light expense of $612. twenty-five years ago as compared to $1100 today, despite a declining membership. Remember if you will such communications as April 1963 when our dues were increased to $15. per year, and April 1965 when Life Membership was raised from $150 to $250., and April 1968 when application fees went from $75. to $100. and May 1976 when our dues were raised to our present level of $25. per year.

Despite these added costs to us, it is comforting to note that our Brothers and Past Masters before us have diligently maintained our property, even to the new chairs which we presently enjoy in the Banquet Hall and to the new pool room equipment purchased in 1972 and announced to the Brethren by Worshipful John Zorka, who issued a challenge to a game of pool by any concerned Brother.

This reporter notes with more than passing fancy that Waltham Lodge has not been contented to merely follow "in the footsteps" as it were, but has shown leadership and initiative in many respects. Consider if you will some of the firsts In September 1954, as a result of inspiration provided by Waltham Lodge a Chapter of DeMolay was formed and jointly sponsored by Isaac Parker, Monitor and Waltham Lodges. In September 1960, Worshipful Fred Christiansen Presented Worshipful Charles Sherman with his Past Master's Apron, this for the first time to a presiding Master. In November 1964, Worshipful Ollie Coffin started a 10,000 pennies drive to provide a scholarship for a DeMolay boy And so it has gone throughout the years with many more firsts too numerous to list.

It is with a deep sense of pride that Waltham Lodge continues to recognize the commitment and dedication of so many men Past and present who have diligently labored in the name of Waltham Lodge and Freemasonry. Consider the words of Worshipful Fred Christiansen taken from his report of the first twenty-five years:

"During these recent years, membership has grown tremendously, its potential for good being increased proportionally. Certain honors have been conferred upon our members, Rt. Wor. H. Alton Roark and Rt. Wor. Fred Hale Hitchcock having received the Joseph Warren Medal for distinguished service to Masonry. As members of Waltham Lodge, we cannot but feel that distinguished as these awards may be, we must be humbled by the thought that no medal, no decoration, no illuminated scroll can possibly express a fraction of the appreciation we feel for the inspired and inspiring efforts of these two men."

Those "inspired and inspiring efforts" of which Worshipful Fred speaks have been more than duplicated by many sincere and courageous men over the past twenty-five years. Note the bronze plaque which adorns the walls of our outer chambers presented in November 1953 in recognition of the record attendance by members of Waltham Lodge at the meetings of the 34th Lodge of Instruction. Note the testimonial dinner honoring Right Worshipful Fred Hitchcock, a founder of this Lodge, in June 1957 and in April 1962 that a 50 year pin was presented to him. Note that in May 1959 Theodore Maenche, our recently departed Brother, was presented a watch to honor his thirty years as organist for Waltham Lodge and that in December 1964, Brother Ted was elected an Honorary Life Member of Waltham Lodge. Note that in June 1965, Brother Ed Kazanjian, Sr. presented a short drama on the life of Worshipful Helmer Kruse going through the chairs of the various Masonic Bodies, and that a Paul Revere Bowl was presented to him for having received the Knight of York Cross of Honor Medal and that he was made an Honorary Life Member in October 1977. Note that Worshipful C. Robert Jingozian has maintained a similar record having received the York Cross of Honor, been installed Master of the 34th Lodge of Instruction in May 1973 with Worshipful Norman Poirier his Tyler and Brother Norman Levenson his Chaplain, and that Worshipful Bob continues in his eleventh year as Treasurer of our Lodge. Note that George Percy retired this past year after fifteen years as Organist. Note that Brother Michael Mamishian continues his sixteenth year as Tyler. Note that Brother Edward Kazanjian, Sr. continues in his post as Secretary of the Lodge to retire this year after twenty years of loyal service. And note 50 year pins going to Brothers Robert Nutting and Nicholas Redfern, and to Worshipful Brothers Robert Vaughn and Earle P. MacGillivray, to say nothing of the honor that we bestow to Worshipful Earle and Brother Nick this evening and finally, note a 65 year pin going to Worshipful Allan V. Mosher. To further note Brothers of thirty, forty and forty-five years of service to our Lodge and Freemasonry would be prolonging our ceremony. Please note, however, that we youngsters on the sidelines hold nothing but admiration in our hearts for your ceaseless energy and devotion and would only hope to be able to emulate your example.

We have come a long way since those first few days when our founders were discussing the possibilities of a new Lodge in the downstairs Stone and Knight's Clothing Store or since May 1954 when the record notes that aviation had made such advances when it was realized that the candidate, Brother Clayton Stone had been in Washington, D.C. at 6:00 P.M., and was still able to be passed to the degree of Fellow Craft that evening. And lots has happened since November 1965 when, due to the massive power failure, then candidate Brothers Robert Sheridan and Joseph Streck were passed to the degree of Fellow Craft in a lodge room lighted only by candles. And few have shared the excitement of raising not one but two sons as did Worshipful Alan Mosher when he raised Robert and Willard and most recently when Worshipful Bob Jingozian raised his sons James and David, presenting us with a spectacular evening. And few share the distinction of the coincidence of numbers as does Worshipful Master Thomas Newton, Master in our Fiftieth year and member No. 500 to sign the By-Laws.

But despite all, the ups and downs, the trials and tribulations, honor and service, and yes, perhaps anonymity for some, Waltham Lodge continues today fifty years after its fledgling beginning, in full force and with a firrm sense of accomplishment and dedication to the basic precepts of brotherhood and goodwill so deeply rooted in the history and tenets of Freemasonry. It is with a steadfast sense of love and respect that this reporter looks to the record to see that none of our pride in self and in Lodge would be evident today were it not for the Past Masters of Waltham Lodge. They have all served us well and are the constant pillars of support in our on-going program, for the reason we suspect, that only as they have advanced through the chairs to the East have they found the deeper and true meaning of Freemasonry. We must humbly and reverently remember those Past Masters who have triumphantly gone to their Celestial Home during the course of the past fifty years; Brothers H. Alton Roark, Fred H. Hitchcock, Allan V. Mosher, William A. Higgins, George F. Hughes, Charles H. Morton, Warren Ames, George W. Varney, Warren H. Hanson, L.W. Ricketson, George A. Reed, William G. Noke, Edgar J. Boardman, Ralph A. Alexander, Milroy Johnston, Robert L. Vaughan, Charles J. Melanson, Owen W. Sample, Howard J. Abrahamson, Robert W. Adams, and Joseph J. Streck, and we look forward to the continued advice, support and brotherly love which all present Past Masters so ably share with us.

As our Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration draws to but a memory, let us thank Worshipful Bob Jingozian and those present at the communication on May 1968 for establishing a Fiftieth Anniversary Fund for our use today. And may we remember with excitement and joy as well as fondness and pride, our March 10, 1979 Gala Celebration when we joined together for dinner and dance at the New England Aquarium. We are grateful to Worshipful Master Thomas Newton, Worshipful Thomas Streck, and Brother Robert Caron for their diligence in planning the Aquarium evening. Let us use the uniqueness of that event as well as the glory of the events tonight as our inspiration for the next twenty-five years as we are raised in thought, word and deed to the Master Mason's place in Freemasonry.

"The lapse of time, the ruthless hand of ignorance , and the devastations of war, have laid waste and destroyed many valuable monuments of antiquity, on which the utmost exertions of human genius have been employed. Even the Temple of Solomon, so spacious and magnificent, and constructed by so many celebrated artists, escaped not the unsparing ravages of barbarous force. Freemasonry, notwithstanding, still survives! The attentive ear receives the sound from the instructive tongue, and the mysteries of Masonry are safely lodged in the repository of faithful breasts.

"Tools and implements of architecture, symbols most expressive, have been selected bv the Fraternity to imprint on the memory wise and serious truths: and thus, through a succession of ages, are transmitted, unimpaired, the most excellent tenets of our Institution."

Brethren, so mote it be!


EVENTS

CONSTITUTION OF LODGE, MARCH 1929

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XXIV, No. 7, March 1929, Page 133:

Waltham Lodge. A. F. & A. M.. newly organized, in Waltham. Mass.. was constituted by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Herbert W. Dean of Cheshire, Most Worshipful Grand Master, in the Masonic apartments in that city. Wednesday, Mar. 27.

The officers of the new lodge are Dr. Alton Roark, Worshipful Master; Frederick H. Hitchcock, Senior Warden; William A. Graham, Junior Warden; Warren P. Elliot, Treasurer; George P. Davis, Secretary; the Rev. Brother Miles Hanson. Jr., Chaplain; George O. Ekwall. Associate Chaplain; Marshall L. Moulton, Marshal; Edwin B. Pratt, Senior Deacon, Allen V. Mosher, Junior Deacon; Robert F. Nutting, Senior Steward; W. Arthur Higgins, Junior Steward; Theodore Z. Moenche, Inside Sentinel; Forrester C. Huntley, Tyler.


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DISTRICTS

1928: District 5 (Waltham)


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The curator for this page is Brother Scott Sherman. Please direct informational updates and questions to him.