Phoenician

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PHOENICIAN LODGE

Location: Lawrence

Chartered By: William Sewall Gardner

Charter Date: 09/13/1871 1871-152

Precedence Date: 07/03/1869

Current Status: in Grand Lodge Vault; merged with Tuscan Lodge to form Tuscan-Phoenician Lodge, 05/01/1980. Now a part of Lawrence United Lodge.


NOTE ON DISPENSATION

The original petition for dispensation for this lodge, submitted on 09/01/1868, bore the name of Grand Master Gardner; according to Proceedings Page VII-486, "I refused to have the lodge so named, and the Dispensation was granted in Blank." The original dispensation, dated 07/03/1869, is written over in the Grand Master's own hand with the words: "This Dispensation not having been accepted, it is cancelled, and the Proceedings upon which it is founded are hereby declared null and void and of no effect on future applications; July 16, 1870."

PAST MASTERS

  • D. F. Robinson, 1869, 1870 (U. D.)
  • John Haigh, 1871-1873
  • Caleb Saunders, 1874, 1875
  • Thomas Leyland, 1876; SN
  • Andrew C. Stone, 1877, 1878
  • William H. Barrell, 1879
  • Andrew Sharpe, 1880, 1881
  • Octavius T. How, 1882, 1883
  • William L. Holmes, 1884
  • Thomas M. Cogswell, 1885, 1887, 1888
  • William T. Kimball, 1886
  • Parry C. Wiggin, 1889-1891
  • Alfred P. Showell, 1892, 1893
  • Fred A. Carr, 1894, 1895
  • Edgar S. Rideout, 1896, 1897; Mem
  • Dana W. Scott, 1898, 1899
  • Arthur E. Colby, 1900, 1901
  • William A. Shattuck, 1902, 1903
  • Holman J. Stanchfield, 1904, 1905
  • William H. Glover, 1906, 1907; N
  • Hollan Garth, 1908, 1909
  • Thomas L. Sullivan, 1910
  • George D. Fitts, 1911-1913
  • Otis W. Boothby, 1914, 1915
  • Thomas W. Murphy, 1916, 1917
  • Perley R. Leck, 1918, 1919
  • William E. Redfern, 1920, 1921
  • Joseph C. Saalfrank, 1922, 1923
  • Arlon C. Adams, 1924, 1925
  • Perry B. Ellis, 1926
  • James Houston, 1927, 1928
  • Daniel Saunders, 1929, 1930
  • Harry J. Bunting, 1932, 1933; N
  • Philip A. Carr, 1934, 1935; N
  • Allan J. Battershill, 1936, 1937
  • Harry B. Call, Jr., 1938, 1939
  • Herbert P. Reifel, 1940, 1941
  • George W. Day, 1942, 1943
  • Paul H. Leslie, 1944, 1945
  • A. Earl Arnfield, 1946, 1947
  • Adolph R. McLennon, 1948, 1949
  • Perley H. Locke, 1950, 1951; N
  • Richard A. Hale, Jr., 1952, 1953; N
  • William H. Redfern, 1954, 1955
  • Robert Barnett, 1956, 1957
  • Ralph L. Robbins, 1958
  • Weston D. Eastman, 1959
  • Richard G. Locke, 1960, 1961
  • Duncan S. McKillop, 1962, 1963
  • Stanley I. Kay, 1964, 1965; N
  • Alan R. McLennan, 1966
  • John H. Campbell, 1967
  • James L. DeMarco, 1968
  • Harry J. Masucci, 1969
  • Albert J. Reynolds, 1970, 1977
  • William H. Tracy, 1971
  • Philip G. Flanagan, 1972
  • Robert P. Barnett, 1973
  • Albert F. Hill, 1974
  • Harry C. Holman, 1975, 1980; N
  • Richard A. Naylor, 1976
  • Michael S. Donsuso, 1978
  • Philip G. Flanagan, 1979

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Dispensation: 1869; 1870
  • Petition for Charter: 1871
  • Consolidation Petition (with Tuscan Lodge): 1979

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1920 (50th Anniversary)
  • 1945 (75th Anniversary)
  • 1970 (Centenary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1881 1888 1891 1900 1904 1913 1917 1918 1920 1930 1935 1937 1944 1945 1957

HISTORY

  • 1920 (50th Anniversary History, 1920-351; see below)
  • 1945 (75th Anniversary History, 1945-497; see below)
  • 1970 (Centenary History, 1970-483; see below)

50TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORICAL SKETCH, NOVEMBER 1920

From Proceedings, Page 1920-351:

By Worshipful Dana W. Scott.

Phoenician Lodge, whose Fiftieth Anniversary we observe today, has been fortunate in its Secretaries. They have been able men. Two were City Clerks of Lawrence, one was City Treasurer, the others were successful men in their lines of work. As a result, the records of the Lodge meetings are complete, and we are able to read the story without a break or omission.

There is nothing unique or spectacular in the history of this Lodge. It started in the coming together of a little body of congenial men, mostly members of Tuscan Lodge of Lawrence. They were busy men, prominent in the community, who were willing to give of their time and service to help diffuse light for the betterment of their community, and this is the spirit which we believe has in all these years animated the officers of this Lodge, as it has the officers of most Masonic Lodges.

Our Charter bears twenty-five names, five of which are of members admitted while the Lodge was under Dispensation. Let me read those names. To our older members who were so fortunate as to have known them, will be recalled the faces of splendid men of true Masonic character, the strongest element for good citizenship in any community.

  • John Haigh
  • Granville M. Stoddard
  • Caleb Saunders
  • Samuel May Stedman
  • Arthur W. Dyer
  • Thomas Leyland
  • John Pendergast
  • Horatio Gates Herrick
  • Andrew Sharpe
  • William Smith
  • Arthur W. Howland
  • Cyrus N. Chamberlain
  • William Franklin Kimball
  • Jonathan D. Boothman
  • Edwin Lyford
  • James Walton
  • Henry M. Whitney
  • William H. Salisbury
  • Frederick E. Clarke
  • Samuel Barlow
  • William Stuart
  • Charles D. Moore
  • James C. Stuart
  • Lemuel Huntoon, Jr.
  • John William Barlow

Of these twenty-five men, but three are living today and retain their membership in the Lodge; Brother Stoddard lives in Worcester, Brother J. C. Stuart in Greenfield, Mass., and we are fortunate in still having with us Brother Arthur W. Dyer, our first Secretary, and it seems appropriate at this time to ask him to read to you his record of that first meeting.

The Dispensation was dated November 5, 1870.

The first meeting was held November 16, and at the regular meeting, December 21, 1870, Samuel Barlow, who will be remembered as Agent of the Pacific Print Works, was elected and Initiated an Entered Apprentice, while William and James C. Stuart sent in their applications. February 15, 1871, Brother Samuel Barlow was Raised to the degree of Master Mason, and on that evening the Lodge was presented with a fine set of silver working tools, suitably engraved with the names of the donors, which have been in constant use in Lodge work up to this present day.

February 21, 1872, was a red letter day in the history of the Lodge, for on that date M. W. Sereno D. Nickerson and a suite of sixteen Grand Officers, formally Constituted Phoenician Lodge and installed the following officers:

  • John Haigh, Worshipful Master
  • G. M. Stoddard, Senior Warden
  • Caleb Saunders, Junior Warden
  • Samuel M. Stedman, Treasurer
  • Arthur W. Dyer, Secretary
  • Andrew Sharpe, Chaplain
  • Horatio G. Herrick, Marshal
  • Thomas Leyland, Senior Deacon
  • John Pendergast, Junior Deacon
  • Cyrus N. Chamberlain, Senior Steward
  • John W. Barlow, Inside Sentinel
  • G. W. Waterhouse, Tyler

These exercises, and all the preceding meetings, were held in Tuscan Hall, at the corner of Essex and Jackson Streets. These present rooms in Saunders Block were then being fitted up, and the officers of the Grand Lodge expressing a desire to see them, they were escorted thither and after a thorough inspection declared themselves highly satisfied with the rooms, after which, horse cars being in waiting, they were conveyed to the Franklin House, where .all partook of a sumptuous banquet, followed by a pleasant hour spent in speeches and brought to a close by singing "Auld Lang Syne."

At the meeting on April 17, 1872, the following were elected Honorary Members of Phoenician Lodge: John Haigh, Worshipful Master of Phoenician Lodge; William S. Gardner, Past Grand Master of Massachusetts; Sereno D. Nickerson, Presiding Grand Master of Massachusetts; Josiah H. Drummond, Past Grand Master of Maine.

June 19, 1872, the first meeting was held in the new Temple, which was not formally Dedicated until the following September. With the fitting up of these rooms an assessment was levied on the several Masonic bodies, and Phoenician Lodge assumed a debt of $1,250.00. To help wipe gut this debt, a series of lectures and entertainments was held, and many pleasant social gatherings resulted.

Starting with twenty-five charter members the growth of the Lodge was slow, but of excellent quality. A membership of one hundred was not reached until 1887, or fifteen years after it was Constituted, and another fifteen years was needed to bring this number up to two hundred in 1902; from that time the growth was more rapid, three hundred being reached in 1908, four hundred in 1916, and our present membership totals four hundred eighty-three. In the whole fifty years we have elected six hundred thirty-nine, admitted fifty-five, rejected fifty-two, or only seven per cent, which speaks well for the quality of the applicants, and also shows that harmony has prevailed among our members and no factions have risen to disturb our peaceful working.

We have previously stated that the majority of the charter members came from Tuscan Lodge, but our first Worshipful Master, John Haigh, had served the previous three years, 1867, 1868, and 1869, as Master of Grecian Lodge. He remained in the East of Phoenician Lodge until the annual meeting in September, 1873, at which meeting the Senior Warden, Brother Stoddard, was unanimously elected Worshipful Master, but declined, after which Brother Caleb Saunders was elected.

The records of the higher bodies in Lawrence show that the first officers of Phoenician Lodge, and many of the later Masters, were active in their work. For instance, John Haigh was at the head of the Council in 1868, of the Chapter from 1868 to 1871, and of the Commandery iu 1873, and at the time of his death in 1896 he was Grand Treasurer of the Grand Council in Massachusetts. Brother Stoddard was an officer in the Council in 1868, Scribe in the Chapter in 1871, and Commander of Bethany in 1874 and 1875. Brother Leyland was a charter member and afterward head of the Council, of the Chapter in 1873, and was Eminent Commander in 1876, 1877, and 1878, while Brother Saunders was Commander in 1871 and 1872, and later on Grand Commander of the Order in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thus it appears that for quite a period of years the leading officers of Phoenician Lodge were the most prominent Masons in the city of Lawrence; and today one of our members, William A. Whitney, is Eminent Commander of Bethany.

October, 1875, Thomas Leyland was installed Worshipful Master, and Arthur W. Dyer, who had served five years as Secretary, was succeeded by Charles D. Moore. Brother Leyland was District Deputy Grand Master in 1878 and 1879, and soon after removed to Boston, where he founded the well-known house of Thomas Leyland and Son.

November, 1876, Andrew Coolidge Stone was publicly installed Worshipful Master. Unlike his predecessors he did not hold high office iii the other Masonic bodies in Lawrence, but was always active in the Blue Lodge, was District Deputy Grand Master for the District in 1886, 1887, and 1888, Senior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge in 1889, and our first member to become a 33° Mason. An able and upright Judge, a splendid type of citizen, Judge Stone was an ornament to the Bar, to his City, and to the Masonic Fraternity, as all who knew him will gladly testify.

October, 1878, Andrew Sharpe became Worshipful Master. Brother Sharpe was then a prominent dry-goods merchant in Lawrence, and had previously held office in the Chapter. James E. Shepard became Secretary. The books of the Treasurer show that the Lodge, with a membership of seventy, had a debt of $1,850.00.

October, 1879, William A. Barrell was installed Master. Brother Barrell was Agent of the Lawrence Duck Company. He was Recorder of Bethany Commandery from 1877 to 1883, and had held office in the Chapter also.

October, 1880, Dr. William D. Lamb became Master, and after his installation he presented the Lodge with candlesticks and rough and perfect Ashlars for use in the degree work. Dr. Lamb was also at this time the head of the Chapter.

December, 1881. The time of the annual meeting having been changed to December, Dr. Octavius T. Howe was installed Worshipful Master, Ex-Mayor A. B. Bruce was Senior Steward, and Lewis G. Holt, Marshal.

January, 1884, William L. Haines became Worshipful Master, and Edward B. Kelley was made Treasurer, succeeding Samuel M. Stedman, who had served from the first meeting, or over thirteen years. Because of business demands the new Master was obliged almost immediately to give up his office, and, a Dispensation having been granted, at a special meeting held March 22, 1884, Thomas M. Cogswell was elected Worshipful Master and Lewis G. Holt, Senior Warden.

January, 1886, William T. Kimball was installed, with Warren E. Eice as Senior Warden and Parry C. Wiggin, Junior Warden.

January, 1887, Thomas M. Cogswell again returned to the East, with F. S. Longworth, then City Missionary, as Senior Warden.

January, 1889, Parry C. Wiggin became Worshipful Master, with Henry P. Hopkins as Treasurer, and William T. Kimball, Secretary. The Lodge had now reached a membership of over one hundred, had paid off the bulk of its indebtedness, and was able to reduce the annual dues to $3.00. Phoenician Lodge has been unfortunate in having so many of its leading officers remove out of town. Wor. Brother Wiggin is a case in point. After serving three years as Worshipful Master, Brother Wiggin was called to Boston and now holds the important position of Comptroller for the American Woolen Company.

January 16, 1889, Brother Wiggin was given a public installation, with Adelbert C. Varnum as Senior Warden, and the venerable Captain Horatio G. Herrick, one of our charter members who had been Eminent Commander of Bethany in 1881 and 1882, was Chaplain. In 1891 William H. Russell became Secretary, and Alfred P. Showell Senior Warden.

January, 1892, Alfred P. Showell was promoted to preside in the East, and two prosperous years followed.

January 3, 1894, Frederick A. Carr was installed Worshipful Master, and George H. Merrick, Secretary. Wor. Bro. Carr was for years an important official of the Boston and Maine Railroad, in the Boston office, and many Boston and Maine engineers have been numbered among our members.

January 15, 1896, Edgar S. Rideout became Master. Wor. Bro. Rideout has never ceased to take an active part in Masonic affairs. While still residing in Lawrence he passed through the chairs of the Chapter and Council, was District Deputy Grand Master in 1904 and 1905, served as Treasurer of Phoenician Lodge for six years and Secretary for four years, and is now the Commander of St. George Commandery of Beverly, to which place he removed in 1912.

In 1898 and 1899 Dana W. Scott was Worshipful Master. Henry F. Hopkins retired as Treasurer, and was followed by Frank P. Bugbee. In 1899 the installation was a public one and was attended by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Charles C. Hutchinson. A banquet followed for two hundred persons, and since that year a Ladies' Night or a Members' Night has been held alternately each year. In 1899 Otto F. Kress became Chaplain, and has served us continuously ever since. It would not seem like a meeting of our Lodge not to find him leading us at the altar.

In 1900 and 1901 Arthur E. Colby presided over the Lodge, which was now in a nourishing condition. February 28, 1900, at the Ladies' Night, Most Worshipful Charles T. Gallagher, Grand Master, was present and made a brief address.

In 1902 and 1903 William A. Shattuck, a valued official of the American Woolen Company, was Worshipful Master. Our Treasurer, Frank P. Bugbee, having died, Wor. Edgar S. Rideout was elected to succeed him.

In 1904 and 1905 Holman J. Stanchfield presided in the East. The legal fraternity appears quite prominently in the list of candidates about this time, and in quick succession we find the names of Louis S. Cox, Paul R. Clay, Roland H. Sherman, Irving W. Sargent, and John C. Sanborn, Jr.

In 1906 and 1907 William H. Glover filled the Oriental Chair with grea,t satisfaction to all concerned. Brother Glover has filled the chairs of the Chapter and Council, was Eminent Commander of Bethany in 1915 and 1916, and District Deputy Grand Master for the District in 1918 and 1919.

January 7, 1907, the officers of Germania Lodge, of Boston, came to Lawrence and exemplified the Master Mason degree in the German language upon two candidates of that nationality, Bauer and Kirsch. The Weber Quartet assisted and a German lunch followed in the banquet hall for about three hundred brothers. May 23, 1907, at a largely attended meeting at which the third degree was worked upon five candidates, Bro. Benjamin Schreiber presented the Lodge with a silk banner which he had had made while in Japan. Upon receiving a Lodge notice in that far-away land the idea of reproducing the beautiful design of the Pillars and Globes appealed to him, and as a result of his kindly thought Phoenician Lodge treasures this souvenir.

At the Visitation, October 30, 1907, John Albert Blake, Grand Master, and suite paid a fraternal visit to the Lodge and the attendance was three hundred and twelve.

In 1908 and 1909 Hollan Garth served as Worshipful Master, and the growth and prosperity of the Lodge continued. George H. Merrick, who had so acceptably filled the position of Secretary since 1894, removed to Providence, and Wor. Edgar S. Rideout relinquished the duties of Treasurer to Wor. Bro. Dana W. Scott and became Secretary, until he in turn moved away from Lawrence in 1912 and was succeeded by W. W. Lathrop, our present Secretary.

In 1910 Thomas L. Sullivan was Master, but left the city to reside in Dover, N. H., before the expiration of the year, and was succeeded for the years 1911 and 1912 by George D. Pitts, another loyal and devoted officer of Phoenician Lodge who has always given freely of his time and good service for the welfare of this Lodge.

In 1913 Herbert N. Colby was Worshipful Master, and as he removed to Beverly, was able to serve for one year only, and was followed in 1914 and 1915 by Ora Wendell Boothby, an enthusiastic Mason who has passed through the chairs of the Council and was Eminent Commander of Bethany in 1912 and 1913.

June 16, 1915, the Lodge had as guests the officers and members of Mount Olivet Lodge, of Cambridge, Mass., who exemplified parts of the third degree in the presence of two hundred and fifty members, and presented the Lodge with a Gavel as a souvenir of the occasion.

In 1916 and 1917 Thomas W. Murphy was Master. January 16, 1916, a Military night was observed, when Capt. Daniel C. Smith of the eighth infantry was given his third degree, with Captain Frederick G. Bauer, of Eliot Lodge, Jamaica Plain, in the East, and the other chairs filled by military officers in full uniform. Over four hundred sat at the banquet which followed the work. April 4, 1917, R. W. Bro. William H. Glover presented the Lodge with a beautiful silk American flag as a token of goodwill and affection. During Wor. Bro. Murphy's term the campaign for a new Temple was undertaken. Phoenician Lodge was at that time out of debt and had an invested balance of about two thousand dollars, and this sum was voted as a donation to the cause.

In 1918 and 1919 Perley R. Leek presided. Our Senior Warden, Herbert M. Abbott, and many of our members, went to France. The dues of all such were remitted and every encouragement given their patriotic endeavors.

1920 William E. Redfern serves us as Master, and in common with most other Lodges, finds many candidates knocking at the door for admittance.

June 9, 1920, about one hundred of our members journeyed in automobiles to the Masonic Home at Charlton and worked the third degree upon five candidates, paying a fraternal visit to our Bro. John Tempest, who has for several years been a resident.

Such, in brief, are the simple annals of the activities of this Lodge. It has been customary each year to have a Past Master's Night, and we have usually joined the two other Lodges in attending church one Sunday each year in a body. Although we are fifty years old, we are still the youngest Masonic Lodge in the city.

In this fifty years the city has grown from less than twenty-nine thousand to about one hundred thousand people, and our Lodge membership has increased greatly. Two-thirds of our citizens came from across the water, many with ideas out of harmony with the teachings of Masonry, In such a community there is great need for an organization such as ours, where there is ever an open Bible upon the altar, and where the youngest Entered Apprentice finds himself gazing upon the folds of the American Flag; these symbolize our teachings — Morality based upon the Bible, and Patriotism. May God help us to keep the Faith.

75TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORICAL SKETCH, DECEMBER 1945

From Proceedings, Page 1945-497:

By Worshipful James Houston.

There is nothing unique or spectacular in the history of this Lodge. It started in the coming together of a little body of congenial men, mostly members of Tuscan Lodge of Lawrence. They were busy men, prominent in the community, who were willing to give of their time and service to help diffuse light for the betterment of their community, and this is the spirit which we believe has in all these years animated the officers of this Lodge, as it has the officers of most Masonic Lodges.

Our Charter bears twenty-five names, five of which are of members admitted while the Lodge was under dispensation. Let me read those names. John Haigh, Granville M. Stoddard, Caleb Saunders, Samuel May Stedman, Arthur W. Dyer, Thomas Leyland, John Pendergast, Horatio Gates Herrick, Andrew Sharpe, William Smith, Arthur W. Howland, Cyrus N. Chamberlain, John William Barlow, William Franklin Kimball, Jonathan D. Boothman, Edwin Lyford, James Walton, Henry M. Whitney, William H. Salisbury, Frederick E. Clarke, Samuel Barlow, William Stuart, Charles D. Moore, James C. Stuart and Lemuel Huntoon, Jr.

Brother Arthur W. Dyer was our first Secretary and the following is taken from the records of the first meeting:

The Dispensation was dated November 5, 1870. The first meeting was held November 16 and at the regular meeting December 21, 1870, Samuel Barlow, who was Agent of the Pacific Print Works, was elected and initiated an Entered Apprentice, while William and James C. Stuart sent in their applications. February 15, 1871, Brother Samuel Barlow was raised to the degree of Master Mason, and on that evening, the Lodge was presented with a fine set of silver working tools, suitably engraved with the names of the donors, which have been in constant use in Lodge work up to this present day.

February 21, 1872, was a red letter day in the history of the Lodge, for on that date Most Worshipful Sereno D. Nickerson and a Suite of sixteen Grand Officers formally constituted Phoenician Lodge and installed the following officers:

  • John Haigh, Worshipful Master
  • G. M. Stoddard, Senior Warden
  • Caleb Saunders, Junior Warden
  • Samuel M. Stedman, Treasurer
  • Arthur W. Dyer, Secretary
  • Andrew Sharpe, Chaplain
  • Horatio G. Herrick, Marshal
  • Thomas Levland, Senior Deacon
  • John Pendergast, Junior Deacon
  • Cyrus N. Chamberlain, Senior Steward
  • John W. Barlow, Inside Sentinel
  • G. W. Waterhouse, Tyler

These exercises, and all the preceding meetings, were held in Tuscan Hall at the corner of Essex and Jackson Streets. These present rooms in Saunders Block were then being fitted up, and the officers of the Grand Lodge expressing a desire to see them, they were escorted thither, and after a thorough inspection, declared themselves highly satisfied with the rooms, after which, horse cars being in waiting, they were conveyed to the Franklin House where all partook of a sumptuous banquet, followed by a pleasant hour spent in speeches and brought to a close by singing "Auld Lang Syne."

At the meeting on April 17, 1872, the following were elected Honorary members of Phoenician Lodge: John Haigh, Worshipful Master of Phoenician Lodge; William S. Gardner, Past Grand Master of Massachusetts; Sereno D. Nickerson, present Grand Master of Massachusetts; J. H. Drummond, Past Grand Master of Maine.

June 19, 1872, the first meeting was held in the new Temple, which was not formally dedicated until the following September. With the fitting up of these rooms an assessment was levied on the several Masonic bodies and Phoenician Lodge assumed a debt of $1250.00. To help wipe out this debt, a series of lectures and entertainments were held and pleasant social gatherings resulted.

Starting with twenty-five charter members, the growth of the Lodge was slow, but of excellent quality. A membership of one hundred was not reached until 1887, or fifteen years after it was constituted, and another fifteen years was needed to bring the number up to two hundred in 1902; from that time the growth was more rapid.

We have previously stated that the majority of the charter members came from Tuscan Lodge, but our first Worshipful Master, John Haigh, had served the previous three years, 1867, 1868 and 1869, as Master of Grecian Lodge. He remained in the East of Phoenician Lodge until the annual meeting in September, 1873, at which time the Senior Warden, Brother Stoddard, was unanimously elected Worshipful Master, but declined, after which Brother Caleb Saunders was elected.

The records of the higher bodies in Lawrence show that the first officers of Phoenician Lodge, and many of the later Masters, were active in their work, for instance John Haigh was at the head of the Council in 1868, of the Chapter from 1868 to 1871, and of the Commandery in 1873, and at the time of his death in 1896, he was Grand Treasurer of the Grand Council, R.& S.M., of Massachusetts. Brother Stoddard was an officer in the Council in 1868, Scribe in the Chapter in 1871, and Commander of Bethany Commandery in 1874-5. Brother Leyland was a charter member and afterwards head of the Council, of the Chapter in 1873, and was Eminent Commander in 1876, 1877 and 1878, while Brother Saunders was Commander in 1871-2, and Grand Commander of Massachusetts and Rhode Island 1882-83. Thus it appears that for quite a period of years the leading officers of Phoenician Lodge were the most prominent Vlasons in the City of Lawrence.

October, 1875, Thomas Leyland was installed Worshipful Master and Arthur W. Dyer, who had served five years as Secretary, was succeeded by Charles D. Moore. Brother Leyland was District Deputy Grand Master in 1878-9 and soon after removed to Boston, where he founded the well-known house of Thomas Leyland & Son.

November, 1876, Andrew Coolidge Stone was publicly installed Worshipful Master. Unlike his predecessors, he did not hold high office in the other Masonic bodies in Lawrence, but was always active in the Blue Lodge; was District Deputy Grand Master in 1886-7; Senior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge in 1889, and our first member to become a Thirty-third degree Mason. An able and upright Judge, a splendid type of citizen, Judge Stone was a credit to the Bar, to his City and to the Masonic Fraternity.

October, 1878, Andrew Sharpe became Worshipful Master. Brother Sharpe was then a prominent dry-goods merchant in Lawrence, and had previously held office in the Chapter. James E. Shepard became Secretary.

October, 1879, William A. Barrell was installed Master. Brother Barrell was Agent of the Lawrence Duck Co. He was Recorder for Bethany Commandery from 1877 to 1883 and had held office in the Chapter.

October 1880, Dr. William D. Lamb became Master, and after his installation, he presented the Lodge with candlesticks and rough and perfect Ashlars for use in the degree work. Dr. Lamb was at this time also High Priest of the Chapter.

December 1881, the time of the annual meeting having been changed to December, Dr. Octavius T. Howe was installed Worshipful Master; Ex-Mayor A. B. Bruce was Senior Steward and Lewis G. Holt, Marshal.

January 1884, William L. Haines became Worshipful Master and Edward B. Kelley was made Treasurer, succeeding Samuel M. Stedman, who had served from the first meeting, or over thirteen years. Because of business demands, the new Master was obliged almost immediately to give up his office, and a dispensation having been granted, at a special meeting held March 22, 1884, Thomas M. Cogswell was elected Worshipful Master and Lewis G. Holt, Senior Warden.

January 1886, William T. Kimball was installed, with Warren E. Rice as Senior Warden and Parry C. Wiggin, Junior Warden.

January 1887, Thomas H. Cogswell again returned to the East, with F. S. Longworth, then City Missionary, as Senior Warden.

January 1889, Parry C. Wiggin became Worshipful Master, with Henry F. Hopkins as Treasurer and William T. Kimball as Secretary. The Lodge had now reached a membership of over one hundred and had paid off the bulk of its indebtedness.

Phoenician Lodge has been unfortunate in having so many of its leading officers remove out of town. Wor. Brother Wiggin is a case in point. After serving three years as Master, Brother Wiggin was called to Boston as Comptroller for the American Woolen Co.

January 16,1889, Brother Wiggin was given a public installation, with Adelbert C. Varnum as Senior Warden and the venerable Captain Horatio G. Herrick, one of our charter members who had been Eminent Commander of Bethany Commandery in 1881-2, was Chaplain. In 1891 William H. Russell became Secretary and Alfred P. Showell, Senior Warden.

January 1892, Alfred P. Showell was promoted to preside in the East and two prosperous years followed.

January 3, 1894, Frederick A. Carr was installed Worshipful Master and George H. Merrick, Secretary. Wor. Brother Carr was for years an important official of the Boston & Maine Railroad, in the Boston office, and many B. & M. engineers have been numbered among our members.

January 15, 1896, Edgar S. Rideout became Master. Wor. Brother Rideout has never ceased to take an active part in Masonic affairs. While still residing in Lawrence, he passed through the chairs of the Chapter and Council; was District Deputy Grand Master in 1904-5; served as Treasurer of Phoenician Lodge for six years and Secretary for four years.

In 1898-9 Dana W. Scott was Worshipful Master. Henry F. Hopkins retired as Treasurer and was followed by Frank P. Bugbee. In 1899 the installation was a public one and was attended by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Charles C. Hutchinson. A banquet followed, at which two hundred people were seated, and since that year, a Ladies' Night or a Members' Night has been held alternately each year. In 1899 Otto F. Kress became Chaplain.

In 1900-1, Arthur E. Colby presided over the Lodge, which was now in a flourishing condition. February 28, 1900, at the Ladies' Night, Most Worshipful Charles T. Gallagher, Grand Master, was present and made a brief address.

In 1902-3, William A. Shattuck, a valued official of the American Woolen Co. was Worshipful Master. Our Treasurer, Frank P. Bugbee, having died, Wor. Edgar S. Rideout was elected to succeed him.

In 1904-5, Holman J. Stanchfield presided in the East. The legal fraternity appears quite prominently in the list of candidates about this time, and in quick succession, we find the names of Louis S. Cox, Paul R. Clay, Roland H. Sherman, Irving W. Sargent and John Sanborn, Jr. In 1906-7, William H. Glover filled the oriental chair with great satisfaction to all concerned. Brother Glover has filled the chairs of the Chapter and Council; was Eminent Commander of Bethany Commandery in 1915-16 and District Deputy Grand Master of the district in 1918-19. January 7, 1907, the officers of Germania Lodge of Boston came to Lawrence and exemplified the Master Mason Degree in the German language upon two candidates of that nationality—Bauer and Kirsch. The Weber Quartet assisted and a German lunch followed in the banquet hall to about three hundred Brothers. May 23, 1907, at a largely attended meeting, the third degree was conferred upon five candidates. Bro. Benjamin Schreiber presented the Lodge with a silk banner which he had made while in Japan. Lipon receiving a Lodge notice in that far-away land, the idea of reproducing the beautiful design of the Pillars and Globes appealed to him, and as a result of his kindly thought, Phoenician Lodge treasures this souvenir.

At the visitation October 30, 1907, John Albert Blake, Most Worshipful Grand Master, and his Suite, paid a fraternal visit to the Lodge and the attendance was 312.

In 1908-9 Hollas Garth served as Worshipful Master and the growth and prosperity of the Lodge continued. George H. Merrick, who had so acceptably filled the position of Secretary since 1894, removed to Providence, and Wor. Edgar S. Rideout relinquished the duties of Treasurer to Wor. Brother Dana W. Scott and became Secretary, until he in turn moved from Lawrence in 1912, and was succeeded by W. W. Lathrop. In 1910, Thomas L. Sullivan was Master, but left the City to reside in Dover, New Hampshire, before the expiration of the year. He was succeeded in 1911-12 by George D. Fitts, another loyal and devoted officer of Phoenician Lodge, who had always given freely of his time and good service for the welfare of this Lodge.

In 1913, Herbert N. Colby was Worshipful Master, and as he removed to Beverly, was able to serve for one year only.

Brother Colby was followed in 1914-15 by Ora Wendell Boothby, an enthusiastic Mason, who had passed through the chairs of the Council and was Eminent Commander of Bethany Commandery in 1912-13.

June 16, 1915, the Lodge had as guests the officers and members of Mount Olivet Lodge of Cambridge, Massachusetts, who exemplified parts of the third degree in the presence of 250 members, and presented the Lodge with a gavel as a souvenir of the occasion.

In 1916-17, Thomas W. Murphy was Master. January 16, 1916, a Military night was observed when Captain Daniel C. Smith of the 8th Infantry was given his third degree, with Captain Frederick G. Bauer of Elliot Lodge, Jamaica Plain, in the East and the other chairs filled by military officers in full uniform. Over 400 sat at the banquet which followed the work. April 4, 1917, R.W. Brother William H. Glover presented the Lodge with a beautiful, silk, American Flag, as a token of good will and affection. During Wor. Brother Murphy's term, the campaign for a new temple was undertaken.

In 1918-19, Perley R. Leek presided. Our Senior Warden, Herbert M. Abbott, and many of our members went to France. The dues of all such were remitted, and every encouragement given their patriotic endeavors.

In 1920, William E. Redfern served us as Master, and in common with most other Lodges, finds many candidates knocking at the door for admittance.

June 9, 1920, about one hundred of our members journeyed by auto to the Masonic Home at Charlton and worked the Third Degree upon five candidates, paying a fraternal visit to our Brother John Tempest, who has for several years been a resident of the Home.

On this seventy-fifth anniversary, we are able to continue as Worshipful Brother Scott said in his review of the activities of the Lodge at the fiftieth anniversary, "the brief and simple annals of the activities of this Lodge."

In 1922-23, Joseph C. Saalfrank presided. During his administration we had Budleigh Lodge of Beverly, Massachusetts, as our guest. On April 29th, 1922, occurred the laying of the corner stone of the Lawrence Masonic Temple, with Most Worshipful Arthur D. Prince, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, in attendance. All the Lodges in the district participated in a public parade previous to the ceremonies. The dedication of the new Temple occurred on April 16, 1923, with appropriate ceremonies by Most Worshipful Dudley H, Ferrell, Grand Master, and officers of the Grand Lodge. 1924-25, Arlon C. Adams. On April 16th, the Lodge unveiled and re-dedicated the Memorial Tablet in honor of the Brethren of Phoenician Lodge who were in the service in the late World War. On March 18th the officers and members of Boston Chapter, Order of DeMolay, were our guests. They exemplified their degrees and over 500 Master Masons were present.

1926, Percy B. Ellis served as Master of the Lodge for this period. On February 28th, Worshipful Master Clifton A. Stevens and officers of Mount Horeb Lodge of Woburn were our guests. On March 17th a committee was appointed to consider the advisability of the formation of a Chapter of the order of DeMolay to be sponsored by Phoenician Lodge. May 19th, we were honored by a fraternal visit from Most Worshipful Frank L. Simpson, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, accompanied by a distinguished suite.

1927-28, James Houston served as Master. The death of Arthur W. Dyer, first Secretary and last charter member of the Lodge occurred. June 11, 1927, fraternal visit was paid by R.W. Robert K. Disney, District Deputy Grand Master of the 11th Masonic District, who presented Veteran's Medals to Wor. William T. Kimball, Wor. John A. Brackett, Bro. Benjamin F. Dame and Bro. Daniel A. Smith. The 19th Lodge of Instruction was instituted October 1928, and at that time a fraternal visit was paid by R. W. Harry Wilkinson, District Deputy Grand Master of the 11th District. At this visitation he presented a Veteran's Medal to Wor. Octavius T. Howe, our oldest living Grand Master.

1929-30, Daniel Saunders, who presided as Master, and was the grandson of Caleb Saunders, the second Master of Phoenician Lodge. After thirty-one years of faithful service as Chaplain of this Lodge, we record the death of Brother Otto F. Kress.

1931. Henry W. Kruschwitz was publicly installed as Master on January 28, 1931 — the first public installation in a number of years. Veteran's Medal for fifty years of service was awarded to Brother William L. Stedman.

1932-33. Harry J. Bunting ably presided as Master during those critically disturbing years and did much, more than most of our members are aware of, to promote the welfare ol the Lodge. At a fraternal visit to the Lodge by R. W. James R. Baldwin, District Deputy Grand Master of the 11th District, a Veteran's Medal was presented to Wor. Brother Parry C. Wig-gin, who presided as Master of this Lodge in 1889-91, and the Joseph Warren Distinguished Service Medal was presented to Wor. Brother Harry J. Bunting. Wor. Brother Bunting has also served as District Deputy Grand Master of this District.

1934-35. Philip A. Carr presided during this period. Wor. Brother Carr seems well filled by nature to carry great burdens and assume responsibilities. He is prominent in all the Masonic bodies and has served in many offices. He also is a second generation Master, his father, Frederick A. Carr, having served as Master in 1894-95. Like father, like son. Brother William Henry Russell received a Veteran's Medal on May 16, 1934, in recognition of being a Mason in good standing for fifty years. A change occurred in the time for holding the annual meeting of the Lodge, it being held now in September instead of December, as formerly.

1936-37. Allan J. Battershill presided during this period. A Veteran's Medal was presented to Brother Mahlon E. Austin at the visitation of R.W. Harry J. Bunting, District Deputy Grand Master, on November 17, 1937.

1938-39. Harry B. Call, Jr., presided. September 21, 1938, was the night of the hurricane and the Secretary noted: "The wind was blowing 100 miles an hour; trees were falling, the lights were out, and it was a wild night!"

1940-41. Herbert P. Reifel presided. May 15, 1940, Veteran's Medals were presented to Brothers J. Edward Aldred, George A. Foster and Dana W. Scott, at a fraternal visitation by R.W. Malcolm B. McTiernan, District Deputy Grand Master of the 11th District.

1942-43. George W. Day served as Master. January 20, 1942, we were honored by a fraternal visit by Most Worshipful Albert A. Schaefer, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, accompanied by a distinguished suite, to do honor to R.W. William H. Glover. At that time he was presented with a Past District Deputy Grand Master's Apron, a Veteran's Medal and a Distinguished Service Medal. The death of Brother Wil-loughby W. Lathrop, who served as Secretary of the Lodge for thirty-two years, during which he had missed only one communication, occurred on July 17, 1943. Wor. Brother Day is now serving as Secretary of the Lodge.

1944-45. Paul H. Leslie serves as Master. March 15, 1944, Veteran's Certificates were awarded to Brothers Harry R. Dow, George H. Merrick, William McDavitt, James B. Robinson and Joseph W. Robinson. The Secretary reports for 1944 that this year has been an active one and that the financial statement is the highest we have enjoyed for many years. The good work continued during 1945.

Phoenician Lodge in this quarter century has participated with the other Lodges of this city in the building of the new Masonic Temple, considered one of the finest temples in the state. The corner stone was laid in 1922 and the dedication occurred in 1923.

We have joined with the other bodies in the institution of a Chapter of the Order of DeMolay for boys and of the Order of the Rainbow for girls.

We have had our share in the institution of the 19th Lodge of Instruction, and all matters proposed by the Grand Lodge have had our support, such as: Juniper Hall, the new Hospital at Shrewsbury, the Masonic Service Bureau, the Mississippi Valley Relief Fund; the Masonic Service Center at Fort Devens, etc.

Without doubt the last twenty-five years have been difficult years and have tested all fraternal organizations. Periods of stress have occurred one after another and we have had to readjust ourselves to the changing circumstances. We have had our seasons of hope and again those in which we were depressed, but withal, a steady determination to carry on the good principles of Masonry has brought us through and we enter the future with greater hopefulness, as has been so ably stated previously by Wor. Brother Scott: "In our community, there is great need for an organization such as ours where there is ever an open Bible upon the altar and where even the youngest Entered Apprentice finds himself gazing upon the folds of the American Flag, symbolic of our teachings."

We cannot yet evaluate, historically, what we all have passed through nor what affect the changes resulting from World War II may have on our institution, but it seems certain that a new philosophy is spreading over the world quite in harmony with the principles of Masonry. Be of good cheer, and with God's help face the new world with courage.

"Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul,
As the swift seasons roll!
Leave thy low-vaulted past!
Let each new temple, nobler than the last,
Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast,
Till thou at length are free,
Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting seas."

CENTENARY HISTORY, NOVEMBER 1970

From Proceedings, Page 1970-483:

From 1945 to 1970 By Worshipful Weston D. Eastman.

(A detailed history of Phoenician Lodge for the period from 1870 to 1920 by Wor. Dana W. Scott may be found in the Proceedings of Grand Lodge for 1920 — pages 351-362, inclusive; and for the period from 1920 to 1945 by Wor. James Houston in the Proceedings for 1945—pages 497-508, inclusive.)

We arc about to celebrate our 100th Anniversary. Much has passed since our last anniversary when, twenty-five years ago, we celebrated our 75th Anniversary. We saw the ending of World War II and with it the increase in membership brought about by the return of boys from our country's service. We have, since that time, had our ups and downs with the Korean War and Vietnam conflicts. This has affected membership considerably, but the Lodge has continued to stay on top through these troubled times. Our leadership for the past twenty-five years has kept up the high standards established by our predecessors during the first seventy-five years. There have been difficult years — true, but we have been successful in readjusting. On this great occasion, our 100th Anniversary, we give thanks to all who helped contribute to the building of this first century and with God's help we will face the next century with desire and enthusiasm.

1946-1947. A. Earl Arnfield presided in the East. Wor. George W. Day resigned as Secretary and Brother Philip F. Robbins was elected Secretary. Rt. Wor. Philip A. Carr of Phoenician Lodge visited his Lodge for the purposes of Fraternal and Official Visitations.

1948-1949. Adolph R. McLennan served as Master. A Past Masters' Night was held and nine Past Masters filled the Chairs for a third degree. Special degree teams were guests during the term to work third degrees on Gas Company and Y's Men's Club candidates.

1950-1951. Perley H. Lock presided as Worshipful Master. Rt. Wor. Frederick G. Caspar presented a 50-year Veteran's Medal to Bro. Hezekiah Poore, and Wor. William E. Redfern was presented a Past Master's Apron as a gift from his friends in Phoenician Lodge in recognition of his many years of service as an officer of Phoenician Lodge. A Past Masters Quarter Century Night was held.

1952-1953. Richard A. Hale served nobly as Master and the Lodge had many special events. A Degree Team from Aleppo Temple Shrine performed. It was a highly successful term with good attendance. A highlight was the presentation of a silver tray to Wor. Brother Hale's wife.

1954-1955. William H. Redfern as a second generation Phoenician Lodge Master performed well. Officers' aprons were purchased for the officers. Several 50-ycar Veterans' Medals were awarded. Phoenician Lodge was host for St. John's Day breakfast.

1956-1957. Robert Barnett served as Master and Wor. Perley Locke was appointed District Deputy Grand Master. Rt. Wor. William Glover passed away. Several supper meetings were held and there were degrees put on by visiting degree teams.

1958. Ralph A. Robbins presided as Master and many special events were held in addition to the regular work. A Florida degree was put on comprised of greater Lawrence Masons before a large crowd. This group was known as the D. K. Webster Memorial Degree Team.

1959.Weston D. Eastman, a third generation member, served as Master and at his installation the Grand Master for the State of New Hampshire, Most Worshipful Harold C. McAllister, was present. 50-year Medals were presented to Bro. David Farr and Bro. Wilbur Emmons. Several visiting degree teams performed during the year along with the regular officers.

1960-1961. Richard G. Locke presided as Master. Many candidates were received during the term and the Lodge continued to prosper. Several dinners were held and the sociability did much to bring about a close tie among its members.

1962-1963. Duncan S. MacKillop served as Master. He was the first Past Master Councilor of DeMolay to serve as Master of Phoenician Lodge. It was a successful term of office and activities for the year were at a high.

1964-1965. Stanley I. Kay presided as Master of the Lodge. We lost several 50-year members during his term, but we also raised several new members. Phoenician Lodge was host for St. John's Day and services were held at Grace Church.

1966. Alan R. McLennan became a second generation to serve as Master of Phoenician Lodge. His father, Wor. Adolph McLennan, continued as Secretary. Many activities were held and the Lodge continued to prosper.

1967. John H. Campbell presided as Master of the Lodge. Several third degrees were held and special degrees were put on by a Grace Church Degree Team.

1968. James L. DeMarco presided as Master and during his term Phoenician Lodge continued to be active and the Service Committee was very active.

1969. Harry J. Masucci presided as Master and served the Lodge well. A 25 Year Night was held to honor the 25-year Veterans.

1970. Alfred J. Reynolds presided as Master and laid the ground work for this, our 100th Anniversary celebration. Through his diligence an active Committee was formed to formulate the plans.

Without being repetitious, much has transpired beyond all expectations during the past twenty-five years. Masonically, we have seen the mortgage paid off at the Temple. Phoenician Lodge has been honored by Rt. Wor. Richard A. Hale being awarded the Joseph Warren Medal — to join Rt. Wor. Harry Bunting. Wor. Weston D. Eastman was elected to the 33rd Degree in the Scottish Rite and Wor. John Campbell was elected to also receive the degree. Wor. Adolph R. McLennan was nominated to receive the 33rd Degree. Historically, we saw World War II end and the Korean War and Vietnam Conflict, which had members of Phoenician Lodge serving their country with pride and distinction. Our country placed a man on the moon and during all this, Masonry and Phoenician Lodge continued to prosper. We have been most fortunate in having the leadership in the past twenty-five years in keeping with our predecessors. On this special occasion it is most fitting and proper that we salute all the members and friends of Phoenician Lodge who have helped us pass through a century of devotion and love for Masonry. We are proud of the "White Kid Glove Lodge" and know that it will continue to reign as "the lodge" for years to come with this calibre of members it has been famous for.

OTHER

  • 1922 participation in Lawrence temple cornerstone laying, 1922-105)

EVENTS

CONSTITUTION OF LODGE, FEBRUARY 1872

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXXI, No. 5, March 1872, Page 150:

PHOENICIAN LODGE. This is the historically suggestive and classical name of a new and promising Lodge, located in the city of Lawrence, which, having worked a year under Dispensation, was formally Constituted and had its Officers duly installed by the M. W. Grand Lodge of this Commonwealth, on Wednesday the 21st of February, ult. Both ceremonies were tastefully and impressively performed by Grand Master Sereno D. Nickerson, assisted by R. W. Bros.

It is worthy of note in this connection that with two exceptions, the offices of the Grand Lodge were filled by their official representatives, and that there were four Past Grand Masters present; the last fact being especially gratifying, as indicating the interest which the older members of the Grand Lodge feel in every new enterprise calculated to strengthen and promote the welfare of the Order in the jurisdiction.

The ceremonies were conducted in accordance with the Ritual, and therefore need not be particularly described here, further than to add that the interest in them was largely increased by the fine singing of an excellent choir, and the equally fine playing of an accomplished organist. We were particularly struck with the effective rendering of the following beautiful hymn, sung at the closing of the Constituting ceremonies:—

HYMN.

Whilst thy genius, oh Masonry, spreads all around.
The rays of the halo with which thou art crowned;
Shall be the star, in thy sky, which now rising appears,
Not partake of that light, that grows brighter with years?

Shall its portion of fire be left to expire,
And leave no bright trace for as to admire?
Oh, no, its mild beams shall be seen from afar;
And the child of distress, bless the new rising star.

, Like the beams of that Star, which of old marked the way,
And led where of peace the sweet Messenger lay,
May its light, still to Virtue and Masonry true,
Mark the path that with strength Wisdom bids us pursue.
As its beams, unconfined, illumine the mind
With pleasure that leaves no sad feeling behind;
The jewel of beauty glows bright, and its ray
Makes Grief's gloomy night fly from Joy's radiant day.

As the blush of the rose more enchanting appears,
When its sweet leaves are fill'd with the morn's pearly tears;
So from gratitude's tears shall our star rise more bright;
For Charity's smile shall give warmth to its light.
And Justice divine shall with Harmony join,
To assist its ascent by the unerring line,
Whilst Prudence and Temperance guarding their own,
Shall shed a new ray upon Masonry's crown.

At the conclusion of the ceremonies at the hall, the Grand Lodge and Brethren in attendance were escorted to the American House, where they sat down to a well served dinner. This having been satisfactorily disposed of, the half hour remaining before the leaving of the cars for Boston, was occupied by short speeches by the M. W. Grand Master and R. W. Bros. Lewis, Heard and Parkman — all the speakers expressing their personal gratification with the organization and material of the new Lodge, and their hopes for its continued prosperity. We give the names of the officers installed as follows:

  • John Hay, W. M.
  • Granville M. Stoddard, S. W.
  • Caleb Saunders, J. W.
  • Samuel M. Stedman, Treas.
  • Arthur W. Dyer, Sec.
  • Thos. Leland, S. D.
  • John Pendergast, J. D.
  • Andrew Sharpe, Jr. Chaplain.
  • Horatio G. Herrick, S. S.
  • Cyrus N. Chamberlain, J. S.
  • John W. Barlow, I. S.
  • Gideon W. Waterhouse, Tyler.

There are now three Lodges in the city, all in active operation, and a new and more spacious hall for their future occupancy is nearly ready for dedication.

PRESENTATION, OCTOBER 1907

From New England Craftsman, Vol. III, No. 3, December 1907, Page 110:

The annual official visitation of Right Worshipful George H. Perkins, District Deputy Grand Master of the Tenth Masonic District of Massachusetts to Phoenician Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Lawrence, on Wednesday evening, October 30th, was in many ways a crowning event in the history of that lodge and an occasion of unusual interest and rare pleasure to the 300 brothers who attended, making it a representative gathering of Masonry of Greater Laurence and the Tenth District.

The Lodge was honored by the presence of Most Worshipful Brother John Albert Blake, Grand Master and many other prominent members of the order from Lowell, Haverhill and the surrounding towns. The invited guests were received at the railroad station by a committee of the members of the Lodge of which Worshipful Brother Caleb Saunders was the chairman and an automobile ride was enjoyed which took the visitors through the Andovers, Lawrence and Methuen. A feature of the trip was a visit to the Wood Worsted Mill, the largest of its kind in the world, where the party was received by Brother Frank Sherman, who showed them every courtesy, taking them over the wonderful plant. At 5.30 o'clock a sumptuous dinner was sat down to. when the party was increased to about 50.

card00401_fr.jpg
Wood Worsted Mill, Lawrence

District Deputy Grand Master Perkins' suite included Worshipful Brother Nesbit G. Gleason, Andover; Worshipful Brother Edward A. Bower. Methuen; Worshipful Brother George W. Rextrew, North Andover; Worshipful Brother James W. Leitch, North Andover, and Worshipful Brother Fred S. Smith, North Andover.

WilliamHGlover.jpg
Wor. William H. Glover

A feature of the evening was the presentation of a handsomely engrossed set of resolutions to Brother Benjamin Schrieber by Worshipful Master William H. Glover of Phoenician Lodge in recognition of the gift of a beautiful banner, handsomely embroidered with the working tools and other symbols of the order, presented to the lodge by Brother Schrieber upon his return from his recent voyage to the Orient as Chief Master at Arms Of the Battleship Ohio. The banner is a perfect specimen of the work of Japanese needlewoman. The resolutions were in the form of a booklet handsomely engrossed in colors, bearing on the fly leaf a likeness of the Battleship Ohio, Both in conception and execution the resolutions were the handiwork of Brother Gordon C. Cannon of St. Matthew's Lodge. Andover.

In his address District Deputy Grand Master Perkins paid high tribute to Worshipful Master Glover, who he said had labored hard to gain the good will and to strengthen the bonds of friendship and brotherly love of the sister lodges toward Phoenician Lodge.

Prominent Masons present, beside those already mentioned, were Right Worshipful Brother George W. Tufts, 2nd District; Right Worshipful Brother W. H. L. Odell, 3d District; Right Worshipful Charles S. Proctor of the 11th District; Arthur D, Prince, Lowell. Junior Grand Steward of the Grand Lodge, and Benjamin B. Gilman of Haverhill, Grand Pursuivant Of the Grand Lodge.

The exercises of the evening proved most satisfactory to all who were present. No small part of the pleasure of th meeting was due to the presence of the District Deputy Grand Master, whose genial manner and cordial good will always make him a welcome visitor in every lodge of his district. The exercises of the evening were concluded with a banquet. Vocal selections were rendered by Weber Quartet and speeches by the District Deputy Grand Master.


GRAND LODGE OFFICERS


DISTRICTS

1870: District 6 (Newburyport)

1883: District 10 (Lawrence)

1911: District 11 (Lawrence)

1927: District 11 (Lawrence)


LINKS

Massachusetts Lodges