BethesdaV

From MasonicGenealogy
Jump to: navigation, search

BETHESDA LODGE (VALPARAISO)

Location: Valparaiso, Chile

Chartered By: George M. Randall

Charter Date: 12/14/1854 V-534

Precedence Date: 08/27/1853

Current Status: active


NOTES

In the committee report on Grand Master William Sewall Gardner's address, presented in September 1869, a description of this lodge's activities is described (Page VII-376). The lodge is "well ordered and prosperous" as of this date, with "nominally about one hundred members." By direction of the Grand Master, the lodge is excused from the capitation tax, since "the maintenance of Lodges in foreign countries . . . is necessarily attended with expenses which are not demanded of Lodges in the immediate vicinity."

REPORT ON AMERICAN LODGES IN VALPARAISO

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XIII, No. 11, September 1854, Page 321:

In the report of the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of California, submitted at the' annual communication of that body in May last, we find the following statement:—

Pacific Lodge, at Valparaiso, returned her Dispensation, with a statement that they have dissolved the Lodge, not being able to work to their satisfaction, or the satisfaction of others, and preferred to give up their Dispensation rather than do wrong. This, if so, would be commendable ; but the Grand Secretary has been informed by a Brother, who was in the Lodge at the time of its agreement to dissolve, that the reasons they set forth are not true; but on the contrary the Lodge has not dissolved, but received a Dispensation from Massachusetts, and under which they are now working, and that he remonstrated with the Lodge against such action, for which they had no good reason, and no reason at all, except their dues to the Grand Lodge would be less, and they could give the degrees for a less sum than thirty-five dollars, as required by our Constitution. If the above statement be correct, the Lodge has acted in bad faith towards this Grand Lodge, and deserves to be deprived of any authority under which to hold a Lodge, until such time as she makes full reparation to this Grand Lodge ; and we trust the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts will revoke their Dispensation. If the Lodge be dissolved, all her jewels, furniture, books, clothing, and property whatsoever, revert to this Grand Lodge, which she of right should claim. Much pains was taken to forward to this Lodge every thing requisite for her guidance, and duplicate copies of papers and books were sent, with all the instructions necessary, and all asked for. They have not sent up their books, (nor a transcript) and no report sufficiently explicit to ascertain what amount is due the Grand Lodge up to the day of her dissolution. Though if she persist in dissolving, all she may have, as above stated, belongs to this Grand Lodge.

On this statement the Grand Lodge adopted the following resolution :—

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge solicit the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts to instruct Pacific Lodge, at Valparaiso, to comply with onr Constitution, touching its dissolving its allegiance to this Grand Lodge.

It is to be regretted that this matter, in its present crude and indefinite form, should hare been brought so prominently into the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of California. It is possible, in view of the above statement, that there has been something, if not positively wrong, not altogether strictly regular, in the proceedings of some of our Brethren at Valparaiso, in their efforts to establish an American Lodge in that city. But it is also possible that the Brother, from whom the information given by the Grand Secretary is derived, may have been mistaken, or not precisely informed, as to the actual reasons and considerations which led to the dissolution of Pacific Lodge and the surrender of its Dispensation. The informant is quite positive in his statements, and there can be no doubt that he has represented the facts fairly and impartially, according to his understanding of them. But, as suggested, it is possible that he may have been mistaken; and the benefit of this doubt, we think, should have been given to the Brethren at Valparaiso.

The statement of our Brother the Grand Secretary, was designed for the information of his Grand Lodge; and it furnished a sufficient basis for the appointment of a committee of inquiry. But, we respectfully submit, that it was hardly sufficient to authorize any further or more decisive action on the part of his Grand Lodge. We think that body had not before it the necessary information to enable it to act with a full and clear appreciation of the true condition of the case. And we are more fully impressed with the opinion, that the facts disclosed, are not such as to authorize the G. Lodge of Massachusetts to comply with the request contained in the resolution subsequently adopted. The resolution is predicated on an ex parte and verbal statement, the whole character of which is liable to be changed or materially modified by the explanations of the parties implicated. These explanations should have been sought through a committee of inquiry, and presented to the Grand Lodge in a definite and reliable form. A proper basis of action would then have been established; a resolution to meet the precise character of the case could have been framed; and whatever might have been its import, it would have carried with it the authority which ascertained facts always give to opinions. Any proper request, predicated on such a basis, emanating from the Grand Lodge of California, or from any other of its sister Grand Lodges, we are certain will ever receive from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, the respectful consideration to which it is entitled. But with no other information than that afforded by the report of the Grand Secretary of California, it is difficult to conceive how the Grand Lodge of this Commonwealth, is to comply with the terms of the resolution.

And this embarrassment is greatly increased by the fact, that it has never, nor has its Grand Master, issued any Dispensation for the organization of a Lodge at Valparaiso, under the name of Pacific Lodge. If there be such a Lodge at Valparaiso, it is as wholly independent of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, as any subordinate Lodge in the State of California; and there would be the same impropriety in its assuming to instruct that Lodge in its duties, as there would be in its assuming to control the action of California Lodge, No. 1, at San Francisco. Our Brethren of the Grand Lodge of California will perceive from this, that their proceedings were premature, and that they have made a request of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts with which that body cannot comply, as the case now stands. They evidently had not the requisite information in possession to enable them to act intelligently, and to arrive at just conclusions. This has naturally led to embarrassment; and, it may be, caused them, though unintentionally, to do injustice to the motives of the parties implicated. It may appear in the end, that the true reasons for the dissolution of the Lodge in question, are those assigned by the Brethren surrendering the Dispensation. We are the more inclined to entertain this opinion, because we cannot think that the mere matter of difference in the fees, would be such a consideration, with the respectable Brethren constituting the Lodge, as to induce them to do an act which, by any possibility, could be construed as dishonorable to themselves as Masons, or disrespectful to their Grand Lodge. And this opinion is strengthened by the fact, that the American Lodge, now in operation there, has fixed the fee for the three degrees conferred, at about fifty-two dollars. It would seem there¬ fore to have been wholly immaterial, so far as Pacific Lodge was interested in the matter, whether the minimum fee of its parent Grand Lodge, was twenty or thirty-five dollars. This reason then, we think, falls to the ground. (Fifty dollars is probably as low as the degrees can there be given.) The only other reason assigned, is of hardly more force.

It is proper to state, that there is a Lodge at Valparaiso, working under a Dispensation from Massachusetts. It was granted on a petition bearing date May 1st, 1853, to nine Brethren residing in that city. One of the petitioners hails from California. The other eight are from the Atlantic States. The Dispensation bears date August 27th, 1853, and authorizes the petitioners to organize under the name of Bethesda Lodge. They did so organize and made their report to the proper authority. At the date of the petition, it was understood that there was no American Lodge in the place; and this was doubtless true; though we have reason to believe that a petition had previously been forwarded, by other parties, for the Dispensation from California, under which Pacific Lodge was subsequently organized. But however this may be, Bethesda Lodge was immediately organized on the receipt of its Dispensation, and has continued in an active and highly prosperous condition to the present time. If it has ever had any other connection with Pacific Lodge, than that of fraternal intercourse, or if there has been anything like a fusion of the two bodies, the fact has not come to the knowledge of the Masonic authorities of Massachusetts. Indeed, no such fusion could lawfully take place. The Grand Lodge of this Commonwealth does not recognize the right of a Lodge, working under Dispensation, to admit members, or to change its appointed officers. It holds the petitioners alone responsible for the acts done under the authority of the Dispensation. When the Charter has been granted, and the Lodge constituted and registered, as such, in Grand Lodge, the petitioners are authorized to admit members, elect and instal their officers, and do all such other matters and things as pertain to complete and perfect Lodges; not before. The members of Pacific Lodge could not therefore affiliate with Bethesda Lodge, or hold any other relation to it than that of visiting Brethren. This would hardly seem to be a sufficient motive to induce them to dissolve their own existing organization, if they were in a condition to sustain it, and " to work to their own satisfaction, or the satisfaction of others." This they say they were not able to do ; and being unwilling to " do wrong," voted to "give up their Dispensation."

It is probably true that a discussion took place in Pacific Lodge on the evening of its dissolution, in which the Massachusetts Dispensation was referred to. It would be singular if the fact were otherwise. But it can hardly be true, as stated on the authority of the Brother " who was in the Lodge at the time," that the reason for the dissolution was, that the Brethren composing the Lodge, had "received a Dispensation from Massachusetts"; unless, indeed, it be assumed that the petitioners for Pacific Lodge were identical with the petitioners for Bethesda Lodge. Of this we have no evidence ; and in the absence of such evidence it is difficult to conceive of any satisfactory motive for such a proceeding. We have the fact, that when the petition for Bethesda Lodge was sent forward, Pacific Lodge had not been organized, nor was there an American Lodge at Valparaiso. We are also credibly assured, that a petition had previously been forwarded to California for the establishment of Pacific Lodge. But that the petitioners in both cases were the same Brethren, nowhere appears. On the contrary, we have before us the names of seven of the most prominent and active Brethren of Pacific Lodge, neither of whom signed the petition for Bethesda Lodge. This could hardly be so, if the petitioners for both were identical. We think therefore, (in the absence of all positive information on this point,) the most probable theory is, that the petitioners were distinct classes of Brethren ; and that, acting without consultation, and independently of each other, they bad incautiously been led to apply to different sources for authority to establish two Lodges where but one was required. This error, as might have been expected, probably soon manifested itself; and the Master of Pacific Lodge, on whom, we are informed, the ritual-duties of the Lodge mainly devolved, having left for California, the Brethren found themselves unable to do the work of the Lodge to their own satisfaction, or that of their visiting Brethren. Under these circumstances, and being unwilling, as they say, "to do wrong,"—that is, to do the work in an ineffective and improper manner,—they at once resolved to surrender their Dispensation and unite with Bethesda Lodge. This we think the most probable theory, if not the exact state of the case.

Such are the facts as they have come to our knowledge. We give them for the information of our Brethren of the Grand Lodge of California, and in the hope that they may aid them in their future inquiries. We can entertain no doubt that the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts will be most happy to comply with the request of her sister, whenever it shall become manifest that it is her duty, and that she can do so with a proper regard for the just rights of those who have a parental claim upon her. She will countenance no deception or irregularity in any Lodge or Brethren under her authority.

REPORT ON PACIFIC LODGE AT VALPARAISO

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XV, No. 10, August 1856, Page 305:

Those of our readers who were subscribers to this Magazine in 1854, will doubtless recollect the passage of a resolution by the Grand Lodge of California in that year, reflecting somewhat severely upon the conduct of certain American Brethren at Valparaiso, Chili, who had there organized themselves into a Lodge, first under a Dispensation from the Grand Lodge of California, and subsequently under authority from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. The details would not now be of any particular interest, and we omit them, by referring the reader to the volume for 1854, should he desire to learn them ; our present purpose in referring to the matter being merely to place the following resolutions on record in our pages, as the conclusion of the case, and a part of its history. They were adopted by the Grand Lodge of California at its annual session May last .—

"Upon a careful review of all the facts of the case, your committee have come to the conclusion that the action of this Grand Lodge, at its Annual Communication in May 1854 upon this subject, was taken without full information and explanation from Pacific Lodge; and that that Lodge was not justly deserving the censure then passed upon it. The committee therefore submit the subjoined resolutions as expressive of the sense of this Grand Lodge on the subject :—

  • "Resolved, That on further and careful examination of all the acts of Pacific Lodge, lately under dispensation from this Grand Lodge, it is the opinion of this Grand Lodge that the action had at the Annual Communication of 1854, relative to that Lodge, was based upon a want of knowledge of the entire facts of the case; and that said Lodge should be and is exonerated from any intentional discourtesy or want of respect to this Grand Lodge, from whom its first dispensation emanated.
  • "Resolved, That this Grand Lodge will not require said Lodge to forward its jewels, furniture, etc., and hereby releases it from all claims.
  • "Resolved, that a copy of the foregoing resolutions be forthwith transmitted to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and to the Secretary of the late Pacific Lodge, U. D."

HISTORICAL ACCOUNT FROM CALIFORNIA

Reported in the Trestleboard of Amity Lodge #442, California jurisdiction, September 2011:

In 1853, Grand Lodge of California had its first experience in authorizing the establishment of a Lodge in a foreign country that did not subsequently become United States territory. The result of this experience can best be told in the words of the late Grand Secretary John Whicher who gathered the facts on it from the Grand Lodge Proceedings of the day:

On May 5, 1853, a dispensation was issued for the formation of Pacific Lodge at Valparaiso, Chile. The history of this dispensation is interesting. At the annual communication in May, 1854, the Grand Secretary reported that Pacific Lodge, at Valparaiso, has returned its dispensation, with a statement that they have dissolved the Lodge, not being able to work to their satisfaction or the satisfaction of others, and preferring to give up their dispensation rather than do wrong. This, if so, would be commendable; but the Grand Secretary has been informed by a brother who was in the Lodge at the time of its agreement to dissolve, that the reason they set forth are not true; that the Lodge has not dissolved, but has received a dispensation from Massachusetts, under which they are now working; and that he remonstrated with the Lodge against such action, for which they had no good reason, indeed no reason at all except that their dues to the Grand Lodge would be less, and they could give the degrees for a less sum than thirty-fi ve dollars, as required by our Constitution. If the above statement be correct, the Lodge has acted in bad faith towards this Grand Lodge and deserves to be deprived of any authority under which to hold a Lodge until such time as it makes full reparation to this Grand Lodge, and we trust the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts will revoke its dispensation.

Thereupon the Grand Lodge of California adopted the following resolution:

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge solicit the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts to instruct Pacific Lodge at Valparaiso to comply with our Constitution touching the dissolution to its allegiance to this Grand Lodge.

The situation seems to have been explained by Massachusetts, for we find in the Proceedings of that jurisdiction for Wednesday evening, December 13, 1853, the following:

A transcript of the proceedings of Bethesda Lodge, working under dispensation at Valparaiso, South America, together with a copy of its bylaws and a petition for a charter, were received and referred to a committee, which reported that "the committee on the application of Edward W. Sartori and others for a Lodge to be called Bethesda Lodge in Valparaiso, Chile, have attended to the duty assigned them, and ask leave to report:

That in consequence of the somewhat peculiar circumstances of this case, it becomes necessary to make a short statement thereof, that the Grand Lodge may fully understand it in all its bearings.

In July or August of 1852, a number of brethren at Valparaiso, some of whom received the degrees in this vicinity and are well known here, transmitted a petition to the Grand Lodge of California, praying for a dispensation to constitute a Lodge under the name of Pacific Lodge.

They waited until May, 1853, when receiving no answer to their petition, they lost all hope of any, and accordingly petitioned this Grand Lodge for a charter under the name of Bethesda Lodge. The petition was duly received, and the Grand Master, fi nding that some of the applicants were well known to be men of standing and character, issued a dispensation, dated August 27, 1853, to Edward W. Sartori and others for a Lodge as prayed for. In June of that year the steamer Quito was wrecked on her passage from St. Francisco to Valparaiso, and in July the brethren there received their dispensation, found floating near the beach where the Quito was wrecked, giving them authority from the Grand Lodge of California to constitute Pacific Lodge, which was accordingly done on the 26th of July, a few days after receiving the dispensation.

They worked under that authority till December of that year, when on making up their accounts, they found it impossible to proceed any longer under that authority, as they were getting deeper and deeper in debt every day. They then decided to give up their dispensation from California, and wrote to the Grand Master of that Grand Lodge, informing him thereof, returning the dispensation and sending sufficient money to pay all dues.

The dispensation from this Grand Lodge for Bethesda Lodge was received December 14, 1853, when the brethren held a meeting and voted unanimously to accept the same. . . . The unfortunate complication of affairs arising from their double application to the Grand Lodge of California and to us, is the only feature of the case requiring explanation, and its aspects appear to your committee as follows:

They made application to the Grand Lodge of California for a Lodge under the name of Pacific Lodge; waiting some months in vain for an answer they then made application to us for a Lodge under the name of Bethesda Lodge. The dispensation from California having been accidentally delayed, arrived before ours, and they organized under it, but found they could not sustain their Lodge, and returned it, paying all dues, and then reorganized with a different name under ours. The only question is, had they a right under the circumstances to dissolve their Lodge, and then to reorganize under a different authority, and with another name? Your committee, after consulting competent Masonic authority, have concluded that they had that right; since there being no Grand Lodge in Chile, they necessarily worked under a foreign authority, and we see no reason to doubt that it was competent for them, finding it impossible to succeed under the regulations of one foreign authority, viz.: the Grand Lodge of California, and having decided to relinquish their organization under the same, then to accept and work under a dispensation from another foreign authority, viz., the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, first paying all dues and regularly returning then dispensation to the Grand Lodge of California. Under these circumstances, your committee recommend that a charter be issued as prayed for.

The recommendation was adopted.

At the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of California, May 6, 1856, Alex. G. Abell, who had succeeded Levi Stowell as Grand Secretary, reported that:Upon entering on the duties of this office, the present incumbent found several communications from Bro. C. T. Ward, Jr., the former Secretary of the late Pacific Lodge U. D. at Valparaiso, Chile, in which he complained of the harsh proceedings of this body, at its session of 1854, in reference to that Lodge. Believing from the representations made in those letters, that injustice might possibly have been done under a wrong impression relative to the conduct of Pacifi c Lodge, the undersigned wrote to Brother Ward that if he would send a full statement of those matters wherein he thought the brethren at Valparaiso had been aggrieved, it would afford him much pleasure to lay the subject before the Grand Lodge, and to lend his assistance for the redress of any injury which might have been committed. Several papers were transmitted in reply to this communication, and they are now all presented for the consideration of the Grand Lodge.

At the same communication the Committee on Grievances, to whom the correspondence had been referred, made a full report, which was adopted, as follows:

We find that at the session of the Grand Lodge in 1853, a dispensation was granted to certain brethren at Valparaiso, Chile, to open a Lodge to be called Pacific Lodge. No further mention of this Lodge appears upon the proceedings of the Grand Lodge, until the session of 1854, when we find a report from the then Grand Secretary, our lamented brother, Levi Stowell, commenting in rather severe and harsh terms upon the action of said Lodge, in having returned her dispensation, dissolved the Lodge, and taken a new dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, alleging, also, that said Lodge had acted in bad faith towards this Grand Lodge, and hoping that the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts would revoke their dispensation; and requiring that the jewels, furniture, etc., etc., of that Lodge should be forwarded to this Grand Lodge.

On the presentation of this report, the Grand Lodge adopted a resolution soliciting the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for a similar instrument. The dispensation from this Grand Lodge, however, reached them first, and a Lodge was instituted under it; subsequently difficulties having arisen in the Lodge, and another dispensation having reached the applicants from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, more liberal in its terms and giving greater facilities to the members of the Lodge, the brethren, several of whom hailed previously from that jurisdiction, and who were familiar with its work and ritual, decided to relinquish the dispensation held by them from this Grand Lodge; which they accordingly did, and a portion of the members of the old Lodge coalesced with other Masons and established a new Lodge under the dispensation from Massachusetts. This course we do not think was improper or in violation of Masonic usage or duty, as we have every reason to believe that Pacific Lodge, while under dispensation from this Grand Lodge, paid all the dues and charges owing to this Grand Lodge, and probably more than was actually due. The entire correspondence of the late Secretary of that Lodge, Bro. C. T. Ward, Jr., is fraternal and courteous, and in behalf of the Lodge exhibits towards this Grand Lodge the proper Masonic spirit. It seems to assign principally as the cause of the dissolution of the connection between that Lodge and this Grand Body, the difficulty of obtaining information from it, the want of knowledge of its work and ritual, and the superior privileges afforded to them by the dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.

These reasons your committee consider to be cogent and deserving of consideration, and to be a justification of the course taken by said Lodge. Your committee are further of the opinion that it is unnecessary to require the late Pacific Lodge to forward to this Grand Lodge its furniture, jewels, etc., as it appears that what remains of them is entirely useless and of no value, and has been for the most part preserved as relics by the new Lodge.

Upon a careful review of all the facts of the case, your committee have come to the conclusion that the action of this Grand Lodge, at its annual communication in May, 1854, upon this subject was taken without full information and explanation from Pacific Lodge; and that that Lodge was not justly deserving the censure then passed upon it. The committee therefore submit the subjoined resolutions as expressive of the sense of this Grand Lodge on the subject.

Resolved, That on further and careful examination of all the acts of Pacific Lodge, lately under dispensation from this Grand Lodge, it is the opinion of this Grand Lodge that the action had at the annual communication of 1854, relative to that Lodge, was based upon a want of knowledge of the entire facts of the case; and that said Lodge should be and is exonerated from any intentional discourtesy of want of respect to the Grand Lodge, from whom its first dispensation emanated.

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge will not require said Lodge to forward its jewels, furniture, etc., and hereby releases it from all claims.

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolutions be forthwith transmitted to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and to the Secretary of the late Pacific Lodge U. D.

At the quarterly communication of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for September, 1856, the above resolutions were received and entered of record. Thus ended the mix-up, in perfect harmony.


PAST MASTERS

  • Edward W. Sartori, 1853
  • Charles T. Ward, 1854
  • George Henry Kendall, 1855, 1856; SN
  • James Heyward, 1857
  • Robert A. Claude, 1858, 1859
  • James W. Howe, 1860
  • James L. Bennet, 1861
  • Hugh Plunkett Bourchier, 1862, 1863, 1871; Mem
  • Robert Dalzell, 1864, 1870
  • H. M. Caldwell, 1865
  • George E. Jones, 1866, 1869
  • David Trumbull, 1867; Mem
  • Frederick Stovin Golborne, 1868
  • James Crichton, 1872, 1873
  • Charles L. Cole, 1874
  • Robert M. Campbell, 1875, 1876
  • R. S. Gowdie, 1877
  • George Meldrum, 1878, 1884
  • Charles Milne, 1879, 1880
  • Alexander Livingstone, 1881
  • William Walker, 1882
  • David Urquhart, 1883
  • Robert Ludford, 1885, 1886
  • William Hall, 1887-1890
  • Charles J. Warner, 1891, 1892
  • Edward Thomas, 1893
  • Samuel McComb, 1894, 1895
  • David M. Ness, 1896, 1897, 1899
  • William G. Roberts, 1898
  • Henry Humphreys, 1900
  • William Wotherspoon, 1902, 1903
  • James Walls, 1904, 1906, 1908, 1910, 1916
  • James Harper, 1905
  • Frederick J. Harper, 1907, 1911
  • Ernest H. Trapnell, 1909
  • Ernest E. Wells, 1912
  • Charles P. Laverick, 1913
  • James L. Robertson, 1914
  • William Buchanan Reid, 1915
  • William O. Fyfe, 1917
  • Percy E. Woolvett, 1918
  • Joseph W. Wood, 1919, 1920, 1946
  • Hugh K.W. McCulloch, 1921, 1923
  • Walter J. Fogg, 1922
  • William H. Wilson, 1924, 1947
  • Joseph S. McDonald, 1925; Mem
  • William G. Gardner, 1926-1928, 1948
  • Arthur J. Turner, 1929, 1930
  • Kenward L. Fleet, 1932, 1933
  • Albert Turner, 1934-1936
  • Frederick W. Battershill, 1937, 1938
  • John F. Errington, 1939, 1940
  • Norman Hall, 1941, 1942
  • Roland B. Raby, 1943, 1944
  • James H. Edmondson, 1945
  • Oscar P. Nelson, 1949-1951, 1953, 1956-1958, 1964
  • Allan A. Phillips, 1952, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1985-1988
  • Joseph McCallum, 1954, 1955
  • Jens Sorensen, 1959-1962, 1978
  • Norman A. Stuart, 1963
  • Carlos Bravo, 1965-1968, 1979-1982
  • John H. Murdoch, 1969, 1970, 1983
  • Ronald Charles, 1971, 1972
  • Edwin J. Mallet, 1975
  • Jens Sorensen, 1978 - 1979
  • John Richard Enos, 1989, 1990, 1993-1996, 1999, 2002, 2003
  • Daniel W. Jayme, 1991, 1992
  • Enrique S. Cañas, 1997, 1998
  • J. Francisco Casas, 2000, 2001
  • Armando J. Cruzat, 2004, 2005
  • A. Thomas Jackson, 2006, 2007
  • Claudio Stuardo, 2008-2010
  • Andrew J. Cave, 2011, 2012

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Dispensation: 1853
  • Petition for Charter: 1854

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1923 (70th Anniversary)
  • 1953 (Centenary)
  • 2009 (150th Anniversary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1895 1910 1921 1922 1929 1939 1941 1945 1949 1951 1952 1954 1958 1960

HISTORY

  • 1923 (70th Anniversary history of the Lodge, 1923-460)
  • 1953 (Centenary history, 1953-273; see below)

70TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, SEPTEMBER 1923

From Proceedings, Page 1923-460:

By Bro. Albert Turner.

On December 14, 1853, a preliminary meeting of Bethesda Lodge was held, the following Brethren being present: E. W. Sartori, J. S. Priest, C. T. Ward, Jr., W. Davis, G. H. Kendall, R. J. Lyon, J. Mellet, J. R. Robertson, J. Rattray, G. Foot, and P. Oswald.

Bro. E. W. Sartori took the chair when a Dispensation from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts dated August 27, 1853, was read, authorizing the opening of a Masonic Lodge in Valparaiso under the Ancient York Rites in the title and designation of Bethesda Lodge.

Bethesda Lodge is the oldest English-speaking Lodge on the west coast of South America, but it was not the first 1o be formed, as on July 29, 1853, the first meeting of Pacific Lodge No. 1, was held in Valparaiso under Dispensation from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of California. It would appear from the records that our worthy founding-members applied to the Grand Lodge of California for a Charter and due to prolonged delay in getting a reply they also applied to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. In the meantime, however, the Dispensation from California came along and forthwith Pacific Lodge No. 1, was opened on July 29, 1853, and worked until December 27, 1853, when this Lodge was closed to take up the Dispensation received from Boston, Mass.

During the short life of Pacific Lodge No. 1, thirty-six applications were received and degrees conferred as follows:

  • Initiations fifteen,
  • Passings twelve,
  • Raisings nine, and
  • Affiliations one.

From the records of Pacific Lodge No. 1, we gather that the French Lodge, Etoile du Pacific, was in existence at that time, and that the Chilean Lodge, Union Fraternal, holding Charter from the Grand Orient of France was founded about the same time.

The closing of Pacific Lodge is duly certified in the Record Book, the reason stated as being due to the principal members having accepted a warrant from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. The Charter members were Bros. E. W. Sartori, J. Ward, Jr., J. Heyward, W. Bogardson, G. H. Kendall, J. R. Robertson, J. H. Pearson, and H. B. Potter. The Charter was received and accepted at the regular meeting of March 14, 1855.

Bro. Edward W. Sartori was elected as the first Worshipful Master of Bethesda Lodge on December 14, 1853, and at that meeting it was decided that this Lodge should continue the work of what was Pacific Lodge No. 1, and confer the degrees of F. C. and M. M. upon those Brethren who had been Initiated in said Lodge. On January 18, 1854, several names were added to those on the Charter making a total of twenty-four Brethren constituting Bethesda Lodge.

The first work undertaken by Bethesda Lodge was to confer the sublime degree of Master Mason upon Bro. Alfred Andrews on January 27, 1854, who had previously received his first and second degrees in Pacific Lodge No. 1. This Brother died on October 17, 1874, and his Master Mason diploma (which was the first to be issued by Bethesda Lodge) must have been returned by his family, for it was subsequently found in the archives of the Lodge and hangs on the wall of the ante-room.

During the course of seventy years, one thousand one hundred and three applications for degrees and affiliation have been received and acted upon, while degrees conferred have been :

  • Initiations, 644
  • Passings, 598
  • Raisings, 595 and
  • Affiliations, 160

The roll at present is composed of:

  • Honorary Members, 6
  • M.M., 114
  • F. C., 2
  • E. A., 4
  • Total, 126

I n the year 1854 the custom of celebrating St. John's day, June 24, was instituted, the Lodge was opened at twelve noon on the first, second, and third degrees, appropriate remarks made by the Worshipful Master and others, and the Lodge then closed in the same manner. This custom, however, died out about 1875.

In the year 1855 the first District Deputy Grand Master was appointed by the Grand Lodge, this high office falling to the distinguished Brother Charles T. Ward, Jr. This appointment was resented by the Worshipful Master of the Lodge, E. W. Sartori, who refused to accept the authority or recognize such an appointment, which attitude nearly caused Bethesda to die in its infancy.

The Lodge formed into two parties and that headed by Bro. Charles T. Ward on August 4, 1855, presented a petition to Bethesda Lodge asking them to recommend the granting of a Charter for a new Lodge to be named the Southern Cross No. 2. Happily this was withdrawn four days later, although as yet peace and harmony had not been restored. Some trouble was experienced in the electing of officers for the Masonic year 1855-56, but after repeated attempts the. election of officers finally took place on November 17, E. W. Sartori and eight other members having dimitted on November 15. From that memorable time dates the prosperity of Bethesda Lodge, which has gone steadily forward to the present day, and we the present members of the Lodge look back over a period of seventy years and are proud of the work done and examples laid down by the many worthy Brothers who have worked in our Lodge for the good of the Order and of Humanity.

The District Deputy Grand Masters recorded are:

  • Charles T. Ward, Jr., 1855-60
  • Geo. H. Kendall, 1860-73
  • H. P. Bouchier, 1873-76
  • Rev. David Trumbull, 1876-89
  • Peter Ewing, 1890-95
  • George Waters, 1895-1900
  • Rev. Frank Thompson, 1901-04
  • David Urquhart, 1905-15; District Grand Master 1915-19
  • James Walls, District Grand Master 1920 to present.

In June, 1857, a petition was presented to the Lodge asking that they recommend the opening of Ward Lodge, Tongoy, but same was not supported, being considered premature. In September, 1857, a similar petition was received for the opening of Hiram Lodge, Copiapo, which was put forward and duly authorized by our Most Worshipful Grand Lodge on December 15, 1857, and the Charter granted December 14, 1859. This Lodge closed a few years later.

In August, 1858, Bethesda Lodge was asked to recommend a Charter from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, for a new Lodge in Valparaiso, to be called Republican Lodge. The name was subsequently altered to Southern Cross, and a Dispensation was granted as requested. The first meeting was held on December 28, 1858, and the Lodge worked until February, 1860, when it was finally closed down.

According to our records a revolution broke out in Chile in February, 1859, and on this account the Lodge was in recess until June 6 of the same year. In August, 1859, the then District Deputy Grand Master formed a District Grand Lodge the object being to give counsel to the subordinate Lodges and maintain the integrity of the Ancient York Rite. Bethesda Lodge doubted the legality of such a Lodge and refused to acknowledge it, and as no further mention is made regarding same, it is presumed it died a natural death.

In January, 1861, the Lodge Aurora de Chile was formed in Concepcion, holding Charter from the Grand Orient of France.

On June 9, 1862, Bethesda Lodge received a letter from a body styling itself as the GRAND LODGE of CHILE, but it was not until December 30, 1862, that the same was recognized by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. On February 16, 1863, a letter from our Grand Lodge was read giving us authority to recognize said Grand Lodge and its subordinate Lodges, which at that time were Union Fraternal and Progreso.

It may be interesting to know that in July, 1867, a motion was presented to Bethesda Lodge for the appointment of a Committee to wait upon the Grand Lodge of Chile to arrange conditions by which Bethesda Lodge might be placed under its jurisdiction, but this was not carried out.

On January 11, 1869, a petition was signed by fourteen Master Masons and put before the Lodge, asking Bethesda to recommend the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts to grant a Charter to a new Lodge to be called Aconcagua to meet in Valparaiso. This was put forward and Aconcagua Lodge was started in February, 1870, and worked until September, 1897, when it finally closed down.

On November 14, 1870, Bethesda Lodge was requested by several Masons to recommend them to the Grand Lodge of Scotland for a warrant to establish a Scotch Lodge in Valparaiso, which they did, Lodge Star and Thistle No. 509, being afterwards inaugurated. Star and Thistle worked until September, 1879, when it went into recess to reopen again in September, 1894, to continue, working successfully until the present time.

On September 12, 1895, several Brethren in Santiago petitioned Bethesda Lodge for a recommendation for a Charter from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for a new Lodge to be formed in Santiago, to be called Huelen Lodge, which received due attention, a Charter being granted and the first meeting being held on July 15, 1876.

In September, 1889, the Past Masters of various Foreign Lodges meeting in Valparaiso were called together for the purpose of forming an Independent Grand Lodge, but nothing came of it.

There is a curious incident noted in the records of where a person was not initiated owing to the fact that he would not remove his ring.

In January, 1910, a woman was admitted to a Chilean Lodge in Santiago which was the cause of relations being suspended with the Lodges holding under the Grand Lodge of Chile. This affair was happily settled satisfactorily, and in August of the same year we were authorized by Grand Lodge to renew Masonic relations which today are more cordial than ever.

ChileVisit1913.jpg

February, 1913, was the occasion of the visit of the then Grand Master, Most Worshipful Everett C. Benton, to Chile, particularly to Valparaiso, he being the first Grand Master of our Most Worshipful Grand Lodge to visit his Lodges in foreign parts, and although Bethesda was in its sixtieth year the members were proud of the honor conferred by the Grand Master, as also we are proud to have a Most Worshipful Past Grand Master as an honorary member of our Lodge.

The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts is the only Grand Lodge in the United States of America, having Lodges outside its borders. (Brother Turner is in error here. California, Washington, and New York have Lodges outside the states in which they are located. — F. W. H.)

Our Lodge has been in active session throughout the whole of its existence of seventy years, and the Brethren were in times past as well as at present a very energetic and enthusiastic band, note, for instance the following; the tenth of the month, regular Communication; thirteenth, anniversary; fifteenth, Special Communication; seventeenth, Special Communication; twentieth, Special Communication, which no doubt eclipses any work of recent years.

It is interesting to note that the honor conferred on the Lodge, by the appointment of Right Worshipful Brother David Urquhart as District Grand Master, was made possible by the hearty cooperation of the Right Worshipful Brother Chevallier Boutell, and the twenty-one Brethren of his suite, who travelled 2,800 miles, consuming eleven days and at no small personal expense, to install the officers and inaugurate the District Grand Lodge, which will no doubt go down in history as a parallel case to that of a deputation sent from London in 1733 to inaugurate our Grand Lodge, the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, the oldest Masonic Body in the United States of America, as we are the oldest English-speaking Lodge in Valparaiso, and on this coast also. (The deputation referred to here and in many historical notes was a paper, no a party. The word seems to have misled Brother Turner. — F. W. H.) This generous action of Right Worshipful Brother Boutell was highly appreciated by our Grand Lodge, when on the occasion of the visit of Right Worshipful Brother Boutell to our Grand Lodge, the Grand Master took from his own breast the greatest distinction the Grand Lodge confers, and presented it to Brother Boutell, which he prizes very much. I refer to the Henry Price Medal.

In reviewing the records of the Lodge we cannot pass without mention of our old members. We have still among us Brother W. Purcell, our senior member, with a record of fifty-five years a Mason, Brother White thirty-six years, Brother W. G. L. Baton who affiliated thirty-four years ago, Right Worshipful Brother James Walls, Brother W. Gray, and Brother J. S. MacDonald who can record thirty years service.

There is a Chinese proverb which says "As the scream of the eagle is heard when she has passed over, so a man's name remains after his death." We cannot let this auspicious occasion pass without feeling's of admiration, gratitude, and honor to the Brethren, who have laid down their working-tools and gone to the Celestial Lodge above, from the District Grand Master to the humblest Brother who have so faithfully and zealously worked for the welfare of the Lodge and its prosperity in this city.

It is very gratifying to observe the very cordial relations which have always existed with the various Lodges of this city, visits being recorded at almost all our Special Communication and 1 noted with much pleasure the record of an official visit of the King Cyrus Royal Arch Chapter, which is repeated again this evening. Lethesda has ever been ready to assist a fallen Brother, his widow or orphans. There is a continuous record in the minutes of the Lodge of charities and assistance given to needy cases, notably monthly allowances, especially to sick Brethren and widows.

Bethesda always had and no doubt always will have a smile and cordial welcome for the Brethren of Valparaiso and the Brethren who come in and out of the port, which is well summed up in the following:

H E L L O.

When you meet a friend in woe
Walk right up and say, Hello;
Say, Hello, and How do you do —
How's the world a-using you
Is he clothed in rags? Oh, sho;
Rags are but a common roll
For to cover up a soul,
And a soul that's good and true
Is worthy of a hearty how-do-you-do.

When big ships meet at sea
They salute and sail away
Just like you and just like me,
Lonesome ships upon the sea,
Each one sailing its own jig
To the port beyond the fog,
Let your speaking trumpet blow,
Lift your horn and cry, Hello.

Say Hello, and How-do-you-do.
Plenty of folks as good as you,
When they leave this home of clay
For this distant far away,
When we travel through strange country
The other side the range
Then the folks we helped will know
Who we be and say, Hello.

CENTENARY HISTORY, SEPTEMBER 1953

From Proceedings, Page 1953-273:

By Worshipful William G. Gardner and Worshipful Frederick J. Harper.

On December 14, 1853, a preliminary meeting of Bethesda Lodge was held, the following Brethren being present: E. W. Sartori, J. S. Priest, C. T. Ward, Jr., W. Davis, G. H. Kendall, J. R. Lyon, J. Mollet, J. Rattray, J. R. Robertson, G. Foot and P. Oswald.

Brother E. W. Sartori took the Chair when a Dispensation from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, dated August 27, 1853, was read, authorizing the opening of a Masonic Lodge in Valparaiso, under the Ancient York Rite in the Title and Designation of Bethesda Lodge.

Bethesda Lodge is the oldest English-speaking Lodge on the West Coast of South America, but it was not the first to be formed, as on the 29th of July, 1853, the first meeting of "Pacific Lodge No. 1," was held in Valparaiso under dispensation from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of California. Our worthy founding members had applied to the Grand Lodge of California for a Charter, but due to prolonged delay in getting a reply, they also applied to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. In the meantime, however, the dispensation from California came along and forthwith the Pacific Lodge No. 1 was opened on the 29th of July, 1853, and worked until December 27, 1853, when it was closed to take up the dispensation received from Boston, Massachusetts. During the short life of Pacific Lodge No. 1, thirty-six applications were received and degrees conferred as follows: Initiations, 15; Passings, 12; Raisings, 9; Affiliation, 1.

The records of Pacific Lodge No. 1 show that the French Lodge Etoile du Pacifique and the Chilean Lodge Union Fra- ternal, holding Charters from the Grand Orient of France, were in existence at that time. The closing of Pacific Lodge No. 1 is duly certified in the record book, the reason stated as being due to the principal members' having accepted a warrant from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.

The Charter Members of Bethesda Lodge were Brothers Edward W. Sartori, Charles T. Ward, Jr., James Hay ward, William Bogardus, W. L. Hobson, John R. Lyon, John Rattray, F. A. Richardson, G. H. Kendall, John P. Robertson, J. H. Pearson, and H. B. Potter. The original Charter granted to these Brethren, after working one year under dispensation, reads thus:

To all the Fraternity to whom these Presents shall come:

The Grand Lodge of the Most Ancient and Honorable Society of Free and Accepted Masons of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, send greeting

Whereas, a Petition has been presented to us by Edward W. Sartori, Chas. T. Ward, Jr., James Hayward, William Bogardus, W. L. Hobson, John R. Lyon, John Rattray, F. A. Richardson, Geo. H. Kendall, John P. Robertson, J. H. Pearson, H. B. Potter, all Ancient Free and Accepted Masons praying that they, with such others as shall hereafter join them, may be erected and constituted a regular Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, which Petition appearing to us as tending to the advancement of Masonry, and the good of the Craft:

KNOW YE, THEREFORE, that we, the Grand Lodge aforesaid, reposing special trust and confidence in the prudence and fidelity of our beloved Brethren above named, have constituted and appointed, and by these presents do constitute and appoint them, and said E. W. Sartori, Chas. T. Ward, Jr., James Hayward, William Bogardus, W. L. Hobson, John R. Lyon, John Rattray, F. A. Richardson, G. H. Kendall, John P. Robertson, J. H. Pearson, H. B. Potter, a regular Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, under the tide and designation of BETHESDA LODGE, hereby giving and granting unto them and their successors, full power and authority to convene as MASONS within the City of Valparaiso, in the Republic of Chile, S. A., to RECEIVE and ENTER Apprentices, PASS Fellow Crafts, and RAISE Master Masons, upon payment of such moderate compensation for the same as may be determined by the said Lodge.

Also, to make choice of a Master, Wardens, and other Office Bearers Annually, or otherwise as they shall see cause; to receive and collect FUNDS, for the relief of poor and distressed Brethren, their Widows or Children; and, in general, to transact all matters relating to Masonry, which may to them appear to be for the good of the CRAFT, according to the Ancient Usages and Customs of Masons.
AND WE do hereby require the said Constituted Brethren to attend the Grand Lodge, at their Quarterly Communications, arid other meetings, by their Master and Wardens, or by Proxy, regularly appointed; also, to keep a fair and regular RECORD of all their proceedings, and to lay them before the Grand Lodge when required.

AND WE do enjoin upon our Brethren of the said Lodge, that they be punctual in the Quarterly payment of such sums as may be assessed for the support of the GRAND LODGE; that they behave themselves respectfully and obediently to their Superiors in office, and in all other respects conduct themselves as good MASONS.

AND WE do hereby declare the Precedence of said Lodge, in the GRAND LODGE and elsewhere, to commence from the 27th day of August, A.D. 1853, A.L. 5853.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, WE the GRAND MASTER and GRAND WARDENS, by Virtue of the Power and Authority to us committed, have hereunto set our Hands, and caused the Seal of the GRAND LODGE, to be affixed, at Boston, this Fourteenth day of December, Anno Domini 1854, and of Masonry, 5854.

Geo. M. Randall, Grand Master
Richard S. Spofford, Sr. Grand Warden
Jonas A. Marshall, Jr. Grand Warden

By order of the Grand Lodge.

Chas. W. Moore, Grand Secretary

This Charter was received, read and accepted at the Regular Communication of March 14, 1855.

Brother Edward W. Sartori was elected as the first Worshipful Master of Bethesda Lodge on December 14, 1853, and at that meeting, it was decided that this Lodge should continue the work of what was Pacific Lodge No. 1, and confer the degrees of Fellow Craft and Master Mason on those Brethren who had been initiated in said Lodge.

On January 18, 1854, the following names were added to those named in the Charter: J. S. Priest, T. B. Adams, W. Davis, J. Stevenson, Peter Oswald, J. Anderson, F. B. Wells, J. W. Garland, W. Walker, J. Mollet, G. H. Foot and J. Heywood, making a total of twenty-four Brethren constituting Bethesda Lodge.

The first work undertaken by Bethesda Lodge was to confer the sublime degree of Master Mason upon Bro. Alfred Andrews on January 27, 1854, who had previously received his first and second degrees in Pacific Lodge No. 1.

During the course of one hundred years, Bethesda Lodge has held 2894 meetings; 1216 applications for degrees and affiliations have been received and acted upon, while degrees conferred were: Initiations, 738; Passings, 682; Raisings, 653; Affiliations, 184. The Lodge at the present time is composed of: Honorary Members, 6; Master Masons, 86; Fellow Crafts, 2; Entered Apprentices, 4 — total, 94.

In the year 1854, the custom of celebrating St. John's Day, June 24th, was instituted; the Lodge was opened at 12 noon on the first, second and third degrees, appropriate remarks made by the Worshipful Master and others, and then closed again in the same manner. This custom, however, died out about the year 1875.

In the year 1855, the first District Deputy Grand Master was appointed by the Grand Lodge, this high office falling to the distinguished Brother Charles T. Ward, Jr. This appointment was resented by the Worshipful Master of the Lodge, Bro. E. W. Sartori, who refused to accept the authority or recognize such an appointment, which attitude caused a serious split among the Brethren. Some trouble was experienced in the election of officers for the year 1855-56, but after repeated attempts, the election of officers finally took place on November 17, Bro. E. W. Sartori and eight other members having demitted on November 15.

The office of District Deputy Grand Master was held by Bro. Charles T. Ward, Jr. from 1855 to 1860, and has been held successively up to the present time by Brothers George H. Kendall, H. P. Bourchier, Rev. David Trumbull, Peter Ewing, George Masters, Rev. Frank Thompson, David Urquhart, James Walls, Joseph S. McDonald, Gustav Bowski, and Albert E. Jones.

In June, 1857, a petition was presented to Bethesda Lodge asking for recommendation to open Ward Lodge in Tongoy, but same was not supported, being considered premature. In September, 1857, a similar petition was received for the opening of Hiram Lodge at Copiapo, which was put forward and duly authorized by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts on December 15, 1857, and Charter granted December 14, 1859. In April 1869, owing to difficulties of meeting in sufficient numbers, this Lodge requested to be removed to the Port of Caldera, which was granted by Grand Lodge on September 2, 1869, but even then it does not seem to have been successful because there is no record of it in Grand Lodge Proceedings after 1871, and in September 1877 the Recording Grand Secretary reported that the Charter of Hiram Lodge of Copiapo, Chile, which had ceased to exist, had been forwarded by Rev. Dr. Trumbull, District Deputy for Chile, and had been placed among the archives of the Grand Lodge.

In August, 1858, Bethesda Lodge was asked to recommend a Charter from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for a new Lodge in Valparaiso, to be called Republican Lodge. The name was subsequently changed to Southern Cross, and a dispensation was granted as requested. The first meeting of this Lodge was held on the 28th day of December, 1858, and worked until February, 1860, when it finally closed down.

From February, 1858, to May of the same year, Bethesda Lodge was in recess, owing to a revolution's having broken out in Chile. In August, 1859, the then District Deputy Grand Master formed a District Grand Lodge, the principal officers being: Wor. Charles T. Ward, Jr., D. G. M., Wor. George H. Kendall, D. S. G. W., and Wor. James Heywood, D. J. G. W., the object being to give counsel to the subordinate Lodges and maintain the integrity of the Ancient York Rite. Bethesda Lodge doubted the legality of such a Lodge and refused to acknowledge it, and as no further mention is made regarding same, it is presumed it died a natural death.

On the 24th day of May, 1862, the Grand Lodge of Chile, working under the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, was established in Valparaiso, and having been recommended by Bethesda Lodge, the Grand Lodge of Chile was recognized by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts on December 30, 1862. On February 16, 1863, a letter from our Grand Lodge was read giving us authority to recognize the Grand Lodge of Chile and its subordinate Lodges which, at that time, were Union Fraternal and Progreso. Ever since then, the relations between the two Grand Lodges and its subordinate Lodges have been very cordial indeed.

The Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Chile, Most Worshipful Orestes Frodden, was present at the Quarterly Communication of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts March 8,1950, having been invited by the then Grand Master, M. W. Roger Keith. That same evening, Most Worshipful Brothers Roger Keith and Melvin M. Johnson were made Honorary Members of the Grand Lodge of Chile and M.W. Brother Frodden was presented with the Henry Price Medal by our Grand Master, M. W. Roger Keith. Bethesda Lodge was also very pleased to have the Grand Master of Chile, M. W. Brother Orestes Frodden, as our guest at our special communication on September 27, 1952, when the installation of officers for the ensuing year took place.

On January 11, 1869, a petition, signed by fourteen Master Masons, was put before the Lodge asking Bethesda to recommend that the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts grant a Charter for a new Lodge to be called Aconcagua, to meet in Valparaiso. This was put forward and Aconcagua Lodge was started in February, 1870, and worked regularly until September, 1897, after which date it seems to have fallen off, as on September 11, 1901, the following was recorded in Grand Lodge: "The Recording Grand Secretary announced that Aconcagua Lodge of Chile had long been in a disorganized condition, and for the past two years, had not held any regular meetings. After considerable trouble the newly appointed and very efficient District Deputy Grand Master of the Chile District, R.W. and Rev. Brother Frank Thompson, had recovered the Charter of the Lodge, which was now presented. On motion of the Recording Grand Secretary, the surrender was accepted."

On November 14, 1870, Bethesda Lodge was requested by several Masons to recommend them to the Grand Lodge of Scotland for a Warrant to establish a Lodge in Valparaiso, which they did, Lodge Star & Thistle No. 509 being inaugurated in August, 1871. This new Lodge was granted the use of the building which, at that time, was rented by Bethesda Lodge. Lodge Star & Thistle No. 509 worked until September, 1879, when it went into recess to re-open in September, 1894, continuing their successful working up to the present time.

In June, 1872, Lodge of Harmony No. 1411 was founded in Valparaiso under Charter from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of England, and was granted the use of our lodge-rooms.

On September 12, 1875, several Brethren in Santiago petitioned Bethesda Lodge for a recommendation for a Charter from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for a new Lodge to be formed in Santiago called Huelen, which received due attention, a Charter being granted and the first meeting held on July 15, 1876.

In January, 1877, Bethesda Lodge was requested by several Masons to recommend them to the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, to accompany the recommendation already given them by the Lodge of Harmony No. 1411. This request was granted February 15, 1877, and Lessing Lodge was founded in Valparaiso in October, 1877, working under the auspices of the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, and at their request, were granted the use of our lodge-rooms. On October 17, 1904, the Worshipful Master of Lessing Lodge presented Bethesda Lodge with a golden Square for the use of our Worshipful Master, as a token of the friendship and brotherly love of his Lodge on the occasion of Bethesda's 50th Anniversary. This golden Square has been worn by all the presiding Masters since it was presented to the Lodge.

On February 8, 1913, Bethesda Lodge was honored with a visit from the Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, Most Worshipful Everett C. Benton. M. W. Brother Benton was the first reigning Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts to visit his Lodges in foreign parts. Although Bethesda was in its 60th year when the happy event took place, the members were proud of the honor conferred and gladly welcomed their Grand Master.

In the year 1915, Right Worshipful David Urquhart was named District Grand Master for the Chile District and was duly installed as such on Friday, December 10, 1915, by Right Worshipful Francis Chevallier-Boutell, District Grand Master for the District of South America, Southern Division, English Constitution, at a special meeting of the District Grand Lodge held in Valparaiso, under the banner of the Lodge of Harmony No. 1411.

In May, 1916, the District Grand Lodge was organized, the principal officers being: David Urquhart, D.G.M.; Fred. J. Harper, D.D.G.M.; James Walls, D.S.G.W.; Ernest E. Wells, D.J.G.W.; Walter Winsor, D.G. Secretary. On August 25,1919, R. W. Brother David Urquhart passed away and R. W. James Walls acted as District Grand Master, by virtue of his seniority in the District Grand Lodge at the time. On June 9, 1920, the District Grand Lodge was dissolved, the Most Worshipful Grand Master appointing R. W. James Walls as his District Deputy Grand Master.

On March 27, 1925, Bethesda Lodge was highly honored by the visit of the reigning Grand Master, Most Worshipful Dudley H. Ferrell, accompanied by Grand Marshal, R. W. Frank H. Hilton, and Brother Charles C. Balcom, Senior Warden of Fourth Estate Lodge, Boston.

On January 11, 1947, Worshipful Joseph William Wood, Past Master of Bethesda Lodge, and initiated in this Lodge on December 21, 1896, was presented with a Veteran's Medal by the District Deputy Grand Master, R. W. Albert E. Jones, by direction of the Grand Master, and on March 19, 1947, Worshipful Brother Wood was also presented with an album with the signatures of over one hundred Masons, members of Bethesda and the other Lodges in Chile.

It is indeed gratifying in going over the minutes of the Lodge for one hundred years to find that our Brethren have always adhered strictly to the Ancient Landmarks of the Order, maintaining cordial and fraternal relations with the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Chile and all its subordinate Lodges; with the Lodge of Harmony, Lodge Star & Thistle and Lessing Lodge, and at all times extending a most cordial welcome to visiting Brethren from all parts of the world.

Masonic Temple

On August 14, 1874, Brother Peter Robertson offered to erect a building for the use of Bethesda Lodge, which offer was accepted and according to the minutes, our present Temple was dedicated by the then District Deputy Grand Master, R.W. H. P. Bouchier, on May 8, 1875. The first move to buy the property was made by Lodge of Harmony No. 1411 in May 1900, but after fruitless attempts, the scheme fell through. Nothing further was done until May, 1911, when, according to the minutes, a motion was made by Brother F. J. Harper that we seriously consider the advisability of purchasing the building.

A committee was appointed and Lodges Harmony, Star & Thistle and Lessing invited to participate each in a quarter share, but Lodge of Harmony did not consider it feasible and retired, but the other three, seeing the necessity of acquiring a building wherein to hold our Masonic meetings, and finding nothing more suitable than the one we were occupying, each decided to contribute a third share and bid for same at the public auction to take place in August, 1911. This agreement was acted upon and the building was "knocked down" to the joint Lodges at $40,000, Chilean Currency. Steps were taken to get some corporation to hold the property in trust for the three Lodges, but they were not successful. The forming of a Club was then contemplated, getting as far as the drawing up of the Statutes, ready for the approval of the Chilean Government, when Lessing Lodge opposed this move.

It was finally decided to form a limited liability Society under the name of Sociedad la Comercial, so the statutes were drawn up forthwith and they were accepted by Government Decree No. 3126, October 31, 1913.

In June, 1927, Lodge of Harmony No. 1411 decided to become a partner in the ownership of the building, the other Lodges agreeing to the same upon a payment of $25,000 Chilean Currency by Lodge of Harmony for its quarter share. After payment of this sum by Lodge of Harmony, the ground floor of the building was completely transformed into a large hall, where we now have our dinners, etc.

In May, 1933, the Sociedad la Comercial was dissolved, and in September of the same year, it was legally transferred to our present Club Atlas.

OTHER

  • 1854 (Extensive committee report on petition, V-530; see above)
  • 1856 (Communications with the Grand Lodge of California, VI-36; see above)
  • 1865 (Communication regarding the death of President Lincoln, VII-28)

EVENTS

PRESENTATIONS, JANUARY 1909

From New England Craftsman, Vol. IV, No. 7, April 1909, Page 252:

No doubt the Masons of New England, especially those of Massachusetts, will be interested to read the two notes following which have been sent to the New England Craftsman from Chile. S. A. As is known to many there are three lodges located in Chile that are under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.

A large number of members and a throng of visiting Brethren attended a special communication of Bethesda Lodge, holden in Valparaiso, under charter from the Most. Wor. Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, on Monday evening, the 12th January, For the purpose of assisting in initiating into the mysteries of Freemasonry Mr. William Pollman, and also to witness two presentations. The latter took place immediately after the ceremony of initiation, Right Worshipful District Deputy Grand Master. Bro. David Urquhart, presiding.

The presentations took the form of two handsome Past Master's jewels and the recipients were two Past Masters of Bethesda Lodge who are very highly esteemed, Bros. Edward Thomas and Frederick James Harper. The D. D. G. M. in making the presentations remarked that Wor. Bro. Thomas was one of the oldest members of the Lodge and had always taken the profoundest interest in Masonry and furthermore that during his absence in Europe in 1908, while enjoying a well earned holiday, Bro. Thomas had acted as his "hilcrino." The Brethren wished tn testify to the able and conscientious manner in which he had discharged those duties, hence they had subscribed to present him with a jewel as "recuerdo" pf the occasion. In regard to Wor. Bro. Harper, although this brother was a comparatively young Mason, nevertheless the interest and zeal which he had shown for Masonry culminated in his being elected master of the Lodge during the Masonic year 1907-1908 and it was to mark their high appreciation of the manner in which he discharged the office of Master, that the brethren had also subscribed to present him with a jewel. After both of the recipients had feelingly and suitably respond ed the brethren were treated to a humour mis address, apropos of the presentations. by that "Grand Old Man," the Rev. Wor. Bro, frank Thompson.

The officers nf Bethesda Lodge, Valparaiso, Chile. South America, for the present year are as follows: Wor. Master, P. M. Bro. James Walls; Senior Warden, Bro. E. H. Trapnell; Junior Warden, Bro. W. S. Reeve; Chaplain. P. M. Rev. Bro. Frank Thompson; Treasurer, P. M. Bro. Wm. Wotherspoon; Secretary, Bro. W. B. Reid; Marshal, Bro. Laverick; Senior Deacon, Bro. Wm. Askew; Junior Deacon, Bro. H. J. Mundy; Senior Steward, Bro. T. Berkley; Junior Steward, Bro. E. W. Clark; Inner Guard, Bro. J. A. Fraser; Tyler, Bro. W. MacDonald.

The number of our Post Office box is 628 and we would be glad al all times to enter into correspondence with any of our Brethren in the States who are interested in the progress of Masonry in Chile.

INSTALLATION, SEPTEMBER 1909

From New England Craftsman, Vol. V, No. 2, November 1909, Page 67:

Bethesda Lodge, Valparaiso.
Written by authority and permission of the Wor. Master.

The Installation of Officers of a Masonic Lodge is always an auspicious event only appreciated by Masons; more especially is this so when the event takes place in a foreign country; it is then that the important office of D. D. G. M. is fully realized and its consequent responsibilities. Fortunately for the three Lodges in Chile working under the jurisdiction of the Most Wor. Grand Lodge of Mass. the office of D. D. G. M. is in very capable hands; Right Wor. P. M. Bro. David Urquhart being renowned for the enthusiastic interest which he takes in Freemasonry and his efforts to promote the general good of the Order by strenuously striving to foster and encourage a truly fraternal and sympathetic intercourse with all the Masonic bodies under different Grand Lodges in Chile.

A record number of brethren and visitors assembled at the Masonic Temple on Friday evening, the 24th September, for the purpose of witnessing the Installation of Wor. Bro. Ernest H. Trapnell as Master, and other Officers, for the ensuing Masonic year. 1909-1910. D. D. G. M. David Urquhart presided with P. M. Bro. Edward Thomas as D. D. Grand Marshal and it is indeed impossible to imagine anything more likely to impress one, than a ceremony of Installation conducted by these two brethren. The Officers installed were as follows: Bro. Ernest H. Trapnell, Worshipful Master; Bro. William Askew, Senior Warden: Bro. Ernest E. Wells, Junior Warden; Bro. Herbert John Mundy, Secretary; Bro. William B. Reid. Marshal; Bro. Thomas Berkley, Senior Deacon; Bro. Christian Doxrud, Junior Deacon; Bro. Robert Brough, Senior Steward; Bro. Archibald Leonard Armstrong, Junior Steward; Bro. Allan Maxton Brabazon, Inside Guard; Bro. William MacDonald, Tyler.

Much to the regret and sorrow of all, our venerable and beloved Past Masters, Bros. Rev. Frank Thompson and William Wotherspoon, were unavoidably absent owing to indisposition, hence the installation of these two Brethren as Chaplain and Treasurer respectively, was deferred until a later dale. The esteem and affection for these two old Past Masters was demonstrated by the many kindly words of sympathy expressed and both were voted a speedy recovery.

At the conclusion of the ceremony ample justice was done to the annual banquet prepared by the Bro. Tyler, the usual loyal toasts being duly honored. Perhaps none was more enthusiastically received that that of the Grand Lodge of Mass. proposed by the newly installed Master, Bro. Ernest H. Trapnell, and replied to by the D. D. G. M.

The whole proceedings of the evening was voted a huge success in every way and augurs well for the Success and prosperity of lic-thesda Lodge, indeed the general impression caused was that men may come and go, but Freemasonry in Valparaiso will live until time shall be no more.

H. J. MEONDY, Secretary.
Valparaiso, 5th October, 1909.

INSTALLATION, SEPTEMBER 1911

From New England Craftsman, Vol. VII, No. 2, November 1911, Page 65:

On the evening of September 27, Bethesda Lodge, Valparaiso, Chila, S. A., was convened for the purpose of installing the officers for the ensuing Masonic year.

A record meeting it was too, being upwards of one hundred Masons present, amongst whom were to be seen a special delegation from the Grand Lodge of Chile, representatives of Lodges Harmony 1411 (England), Star & Thistle 509 (Scotland), Lessing (Hamburg), Aurora (Chile), Independencia (Chile).

The District Deputy Grand Master, Right Worshipful Bro. D. Urquhart, his Marshal, Wor. Bro. W. Wotherspoon and suite were announced and admitted with due honors, the retiring Master, Worshipful Bro. James Walls vacating the chair and handing the Hiram to the district deputy grand master who announced the object of his official visit and requested Past Masters James Harper and L. Philippe to occupy the West and South respectively. The D. D. G. Marshal then presented the following officers for Installation: Frederick J. Harper, Worshipful Master; Arthur G. Dovey, Senior Warden; Charles P. Laverick, Junior Warden; William Wotherspoon (PM), Treasurer; William Kennedy, Secretary; Arnold A. Smith (PM), Chaplain; Herbert A. Munday, Marshal; John S. Lennox-Robertson, Senior Deacon; William M. Housden, Junior Deacon; Archibald L. Armstrong, Senior Steward; Peter Cordiglia, Junior Steward; Greville E. Dunnage, Inside guard.

The District Deputy Grand Master conducted the ceremony in his usual dignified and graceful style and after the Grand Marshal had duly proclaimed the newly installed officers, Rt. Wor. Bro. Urquhart handed the Hiram to Wor. Master Harper, charging him to keep up the good name and standard of work of Bethesda Lodge.

After the ceremony the Brethren retired to the supper-room where a sumptuous banquet had been prepared and amid song and mirth a pleasant time was spent as the following programme will testify:

Programme.
Toast—The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Wor. Bro. F. J. Harper (Bethesda); Song— The Young Royalist, Wor. Bro. H. M. Smith (Harmony); Reply — The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Rt. Wor. Bro. David Urquhart (Bethesda); Cello Selection — Bro. W. Kennedy (Bethesda); Toast — The Grand Lodge of Chile (in Spanish), Rt. Wor. Bro. David Urquhart (Bethesda); Song— Love's Old Sweet Song, Bro. J. M. Eaglesome (Star & Thistle); Song — The Windmill, Wor. Bro. H. M. Smith (Harmony); Toast — The Grand Lodge of England, Wor. Bro. James Walls (Bethesda); Reply — The Grand Lodge of Chile, Wor. Bro. Danto (Lo: "Independencia"); Song — I am sitting by the stile, Mary, Bro. Leitch (Star & Thistle); Reply — The Grand Lodge of England, Wor. Bro. A. Gemmell (Harmony); Speech and Song — Regatrum … Captain de Navio Bro. Lopez (Lo: "Aurora"); Toast — The Grand Lodge of Scotland, Wor. Bro. Arnold Smith (Bethesda); Cello Selection — The Broken Melody, Bro. Wm. Kennedy (Bethesda); Speech — Bro. Freile (Ecuadorian Consul), (Lo: "Independencia); Song— Sing Me To Sleep, Bro. J. M. Eaglesome (Star & Thistle); Reply — The Grand Lodge of Scotland, Wor. Bro. J. Struthers (Star & Thistle); Recitation — Tam o' Shanter, Bro. T. Lauder (Star & Thistle); Speech — Wor. Bro. F. J. Harper (Bethesda); Toasts Sister Lodges, Wor. Bro. James Harper (Bethesda); Song — The Village Blacksmith, Bro. Leitch (Star & Thistle); Speech — Captain de Corbeta, Bro. Lagos (Lojia "Caupolican" 37); Song — Bro. W. M. Reid (Bethesda); Toast — W. M. and Officers, Past, Present, Rt. Wor. Bro. D. Urquhart (Bethesda); Auld Lang Syne.

Wor. Bro. F. J. Harper, when making the first toast of the evening made special mention of his recent visit to Boston and his interview with the Grand Master, Grand Recording Secretary, Grand Librarian and others due to which he felt that Bethesda Lodge was in close touch with the M. W. Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and hoped the Grand Master, Most Wor. Bro. Dana J. Flanders would fulfill his promise to him and visit Chile this year; where a hearty and fraternal welcome awaits him.

Valparaiso, September 30, 1911.

INSTALLATION, OCTOBER 1913

From New England Craftsman, Vol. IX, No. 3, December 1913, Page 83:

Installation of the Officers of Bethesda Lodge
Valparaiso, Chile, South America, October 1, 1913

DavidUrquhart1909.jpg

The following communication of the Secretary of Bethesda Lodge comes from so far and is so full of loyalty to the Grand Master and the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts that we feel that it will be read with interest by Massachusetts Masons at least and perhaps by others of New England.

The Installation Ceremony of Bethesda Lodge, holding under the Most Wor. the Grand Lg. of Mass., took place on October 1st, 1913 in the presence of numerous Past Masters and Master Masons.

The Ceremony of Installation was Performed by R. W. David Urquhart, District Deputy Grand Master, and the impressive Investure of the Master and Officers was a never-to-be-forgotten event. Masters and Representatives from nearly all the Sister lgs. in Southern America were present, and were in accord in pronouncing the Ceremony as being indeed memorable.

The Master and Officers for the year 1913-1914 are as follows: Charles P. Laverick, Master; John Lennox-Robertson, Senior Warden; Herbert J. Munday, Junior Warden; David Embry, Treasurer; William Shaw, Secretary; William B. Reid, Marshal; W. James Walls, Chaplain; James O. Fyfe and Alfred Curtis, Deacons; Hugh R. McCullock and Arthur Sterling, Stewards; Percy C. Woolvett, Inner Guard; Ernest E. Wells, Organist; James Smith, Tyler.

After the Investiture of the Master and Officers, R. W. David Urquhart, pronounced an impressive discourse in his usually masterly manner, complimenting the Lodge on having chosen such representative officers; and concluded his speech with sound words of advice, and stated he was sure that as the Master and Officers were thoroughly acquainted with their duties the work would be to the credit of Bethesda Lodge, and the glory of the Most Wor. Grand Lg. of Mass., and a by-word amongst the Masons of Valparaiso.

The Master, on behalf of himself and his officers, thanked R. W. David Urquhart for his kind words and also thanked him for his presence there, and eulogised him on the super-excellence of his work of Installation.

The Master desired that he would convey their greetings and sincere wishes to their far-distant Grand Lodge, the M. W., and the G. L. of Mass., whom he so ably represented.

The Worshipful Master welcomed the Past Masters, Officers and Brethren of visiting Sister Lodges, and the unattached Masons who were assisting, and fervently hoped that the cordial and fraternal relations existing between all the Lodges in Chile (Chilian. Scot, English, German and American) would, if it were possible, be increased and that all would work in harmony for the advancement of Masonry in general and humanity at large.

BethesdaBanquetHall.jpg
Banquet Hall

Many and eulogistic were the greetings from the P.M.s, and Masters of visiting lodges, and their regards for the M. W. G. L. of Mass. were indeed evident from the warm words of appreciation spoken by all.

The work of Installation being terminated, the brethren adjourned to the adjacent banqueting hall, where a sumptuous repast was served, the tasteful decorations creating a pleasing effect, and the concord between the Chilian and foreign masons was very evident by the animated and fraternal greetings which ensued. Hung around with flags of Chile, America and Great Britain (with the framed photograph of the M. W. G. M. of Mass., Everett C. Benton, to break their outline) the universal nature of Masonry was vividly brought to mind.

The toast of the evening, the M. W. G. L. of Mass. was proposed by the Worshipful Master, who referred to the visit of the M. W. G. M. Everett C. Benton as being a landmark in their history, and an honour which had never before been vouchsafed to them in the whole of their eventful career of (!0 years. He desired to couple with the toast of G.L. the name of R. W. D. D. G. M. David Urquhart, and the toast was received with éclat and drank with enthusiasm.

Upon rising to respond to this toast of G. L., R. W. David Urquhart, after the cheering had subsided, thanked the Wor. Master for his words and the brethren for their reception, and spoke as only he can speak, and was saluted at the termination of his speech by He's a jolly good fellow and cheers.

The usual toasts to the G. Lodges of Chile, England, Scotland, etc. were drunk with enthusiasm, and musical items added not a little to the pound of enjoyment, and midnight saw the termination of one of the most impressive and enjoyable Masonic ceremonies enacted under the roof of one of the Lodges, holding under the G.L. of Mass. in the far South.

Health to the Bethesda Lodge, her Master, Officers and Members.

60TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, DECEMBER 1913

From New England Craftsman, Vol. IX, No. 5, February 1913, Page 161:

Never since Freemasonry was imported into Chili has there been held such a successful gathering as took place on Saturday, December 13th, when Bethesda Lodge holding Charter from Grand Lodge of Mass., U. S. A., celebrated their 60th anniversary at 8.30 p. m.

The Lodge was opened and Deputations were received from Grand Lodge of Chili, Harmony, Star and Thistle, Lessing, Independencia, Aurora and Progreso Lodges, and King Cyrus R. A. Chapter, who again showed their colours on this occasion. R. W. David Urquhart, District Deputy Grand Master and his Grand Marshal was then announced and received with grand honours, the W. M. vacating the chair. The Right Worshipful District Deputy explained the object of the meeting and deplored the absence of their esteemed Bro. Worshipful James L. Bennett, their oldest member and P. M., who has been connected with Bethesda Lodge for the last fifty-five years, he, the speaker, having to preside with his forty years' service. The D. D. then called on Worshipful F. J. Harper to give a historical account of the work done by Bethesda Lodge during its lifetime. It was received by marks of approbation from the brothers present.

At the close he asked R. W. D. D. David Urquhart to place himself before the altar where he had the pleasure of pinning on his breast the Anniversary Jewel as being the oldest member present.

The Presiding Officer, Bro. Urquhart, then asked his Marshal to present before him Worshipful James Harper, Ernest H. Trapnell and Ernest E. Wells, when he placed upon each of their breasts a Past Master's Jewel as a token of fraternal recognition for services rendered to Bethesda Lodge during their term of office. Past Master James Harper answered for himself and the other brethren, thanking the Lodge for the honour conferred upon them. Each member then received the Anniversary Jewel, after which the Lodge was closed.

When the programme of speeches, songs and recitations was gone into at the interval, refreshments were served in the ante room, the brethren then entered the Lodge room where the concert was continued. At the close, after replies had been given from Bro. Lopez for Grand Lodge of Chili, Bro. Galloway, Grand Lodge of England, Bro. Buchanan, Grand Lodge of Scotland, and Bro. Seilfield, Grand Lodge of Hamburg, the Chairman then thanked P. M. W. G. Brower, who had come from St. John's Lodge Concepción, to attend the meeting. A letter was read from W. M. A. Styles, Huelen Lodge, Santiago, thanking Bethesda Lodge for the invitation to assist, but was unable to do so.

The meeting was then adjourned to the banquet hall, where tea and cakes were served and disposed of by the brethren. The meeting closed by singing Auld Lang Syne.

From New England Craftsman, Vol. IX, No. 7, April 1914, Page 238:

Bethesda Lodge, Valparaiso, Chili, S. A., under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, celebrated its 60th anniversary Saturday, December 13, 1913.

The occasion was of marked importance and attracted the presence of distinguished brethren from several jurisdictions. A complete account of the exercises with the historical address of Wor. Bro. Frederick J. Harper has been printed in a neat booklet one of which it is our privilege to receive.

Rt. Wor. David Urquhart, district deputy grand master was formally received and presided during the evening. There was a delegation from the Grand Lodge of Chili. The Grand Lodges of England, Scotland and Hamburg were represented by brethren who responded for their respective grand lodges. There was also presentation of commemoration jewels.

Wor. Brother Harper's address began with the founding of the Lodge in 1853, mentioning the names of Grand Master Geo. M. Randall, and Grand Secretary Chas. W. Moore, both of whom arc well remembered by our senior brethren. The charter was a considerable time in reaching Valparaiso and was not read and accepted by the Lodge until March 14, 1855.

There was some friction in the management of the Lodge in the early days which was happily ended in a short time and since the end of 1856 prosperity and good fellowship have prevailed.

The historian refers in a pleasant way to the visit made by Grand Master Everett C. Benton to Bethesda Lodge last year, saying, "The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts is the only Grand Lodge in the United States of America having subordinate Lodges outside its borders, and this honour coupled with the fact that our Grand Lodge is the oldest in the United States should make us proud to be at this time celebrating our 60th year of uninterrupted and successful working under Charter from such a Grand Lodge.

Wor. Everett C. Benton was the first Grand Master of the Most Wor. Grand Lodge of Massachusetts to visit his Lodges in foreign parts and although Bethesda was in its 60th year when the happy event took place, the members were proud of the honour conferred and pleased to welcome their Grand Master.

Once the Panama Canal is opened, communication with the United States will be more rapid, and we extend to future Grand Masters of Massachusetts the same hearty welcome shown to the Most Wor. Everett C. Benton in February last.


MEMORIALS

HENRY H. ROGERS d. 1856

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XVI, No. 2, November 1856, Page 63:

Valparaiso, Sept, 13, 1856.

Our late Br. H. H. Rogers, whilst returning from England, died on board the Steamer Lima, and was buried at sea; the Brethren of this place hearing of his loss met in Lodge, and after various resolutions, a Committee was appointed to address a suitable Memorial to his family and reported as follows:

Edmund Kendall, Sec, Bethesda Lodge.
To the Brethren of Bethesda Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons:

The Committee appointed to write a memorial to the family of our late. Bro. Henry H. Rogers, beg to submit the following : To Henry H. Rogers, Esq., and Family Connections:

Your late beloved son and relative, Mr. Henry H. Rogers, was a Member of Bethesda Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons in this place, and his mourning Brethren and fellow Members, in tendering their sympathy and consolation under such trying affliction, feel it to be their duty to address this short memorial to his Family.

Brother Rogers from the moment he was admitted into our Society, became impressed with the objects and principles of it, and was ever a regular attendant at our Meetings and a zealous supporter of the Order; his conduct and deportment as a gentleman and a Mason obtained for him the esteem and Brotherly love of every Member of the Lodge, and on none can the blow, which the distressing intelligence of his death has inflicted, fall more heavily than on those whose painful task it is to address the present lines. Brother Rogers had left us for a season to travel, and all were looking earnestly forward to his return, which they believed close at hand, that they might have the satisfaction of congratulating him in having passed scatheless through the dangers and perils of his voyage, and welcome him once again to our Hall of Friendship ; but it was the will of Divine Providence that such should not be, rather that his labors here below should cease and that he be called to a better Lodge above, to that " House not made with hands, eternal in the heavens."

Death is the doom of all, and Man, the favored creature of his hands, whilst rejoicing in his position and his strength knows not how soon he may be cut down to wither in the dust. The Grand Architect of the Universe created him and placed bounds that he cannot pass, and though melancholy are the reflections and bitter the regrets which arise when those who are near and dear leave us for ever in this world, let us not "sorrow as those who have no hope," but let us look for support and comfort to Him who can give as well as take away. Let us cherish the consolation, that "we may go to them though they cannot return to us."

Signed:
Geo. H. Kendall, W.M.
James Heywood, S.W.
George Delano, J. W.,
Committee


GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

OTHER BROTHERS


DISTRICTS

1856: Chile District

1867: Chile District

1883: Chile District

1911: Chile District

1927: Chile District

2003: Chile District

2010: Panama District


LINKS

Massachusetts Lodges