IndianOrchard

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INDIAN ORCHARD LODGE

Location: Springfield

Chartered By: Everett C. Benton

Charter Date: 03/13/1912 1912-56

Precedence Date: 05/20/1911

Current Status: in Grand Lodge Vault; merged with Shawmont Lodge to form Indian Orchard - Shawmont Lodge on 09/09/1982.


PAST MASTERS

Need living PMs

  • George W. Miller, 1911, 1912
  • Henry S. Keyes, 1913
  • Hugh M. Cramond, 1914
  • Arthur L. Lanckton, 1915
  • Charles Bromage, 1916
  • Valentine B. Morse, 1917
  • Llewellyn D. Carey, 1918
  • Thomas H. Kirkland, 1919
  • James Greenaway, 1920
  • James R. Baldrick, 1921
  • Frank L. Briggs, 1922
  • Gilbert N. Leete, 1923; SN
  • Maurice Marsden, 1924
  • Vincent J. Irwin, Jr., 1925
  • George B. Robertson, 1926
  • Ernest G. Benjamin, 1927
  • Harold S. Streeter, 1928; N
  • James Matthew, 1929
  • William E. Crooker, 1930
  • Alfred Shaw, 1931
  • Herbert S. Terrill, 1932
  • Frank F. Jackson, 1933
  • Carroll C. Moulton, 1934
  • Herbert H. Prentice, 1935
  • E. Raymond Harris, 1936
  • Henry C. Monighetti, 1937
  • Willard F. Henry, 1938
  • Charles H. Gardner, 1939
  • Milton A. Peck, 1940
  • Frederick N. Bromage, 1941
  • Fred F. Lewis, 1942
  • Ernest Morton, 1943
  • Jacob L. Suydan, 1944; SN
  • Donald M. Stewart, 1945
  • Francis G. Watson, 1946, 1957, 1970; N
  • Edward A. Powers, 1947
  • Kenneth C. Cousins, 1948
  • George W. Parker, 1949
  • Alfred L. Davis, 1950
  • Howard F. Streeter, 1951
  • George W. Williams, 1952
  • Robert G. Jennings, 1953, 1954
  • William F. Sweetland, Jr., 1955
  • Stuart Duncan, 1956
  • Walter H. Wooley, 1957
  • Laurence L. Bennett, 1958
  • Frederick H. Greensmith, Jr., 1959; N
  • William J. Vasa, 1960
  • Wallace R. Edwards, 1961
  • David L. Stone, 1962
  • Lester R. Streeter, 1963
  • Roy L. Watts, 1964
  • Donald N. Cheetham, 1965
  • Hector A. Meunier, 1966
  • Kenneth E. Emery, 1967
  • George E. Cook, 1968
  • Robert H. Black, 1969
  • David H. DeBell, 1970
  • Ralph J. Marra, 1971
  • Robert H. Phoenix, Jr., 1972
  • Stanley F. Sheldon, 1973
  • Herman T. Lilja, Jr., 1974
  • George R. Johnson, 1975
  • Raymond S. Chant, 1976
  • Frank D. Watson, 1977
  • Edwin H. Carpenter, Jr., 1978; N
  • William Elian, III, 1979
  • Azor A. Kay, 1980
  • Donald S. Young, 1981
  • Frank G. Carzello, 1982

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Dispensation: 1911
  • Petition for Charter: 1912
  • Consolidation Petition (with Shawmont Lodge): 1982

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1936 (25th Anniversary)
  • 1961 (50th Anniversary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1920 1921 1924 1925 1933 1940 1942 1959 1967 1973 1980

HISTORY

25TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, MAY 1936

From Proceedings, Page 1936-58:

By Wor. Jeremiah R. Baldrick.

When approached by your Chairman of this most important event and informed that I had been appointed Historian, the task seemed more complex than when our first decade of existence was recorded in Nineteen Hundred and Twentv-One. The question arose as to what is a history, or rather, what and how much should we inflict on this assembly with time so valuable and quests that come but once in twenty-five years.

The modern dictionary defines history thus: "A systematic record of past events. Past events in general." Further investigation discloses the word history originates from the Greek, meaning "Inquiry." The systematic record of past events we have in our records, so let us tonight endeavor to reconstruct a past period and make ir live once more, and from it may you, our guests, and you, our younger members, learn why this, our Lodge, has prospered and grown not in pillars of marble and stone but rather in pillars of good fellowship and brotherly love.

The events attending the formation of Indian Orchard Lodge have been written and rewritten, transmitted from Charter member to initiate, from father to son, until they have become legend. And well should this legend be sacred to us who enjoy the harvest of the ground work laid by those pioneers, our Charter members, who with but little of a material nature, but an abundance of energy and determination, established in this community another link in our Fraternity.

And so, for a moment let us pause and call the roll of our Charter members, rejoicing with the answer "Present," regretting the absence of those unable to be with us, and mourning those who answer in spirit only.

  • Charles Bromage
  • Franklin D. Brown
  • William S. Crofoot
  • Hugh M. Crammond
  • Albert J. Dexter
  • Walter H. Duncan
  • James Greenawav
  • George H. Gibb
  • James G. Harris
  • Ernest Haslam
  • James Jardine
  • Andrew O. Jardine
  • William A. Johnson
  • Frank W. Johnson
  • Andrew J. Johnson
  • Robert F. Karnes
  • Henry S. Keyes
  • Thomas H. Kirkland
  • William H. Leab
  • Frank O. Lovejoy
  • Thomas Leytham
  • Arthur L. Lanckton
  • Charles D. J. Leach
  • William H. Mason
  • James McGeown
  • Thomas H. McKinney
  • Valentine B. Morse
  • George W. Miller
  • John Robinson
  • James W. Sime
  • Ames W. Slate
  • Samuel F. Smith
  • Henry C. Spence
  • Merrill E. Streeter
  • Ralph W. Wight

We must not pass on without once more repeating those memorable words that have been written into early meetings of the club, our records and histories — A Lodge could and would be formed. We of Indian Orchard Lodge know from whence they came and we who have had the privilege of serving as officers, have heard these or similar words on many occasions.

May I present to our members and guests, the Father of Indian Orchard Lodge — Brother Merrill E. Streeter. To all of us, young and old, he is "Mel." From his own choice he has been just a member, but a very active one. His activities in and contributions to our Lodge would alone make a history.

We were fortunate indeed in having as our first Master — Worshipful Brother George W. Miller. For many years Worshipful Brother Miller has been active in our Lodge and he has been an inspiration to officers and members. We are happy indeed that he is with us this evening.

And so we move on through our period of beginning. After a short interval of meeting in a rented hall on Main Street, Indian Orchard, this courageous band of pioneers purchased the Temple we now occupy. It was dedicated in due and Ample Form on the premises and the consecration continued until a late hour in Springfield.

The exact proceedings of this part of the ceremony were never duly recorded, but like the events of our formation, have become legend. To those who followed in later years, many mysteries are yet unsolved. We do know, however, on good authority, that there was delivered at this later meeting an oration on The Flag of Our Country.

Our Master at the time, Worshipful Brother Hugh Crammond, a noble Scot, apparently had one great ambition, namely that our Temple should be duly dedicated and properly furnished. The Scotch have always had certain characteristics of thrift but our good brother Hugh forgot this tradition for the day.

His successor, Worshipful Brother Arthur Lanckton, entered the scene with a Temple properly dedicated and well furnished, but with very little in the treasury. With Yankee ingenuity Worshipful Brother Lanckton turned the deficit into a surplus during a very successful year. It was brother Lanckton who fed the five thousand on the equivalent of five loaves and seven fishes. It was my privilege to be one of his candidates, and I cherish the memory of those meetings when we brought our own refreshments and smoked our own cigars.

The next event of interest seems to have occurred when Worshipful Brother Thos. Kirkland became Master. It was Brother Tom who opened the fronts of the somber Prince Albert Coats and arrayed his officers in tail coats and expansive white shirt fronts. We must not pass on without recognition of the great service rendered this lodge by Worshipful Brother Kirkland. He has served as chairman of our building corporation. He has given of time and energy most generously to manage the affairs of the corporation with results that are appreciated by all. A lawyer by profession, he has during my twenty years of memory maintained offices in the village of Indian Orchard for evening appointments, from seven to eight, in his private suite, and from eight until midnight in the Masonic Club Rooms.

The Church in which we are assembled and Indian Orchard Lodge, have been very closely allied. The banquet hall and this auditorium have been used for many of our activities and we in turn have contributed very liberally to the support of the Church.

But we are still indebted very deeply to this Church for a contribution — he is with us tonight — Reverend Worshipful Brother Frank L. Briggs. He presided over this parish for some twelve years, served us as Chaplain and later became our Master. The task of writing the accomplishments of our beloved Brother Briggs, his influence in this community, and in our Lodge, must be left to one who follows, who possesses far greater ability than your present Historian. But, may I add my small contribution. Indian Orchard Lodge was honored in having as Master, Worshipful Brother Frank L. Briggs, a man loved by all, who practiced in every walk of life the ideals of Masonry, and who believed —

"There is so much bad in the best of us
And so much good in the worst of us
That it hardly behooves any of us
To talk about the rest of us."

And this Church has given us another contribution. The present Minister, Reverend Brother Lohmann, has been our Chaplain and has worked with us in every undertaking for the welfare of Church, Lodge, and Community.

After twenty years of existence as a successful institution the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge discovered in our membership one who qualified to wear the royal purple, and thus fair first District Deputy — Right Worshipful Brother James Matthew. The record and accomplishments of our Right Worshipful Brother Jim are not yet history. He is still actively engaged and I predict that some day in the not too distant future we may have a Past Grand Warden. We have tried to make him Mayor of our city, but we cannot determine his political faith, so have dedicated him to life service in our Fraternity. To best express our appreciation of his service to Indian Orchard Lodge I am forced to borrow the words of the poet —

"He seemed like one of us, and yet
As time went on we knew,
The things that most of us forgot
He found time to do.

Like us he worked from day to day
And earned about the same,
But he was first a call to pay
When grief or trouble came.

Although the needs that sorrow brings
As well as he we knew,
He was the one who did the thing
Which we were going to do.

Somehow the time he always found
A thoughtful friend to be,
He'd stop though in or outward bound,
The sick or sad to see.

And thus we learned from year to year,
He did the deeds of kindness
Which we had meant to do."

Our present Master, Worshipful Brother Raymond Harris, has the honor of presiding in this our twenty-fifth year, and on this occasion, our anniversary. Perhaps no Mason has had the unique experience of our Worshipful Brother Ray. Our present Temple was the Harris home. Worshipful Brother Ray came into the world in a part of this home which is now our Lodge-room, and has been elevated to the highest station in our power all in this same room. We have often wondered if he remembers the occasions when Mother Harris summoned him to the North East Corner, there to receive instruction.

We have been fortunate in having associated with us several members of neighboring Lodges. These Brethren have contributed in a large measure to the successful development and management of our club and building corporation. We deeply appreciate the service rendered by

  • Andrew Sproat
  • David Wilkinson
  • Miller Meeker
  • Robert Shirley, Sr.
  • John Bush
  • Harry Bush

It has not been my purpose to place special credit or recognition on any particular administration. It would be a difficult and tiresome task to review the accomplishments of each Master and his associates. The development of our Lodge has been the combined efforts of twenty-five administrations, each giving unselfishly his best effort to carry on the fine traditions of his predecessors and seeking no other reward than the conscious satisfaction of having been permitted to give his time and energy in the service of his fellow man.

To our original thirty-five Charter Members we have added 641 Initiates, and our membership today is 503.

Wc have had prosperous years and lean years.

The past five years have been very trying and discouraging, but our officers have met every situation with courage. The future lies ahead with an uncharted course. New problems will arise, perhaps more serious than any experienced in the past. I am sure when your Historian appears before you at the fiftieth milestone, he will review another era as successful as the past.

IN MEMORIAM

"We sigh for the sound of the voice that is silent, and the
touch of the hand that is still."
"The Lord of the Manor has walked in our garden, and has
plucked for Himself many of our beautiful flowers."

We have been with them and their families during trying hours of illness and bereavement. We have gone with them in procession and as individuals and returned with heavy hearts, but with a resolve to carry on the work they left unfinished.

Green be the turf above them,
Friends of our better days,
None knew them but to love them,
None named them but to praise.

50TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, MAY 1961

From Proceedings, Page 1961-81:

By Wor. James R. Baldrick.

It is a rare privilege and an honor to have been selected as historian for this our Fiftieth Anniversary. Little did I realize forty years ago, when preparing the data for our Tenth Anniversary in collaboration wtih Wor. Bro. George Miller, and again the review of the intervening years for our Twenty-fifth Anniversary, that I would be selected for this very important assignment this evening.

This is the last assignment, I assure you. There is a limit as to how long an individual can continue. I have passed the allotted time of three-score and ten, and perhaps should now be awarded the title of "Historian Emeritus" or, as we might term it in the business world, "Chairman of the Board". Again, as at our Twenty-fifth Anniversary, the question arises, "What is history?" and what and how much should we inflict on this assembly, with time so limited and distinguished guests that come but once in twenty-five years. The modern dictionary defines history thus: "A systematic record of past events, past events in general". Further investigation reveals the word history originates from the Greek meaning "inquiry".

The systematic record of past events we have in our records: so let us tonight reconstruct some of the outstanding events of past years and have them live once more, and from this may you, our guests, and you, our younger members, learn why this our Lodge has prospered and grown, not in pillars of marble and stone, but rather in pillars of good fellowship and brotherly love.

The events attending the formation of Indian Orchard Lodge have been written and rewritten, transmitted from charter member to initiate, from father to son, until they have become legend. And well should this legend be sacred to us who enjoy the harvest of the groundwork laid by those pioneers, "Our Charter Members", who with little of a material nature, but with an abundance of energy and determination established in this community of Indian Orchard another link in our Fraternity.

Of the thirty-five original charter members, we are privileged to have with us tonight the two surviving members:

  • Wor. Bro. Henry S. Keyes
  • Bro. Ernest Haslam

With these charter members, we were very fortunate in having the counsel and material assistance of six members affiliated with neighboring Lodges and Connecticut Lodges.

Of this group, we are privileged to have with us tonight the one surviving member, Brother Andrew Sproat, a member of St. John's Lodge, Hartford, Connecticut, and an Honorary Member of Indian Orchard Lodge.

Brother Sproat is the surviving member of the original "Indian Orchard Masonic Building Association", serving as a director and officer for more than forty years.

We must not pass on without once more repeating those memorable words that have been recorded in early meetings of the club, our Lodge records and histories:

"A Lodge could and would be formed." We of the older generation know from whence they came. Would that I could tonight present to you the father of our Lodge and originator of these wonderful words, Brother Merrill E. Streeter. To all of us, young and old, he was "Mel". From his own choice he was just a member, but a very active one. His activities and contributions to our Lodge would alone make history.

Few Lodges reaching the fiftieth milestone have the privilege of paying tribute in person to their second Master. Tonight we have that privilege and greet Wor. Bro. Henry S. Keyes, Master of 1913.

The Evangelical Church in Indian Orchard, now known as the First Congregational Church, has always been closely associated with our Lodge. We were very fortunate in having Rev. Bro. Frank L. Briggs as our Chaplain for many )'ears, and in 1922, have him as our Master. We are hoping to have Wor. Bro. Briggs with us tonight.

The task of writing the accomplishments of Wor. Bro. Briggs, and his influence in our community and in our Lodge was delegated, in our history of twenty-five years, to one who follows, possessing far greater ability than the historian of that period.

Twenty-five years have passed and I am faced with the same problem. And now, possessing no greater ability than twenty-five years ago, I believe we can best express our appreciation of Wor. Bro. Briggs by borrowing the words of the poet:

He seemed like one of us and yet
As time went on we knew
The things that most of us forget
He found time to do.

Like us, he worked from day to day
And earned about the same
But he was first a call to pay
When grief or trouble came.

Although the needs that sorrow brings
As well as he we knew,
He was the one who did the things
Which we were going to do.

Somehow the time he always found
A thoughtful friend to be.
He'd stop though in or outward bound
The sick or sad to see.

And thus we learned from year to year
He did the deeds of kindness
Which we had meant to do.

It has not been my purpose to place special credit or recognition on any particular administration. It would be a difficult task to review the accomplishments of each Master and his associate officers. The development and success of our Lodge has been the combined efforts of fifty administrations, each giving unselfishly of his best efforts to carry on the fine traditions of his predecessors, seeking no other reward than the conscious satisfaction of having been permitted to give his time and energy in the service of this great Fraternity.

During these fifty years, we have had forty-nine Masters. Two have served for two years:

  • Wor. George W. Miller, 1911-1912
  • Wor. Robert G. Jennings, 1953-1954

Our Lodge has been honored by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge in the appointment of three District Deputy Grand Masters:

  • R. W. Gilbert N. Leete
  • R. W. James Matthew
  • R. W. Harold S. Streeter

We have been further honored by the election of a Junior Grand Warden:

and the appointment of a Senior Grand Deacon;

  • R. W. Harold S. Streeter

Three of our members have been awarded the fifty-year Medal and tonight one more, Bro. Ernest Haslam, will be honored.

Briefly, let us make record of some important statistics. Begin
ning with thirty-five charter members, we reached the following:


  • On Tenth Anniversary: 363
  • On Twenty-fifth Anniversary: 489
  • Present Membership: 539

Our financial condition is excellent. Beginning with a deficit of twelve hundred dollars following our constitution in 1914, we now have a net worth of approximately twenty-five thousand dollars. We have had prosperous years and lean years. As the years pass, more of our members will have laid down the working tools and departed to that promised land.

The future lies ahead with an uncharted course. New problems will arise, perhaps more serious than any experienced in the past.

It remains for you of the younger generation to accept the challenge and carry on the fine tradition of our founders with that same old spirit of 1911 — "A Lodge could and would be formed." And now in 1961 let it be: "This Lodge will continue to grow and prosper." And when your historian records the events of the next fifty years, may he report that this prophecy of 1961 has been fulfilled.

We are indeed grateful for the opportunity of meeting tonight in this spacious auditorium. Our temple in Indian Orchard is small and could not accommodate the members we have here tonight. It is small, but we love it, and in tribute, we have left the lights burning and will return later to extinguish them when this ceremony has ended.

In Memoriam

By the hut of the peasant where poverty weeps
And nigh to the towers of the king,
Close, close to the cradle where infancy sleeps
And joy loves to linger and sing,
Lies a garden of light, full of heaven's perfume
Where never a teardrop is shed,
And the rose and the lily are ever in bloom,
'Tis the land of the beautiful dead.

Each moment of light a messenger comes
And beckons man over the way,
Through the heart throbs of widows and rolling of drums,
The army of mortals obey.
Our lips they have kissed but a motionless brow,
A face from each fireside has fled,
But we know that our loved ones are watching us now,
In the land of the beautiful dead.

Not a charm that we know 'ere the boundary was crossed,
And we stood in the valley alone;
Not a trait that we praised in our dear ones is lost,
They have fairer and lovelier grown.
As the lilies burst forth when the shadows of night
Into bondage at daybreak are led,
So they bask in the glow by the pillar of light
In the land of the beautiful dead.

We have been with them and their families during trying hours of illness and bereavement. We have gone with them in procession and as individuals and returned with heavy hearts, but with a resolve to carry on the work they left unfinished.

Worshipful Master, I thank you for this very rare privilege of having a part in this Fiftieth Anniversary Program.


GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

OTHER BROTHERS


DISTRICTS

1911: District 18 (Springfield)

1914: District 33 (Springfield)

1927: District 33 (Springfield)


LINKS

Massachusetts Lodges