GMRobinson

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SIMON W. ROBINSON 1792-1868

SimonWRobinson1915.jpg

Junior Grand Warden, 1837
Senior Grand Warden, 1838-1840
Deputy Grand Master, 1841-1843
Grand Master, 1846-1848


TERM

1846 1847 1848

MEMORIAL

FROM PROCEEDINGS, 1868

From Proceedings, Page VII-257:

"Another of the members of former years, an active participant and sharer in the fortunes of this Grand Lodge in its days of trial, and who was spared to behold its uprise and prosperity, has attained his higher degree of immortality, — the great elevation from earth to heaven.

Our late Past Grand Master, Simon Wiggin Robinson, was one beloved and respected by his brethren; one not endowed by brilliant qualities of mind and education, but the possessor of a heart filled with useful and generous qualities. There is a natural tendency which we all feel on occasions of this kind, to pass the limits of judicial accuracy in our tributes to the memory of those whom we honored and loved while living, and of whom we have been bereft. We do not scrupulously measure the words of kindness which flow from our hearts, struck with a personal and associated sorrow. I think, however, I do not fall into this natural and pardonable error, when I say that all things considered, we have lost one of the most faithful and kind brothers ever called to the chair of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts,

His Masonic career and relations are known to us all, and need not be recapitulated here. His characteristics for sterling good sense, fidelity, and truth are engraven on our hearts and will be held in our memories. Let our records show that these are there engrossed, and. therefore, I move that the following resolution be entered in our annals and a copy transmitted to his family:—

Whereas it has pleased Divine Providence to remove from us our late beloved Past Grand Master, Simon Wiggin Robinson,—

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge, in common with the officers and members of the subordinate Lodges of this jurisdiction, have sustained by the decease of their late venerable associate, a loss of a devoted and faithful brother, whose life has been consecrated to the duties of the good man, brother and citizen. A zealous friend and supporter of our order in every department, whose amiable personal qualities and virtues endeared him to all, and constitute the character of a truly worthy man."

FROM MOORE'S FREEMASON'S MONTHLY, 1868

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXVIII, No. 2, December 1868, Page 56:

IN MEMORIAM — SIMON W. ROBINSON.

Grand Orient, Boston, 14th Day of Marchesvan, 5629, A.^. H.^. answering unto Oct. 30, 1868, (V.^. E.^.)

The M.^.P.^. Sovereign Grand Commander to all Freemasons of the. A.^.A.^. Scottish Rite in the Northern Jurisdiction of the United States.

SORROW ! SORROW ! SORROW !

Brethren, — The Angel of Death has smitten us! Our Venerable and Illustrious Brother, Simon Wiggin Robinson, 33°, Past Sovereign Grand Commander and Active Member of our Supreme Council, departed this life on the sixteenth instant, at the ripe age of seventy-six years.

As a man he was universally beloved and respected; while, as a Mason, ho faithfully served his brethren, and received their confidence, esteem, and the highest honors in their gift, having been in the York Rite Grand Master of Masons, in Massachusetts ; Grand High Priest of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the same State,, and Grand Master of the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He ha.s gone down cloudless in the west, full of years and of honors.

In token of our respect for his memory, and sorrow for his loss, let the altars- and working tools of the Bodies in this jurisdiction be draped with the violet badge of mourning for the space of sixty days, and these letters be entered on record.

Given at the Grand Orient the day and year aforesaid,
Josiah H. Drummond,
Sovereign Grand Commander.

FROM MOORE'S FREEMASON'S MONTHLY, 1869

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXVIII, No. 4, February 1869, Page 128:

The Late Br. S. W. Robinson.— Cosmopolitan Consistory, of New York, held a "Lodge of Sorrow" on the 30th December last, in commemoration of the late Br. S. W. Robinson. The hall was suitably dressed, and the ceremonies are said to have been of a deeply impressive and interesting character. The eulogy was pronounced by Br. A. G. Goodall, and is spoken of as a finished production.

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXVIII, No. 6, April 1869, Page 183:

The following extract from the eloquent eulogy on the life and character of the late Brother Robinson, before Cosmopolitan Consistory, of New York, by Ill. Br. Albert G. Goodall, 33°, gives some particulars relative to the personal history of the deceased that have not appeared in our pages, but will be interesting to his many friends in this city : —

Simon Wiggin Robinson drew his first breath among the granite hills of New Hampshire, being born at New Hampton in that State, on the 19th day of February, 1792. His father, Captain Noah Robinson, a native of the same State, was a staunch and loyal citizen of the old school, and did honorable service for his country during our revolutionary struggle.

At the age of twenty, Br. Robinson was also in the service of his country, and, as Adjutant, was stationed at Portsmouth, N.H., during the war of 1812. At the close of the war, he left the army and located in Boston, where he entered into active commercial business, in which he continued until about 1845, when he retired with a moderate competency. He was twice happily married, and two sons, two daughters, and his widow, now survive him.

He was a member of the Legislature of Massachusetts in 18 —, but never entered into the active political arena, or became a partisan of any of those varied and exciting events that often sweep like a whirlwind over the land. During his active career, he studiously kept within bounds of all mankind, pursuing the even tenor of his way in all that constitutes a man, a citizen, and a Mason, maintaining throughout this long journey of life, a spotless character and an honored name.

What higher tribute can the living bestow upon the dead?

In his social relations he ever preserved that even, frank, truthful, pleasant disposition, that won for him the sincere esteem and attachment of a large circle of friends, which continued in the most harmonious concord during his long earthly existence.

The Masonic record of Ill. Br. Robinson, presents that same pure type of unblemished character that was so marked throughout his business and social life, and won for him a name that will long be cherished with fraternal recollection.

He was initiated in Mount Lebanon Lodge, Boston, on the 29th day of November, 1819; received the Fellow-Craft Degree, the same date; and raised to a Master Mason, January 20, 1820; admitted a member, February 28, same year; and was Worshipful Master of the Lodge for several years; serving also as Treasurer from 1828 to 1843. For his long active services to the Lodge, he was made an Honorary Member, March 12, 1849.

He was Grand Scribe of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Massachusetts in 1834 and 1835; Grand King in 1836; and Grand High Priest in 1837, 1838, and 1839. After filling several important positions in the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, he was elected Grand Master of that Body in 1840, presiding during his term of office with marked ability and benefit to the Craft, in that oldest Masonic Jurisdiction in our country.

In Templar Masonry, he also filled the highest position, and presided a Grand Commander over the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

In 1851, Br. Robinson received the 33° from the Supreme Council Ancient Accepted Rite, at Boston, and became an active and zealous worker in that Grand Body. He was Grand Treasurer of the H. E. in 1859, and Lieut. Grand Commander under Ill. Br. Raymond in 1861, which office he held until 1865, when he became the P. Sovereign Grand Commander of the Supreme Council A. A. Rite for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the United States, the duties of which he discharged with credit to himself and satisfaction to his brethren, till his resignation of that office on the 16th day of May, 1867, being the last official position he held in the Masonic Society, in which he had devoted over thirty years, as an active member and zealous worker for the maintenance of its golden rules and cardinal principles.

During my late visit to South America, I had the pleasure of receiving his diploma of Honorary Membership from the Supreme Council, Grand Orient of Brazil, Valley of Lavridio, at Rio de Janeiro, and anticipated the pleasure of fulfilling the request of that Grand Body, by delivering the docunient to Br. Robinson in person ; but before that opportunity came, he had passed away, and the saored parchment now lies among the emblems of mourning upon his bier, (our altar,) a fitting memorial to remind us of the uncertainty of life, and the certainty of death ; and that we, too, may be stimulated to labor on in the hope of making our lives sublime,—

"And when departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sand of time."

For several months previous to his death, he devoted himself exclusively to the quiet, social, domestic family circle, receiving with a Christian resignation, during his declining health, the silent admonition of his approaching end, and with a self-consciousness of having performed his allotted task and pilgrimage on earth, he carefully arranged his worldly affairs, portioned out his masonic papers to old and devoted associates, and when the last hour came for yielding up the spirit to the God that gave it, he calmly and with great composure passed away to the realms of immortality. He died at his residence in Lexington, Massachusetts, on the 16th day of October last, surrounded by his family and intimate friends. His death and the hour for the funeral was duly communicated to the Fraternity in his immediate vicinity. On the 20th of October, the remains of Ill. Br. Robinson were quietly deposited in their lasting resting place at Mount Auburn Cemetery, and those Of our Fraternity who may hereafter visit that beautiful, romantic spot and silent, city of the dead, should for a moment turn aside from life's busy walks, and musing awhile amid the waving branches and rustling leaves that sing the mournful requiem of departed worth, pause and write in the heart's warm tribute to the memory of our lamented brother, giving a passing gaze on the green mound, where —

"Peaceful he sleeps with all our rites adorned,
Forever honored and forever mourned."


BIOGRAPHY

FROM PROCEEDINGS, 1916

Simon Wiggin Robinson drew his first breath among the granite hills of New Hampshire, being born at New Hampton in that State, on the nineteenth day of February, 1792. His father, Captain Noah Robinson, a native of the same State, was a staunch and loya1 citizen of the o1d school and did honorable service for his country during our revolutionary struggle.

At the age of twenty, Brother Robinson was also in the service of his country, and, as Adjutant was stationed at Portsmouth, N. H., during the war of 1812. At the close of the war he left the army and located in Boston, where he entered into active commercial business in which he continued until about 1845, when he retired with a moderate competency. He was twice happily married, and two sons, two daughters, and his widow, survived him.

Although one year a member of the Legislature of Massachusetts he never entered into the active political arena, or became a partisan of any of those varied and exciting events that often sweep like a whirlwind over the land. During his active career he studiously kept within bounds of all mankind, pursuing the even tenor of his way in all that constitutes a man, a citizen, and a Mason, maintaining throughout this long journey of life a spotless character and an honored name.

What higher tribute can the living bestow upon the dead?

In his social relations he ever preserved that even, frank, truthful, pleasant disposition, that won for him the sincere esteem and attachment of a large circle of friends, which continued in the most harmonious concord during his long earthly existence.

The Masonic record of Most Worshipful Brother Robinson, presents that same pure type of unblemished character that was so marked throughout his business and social life.

He was initiated in Mount Lebanon Lodge, Boston, on the twenty-ninth day of November, 1819, received the Fellowcraft Degree, the same date, and was raised to a Master Mason January 20, 1820, admitted a member February 28, same year, and was Worshipful Master of the Lodge for several years, serving also as Treasurer from 1828 to 1843. For his long, active services to the Lodge he was made an Honorary Member March 12, 1849. (District Deputy of the First District in 1835-1836.)

He was Grand Scribe of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Massachusetts in 1834 and 1835, Grand King in 1836, and Grand High Priest in 1837, 1838, and 1839. After filling several important positions in the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts he was elected. Grand Master of that Body in 1846, presiding during his term of office with marked ability and benefit to the Craft.

In Templar Masonry he also filled the highest positions and presided as Grand Commander over the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In 1851, Brother Robinson received the 33° from the Supreme Council, Ancient Accepted Rite, at Boston, and became an active and zealous worker in that Grand Body. He was Grand Treasurer in 1859, and Lieutenant Grand Commander under Illustrious Brother Raymond. in 1861, which office he held until 1865, when he became the Sovereign Grand Commander of one of the rival Supreme Councils, Ancient Accepted Rite, for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the United States, the duties of which he discharged with credit to himself and satisfaction to his brethren, till his resignation of that office on the sixteenth day of May, 1867, the time of the union of the two Supreme Councils, being the last official position he held in the Masonic Society, in which he had devoted over thirty years as an active member and zealous worker for the maintenance of its golden rules and cardinal principles.

For several months previous to his death he devoted himself exclusively to the quiet, social, domestic family circle, receiving with a Christian resignation, during his declining health, the silent admonition of his approaching end and with a self-consciousness of having performed his allotted task and pilgrimage on earth he carefully arranged his worldly affairs, portioned out his Masonic papers to old and devoted associates, and when the last hour came for yielding up the spirit to the God that gave it, he calmly and with great composure passed away to the realms of immortality. He died at his residence in Lexington, Massachusetts, on the sixteenth clay of October, 1868, and was buried at Mount Auburn Cemetery.

FROM MOORE'S FREEMASON'S MONTHLY, 1868

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXVIII, No. 1, November 1868, Page 21:

It is with deep regret that we have to announce the death of our venerable brother, R.W. Simon W. Robinson, at the advanced age of 76 years. He died at his residence in Lexington, in this State, on the 16th ult., and was buried on the following Tuesday. We have not the means at hand, at the present writing, for such a sketch of his personal and masonic history, as we hope hereafter to give. He was a Past Grand Master of the M.W. Grand Lodge of this Commonwealth, of which Body he had been, for more than a third of a century, an active member. He had also presided over Mt. Lebanon Lodge and St. Paul's Chapter of this city, Boston Encampment, and the Grand Chapter and Grand Encampment of the State; and was also very recently the presiding officer of the Supreme Council 33°, having its seat at New York. He was a zealous Mason, and performed whatever he thought to be his duty, in a conscientious manner. In all his business and social relations, he maintained a spotless character, and his memory will be long cherished with pleasant recollections, by his comparatively few remaining friends, who were most intimately associated with him, masonically and otherwise, in the more active period of his life.

Since the above was in type, we have received the following from an early friend of the deceased: —

In our last issue we paid our tribute to one of our honored and honorable brothers, Br. Thomas Power, Esq., and now we have to record the death of another beloved and highly esteemed companion and friend, Simon W. Robinson, Past Grand Master of Massachusetts, who passed from earth on the 16th instant, at the ripe age of seventy-six, in the fulness of years, and in the honors derived from an unspotted life.

Br. Robinson had not those attainments which distinguish the scholar, nor that cultivation which attend the accomplished gentleman, but he possessed that excellent gift of good practical common sense, which showed itself in every position he filled; and he filled many most acceptably. In all his transactions, he was ever found upright, honorable, and trusty, and his memory is without a blemish. He was endowed with a kind, social, and feeling heart, which secured to him a large circle of true friends.

He was a firm supporter of the masonic institution, equally in its darkest as in its brighter days, and sustained all the honors conferred on him by his brethren with credit to himself, and to the advancement of the Order.

He has gone to join the companionship of those of a past generation (now almost extinct), who made his early masonic life pleasant and happy; and we may surely trust that that fraternal connexion will but be continued in the Grand Lodge above.

SPEECHES

FEAST OF ST. JOHN, DECEMBER 1846

From Proceedings, V-126, December 1846, Address to the Grand Lodge:

In the providence of God we are again assembled within this consecrated Hall, dedicated and set apart to universal benevolence, to exchange tokens of fraternal regard, and to strengthen our solemn engagements with the ties of sincere affection. Few things could give a more heartfelt pleasure, and satisfaction than this meeting of friends and brethren, from different parts of the Commonwealth, uniting in the grand design of devising ways and means for the general prosperity and happiness of the fraternity. And I rejoice to meet so many of you, on this occasion in health and prosperity and sincerely hope that it may long be continued to you.

The past year has been one of unusual prosperity to the Fraternity, many brethren whose standing in society give strength and character to the Institution, have been added to our numbers. It has attained an elevated rank among the honored and useful Institutions of the land, and its privileges are sought with avidity by the virtuous and good in every condition of life. At no period since the introduction of Free Masonry into this country has it held a higher place in public estimation or have its prospects been more gratifying and encouraging than at the present moment. The maddening prejudice, and unshallowed excitement against the Institution, which but a few years since pervaded the community, disturbing the friendly relation of families and neighbors, and poisoning the fountains of social and domestic enjoyment, have passed away, and it is now every where regarded with favor and affection.

Most of the Lodges which were prostrated by the violence of the Anti-Masonic tornado which spread over our country with resistless sweep, now stand erect, and the brethren are engaged with commendable zeal and energy in repairing the desolation, in mending the breaches, and strengthening her ramparts of our beloved zion. In Vermont while all seemed lost and trampled in the dust, the enlivening sound of the gavel is again heard, and their Lodges seem instinct with vitality. In New Hampshire and Maine the Institutions are in the ascendant and give promise of continued prosperity.

These manifestations of divine goodness demand our warmest gratitude to the great and benevolent Author of our existence for his protecting care and preservation of our time honored Institution, and its restoration to health and activity. Since our last communication Mt, Tabor Lodge, at E. Boston, has been consecrated, and its officers installed in due and ancient form. This is a new Lodge and is composed of active, intelligent and zealous brethren who "show their faith by their works." Washington Lodge at Roxbury has awoke from its long slumbers, and has commenced labor with a remarkable prospect of a plentiful harvest. They have procured and fitted up at no inconsiderable expense, a New Hall for their accommodation and give satisfactory evidence of their devotion to the interests of the Institution and a determination to support its principles. Monitor Lodge at Waltham has been organized and although they are weak in number, they are strong in the faith, and being located in the midst of a moral and intelligent community, no doubt is entertained of their ultimate success.

Within a few weeks past I have had occasion to visit many of the Lodges under this jurisdiction, and have been highly gratified to witness the harmony, order and decorum, which every where prevails, and the desire of the brethren to perfect themselves in the lecture and work. The advantage of our Annual meetings for Instruction, cannot well be overrated, and is doing much to bring about a uniformity in the work, and lecture throughout our Commonwealth, I would now my brethren call your attention to a subject of some importance, which will require and I trust will receive your serious and candid attention.

It is probably known to most of you that a Convention has been proposed to be held in the city of Baltimore the ensuing September, for the purpose of instituting a General G. Lodge. The proposition has already met with favor in some of the G. Lodges and in others it is still under consideration. The subject has several times been presented to this G. Lodge, but generally under circumstances unfavorable to a full and dispassionate consideration of its merits. The present happy and quiet state of the fraternity seemed peculiarly adapted to its consideration and I doubt not it will receive that attention its importance demands. From the best information I have been able to obtain, I am led to believe that the Convention will be held, and a majority of the G. Lodges will be represented there — and that a Constitution will be framed and will be binding on such G. Lodges, and such only, as shall adopt it. It is then for you to determine whether under all the circumstances in the case, it would not be for the interest of this G. Lodge to be represented, and to assist in the framing of a Constitution, if one is to be framed. The subject is now placed before you, to make such disposition of it, as you in your wisdom, may think best, and I doubt not it will receive that careful consideration, for which this G, Lodge has ever been distinguished. I shall be most happy to cooperate with you, in any measures which you may deem advisable for the promotion of the great object of the Institution.

FEAST OF ST. JOHN, DECEMBER 1848

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. VIII, No. 4, February 1849, p. 98:

Brethren of the Grand Lodge—

Before I leave the station to which your partiality has thrice called me, I must be permitted to offer a few thoughts which have occurred to me, and which may not be altogether inappropriate to the present occasion.

In the first place, then, I would tender you my sincere and grateful acknowledgments for the confidence and respect you have uniformly manifested toward me. Thrice, consecutively, you have assigned me the highest place within your power to bestow— the office of Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of this Commonwealth; and the constant aid and liberal support you have rendered me in the performance of the duties of the Chair, will long be remembered with gratitude and thankfulness. Whatever of advantage has resulted to the Institution, during my administration, and I believe there has been much, must be placed to your credit, rather than my own; the most I can claim is to than it with you. The three years I have had the honor of presiding over your deliberations, have been distinguished for harmony and unanimity. No envyings or bitterness, no controversy or contention has been permitted to enter here, to poison the fountain of social enjoyment; to disturb the peace and harmony of our meetings, or to impair their usefulness. Upon most subjects which have engaged your attention during this period, there has been a wonderful degree of unanimity; and where a difference of opinion has existed, the minority has cheerfully acquiesced in the decisions of the majority.

It must be apparent, it seems to me, to the most careless and superficial observer, that the peace and welfare of the Institution has been your primary object; and to this end have all your labors been directed. In debate, although the utmost freedom has been indulged, yet in no single instance, within my recollection, have the rules of propriety and decorum been violated. Your language has uniformly been respectful and courteous. The opinions and feelings of each have been duly respected, and have received all that attention and consideration that could reasonably be claimed for them. Self-display, the desire of applause, or a wish to appear wiser than your Brethren, has held no place in your discussions. Your object has been a higher—a holier one—to present facts in a plain and practical way, and to assist each other in arriving at correct conclusions, has been your constant aim; in fact, circumstances authorize the belief, that in all your proceedings you have studiously avoided giving into any practice that might disturb the harmony of the Lodge, or that was inconsistent with the spirit and genius of the Order. The importance of harmony and unanimity in Masonry can not well be over estimated. They are the strength and support of the Institution; without which it will languish and decay. It is by harmony and unanimity that the Institution has attained its present elevated position and high rank among the honored and useful Institutions of the land; and they are vital to its prosperity and success as are food and air to the support of human existence.

I have dwelt longer upon this topic than may be thought necessary or profitable, but I find an apology in the importance of the subject; for nothing can be more interesting and important to us as Masons, than the prosperity of the Institution. At the present moment, the Institution is prosperous almost without a parallel, not only under this jurisdiction, but under other jurisdictions, and throughout the civilized world. All the dormant Lodges, with very few exceptions, in this Commonwealth, have been resuscitated, and a large number of new ones chartered, and it is believed they are all faithful, active, and in good condition. Men of intelligence, worth and influence are seeking the honors and privileges of our Institution, and devoting themselves to its interest with commendable zeal and earnestness. Large additions are yearly made to our numbers, and if we remain united and true to ourselves, the Institution will go on from prospering to prosper. But, Brethren, a season of great prosperity is not without its perils. In the ordinary pursuits of life success in business is not unfrequently the high road to ruin. So in Freemasonry, great prosperity is too often the prelude to a disordered and unhappy state of the Fraternity.

If I rightly interpret the signs of the times, there are already influences in operation, which, if not seasonably checked, will lead to consequences we may all have occasion to deplore. Combinations and parties should have no place in Freemasonry. Party feeling is the bane of tile Institution. Controversy and contention it cannot abide. Its empire is the heart; and whatever tends to alienate the affections, aims a blow at its very existence. There never was, and there never can be, rightfully, but one party in Freemasonry, and that, a truly Masonic party; a party devoted to the interest and welfare of the Institution—self-sacrificing, disinterested, and regarding the prosperity of the Craft paramount to all personal considerations. All other parties are inconsistent with the spirit and genius of the Order, and should be discountenanced by every friend of the Institution. And I pray you, Brethren, that you watch with the tenacity of life, and guard against the insidious approach of combinations, parties and party animosities, whether they originate in hostility to the Craft, excessive, unregulated zeal, or from any other cause; for nothing can be more fatal to the prosperity and well being of the Fraternity. It is a good thing to be zealous in a good cause, but all experience proves that there is a false zeal, an unhallowed fire, kindled and fed with the fierceness of evil passions, and which burns but to destroy. This false zeal is but the manifestation of party spirit, and is attended with all its evil consequences, or it originates in the love of distinction and power. Its unhappy results may be'seen in the pride, vanity and arrogance it engenders; in the acrimony and bitterness it breathes into the temper; in the uncharitable judgments, unqualified censure, and bitter invective it bestows, without stint or measure, upon all those who fail to meet its wishes, who dissent from its views, or oppose its designs. » The decisions of the Grand Lodge are the embodiment of the wishes and directions of the whole Fraternity of the Commonwealth; and when these have been solemnly decreed, it is the imperious duty of the officers to see them faith- folly and promptly executed—their oath of office demands this of them. And, my Brethren, permit me here to add, they have a right to expect the co-operation of every member of this body in the performance of these duties. If the decisions are wrong, productive of more evil than good, the remedy is with you, not with them.

To you, my Brethren, are entrusted the care and superintendence of the Fraternity, in this Commonwealth. It is an important (rust, involving no less consequences than the peace and prosperity of the Institution. And can one of us be insensible of the responsibility which rests upon us; or unmindful of our solemn obligations to be true and faithful to the trust reposed in us? Are we not bound by every consideration which honor, duty and gratitude can suggest, to use our best endeavors to promote the harmony and welfare of the Institution? And can we neglect these duties with impunity? Will not the recollection of it haunt us through life, and be to us an instrument of perpetual torture? In our moments of sober reflection, shall we not survey the past with unavailing regret; and will not the account we shall have to render at the tribunal of conscience be a fearful one, if we prove false to our trust? Let us then, my Brethren, be up and doing. Let us work while it is called to day, for the night cotneth in which no man can work. Let us improve the golden opportunities as they fly; and as faithful guardians of our sacred Institution, let us do all that in us lies, to preserve its harmony; maintain its dignity; defend it against the rude assaults of controversy and contention, and future generations will rise up and call ns blessed.

The officers whom yon have elected, and who are now about to be Installed, are all true and trusty, and deserving of your confidence. Their experience, Masonic intelligence and attachment to the Craft give assurance, that nothing will be wanting on their part to secure the highest interest—-the permanent good of the Institution. But Brethren you should bear in mind that however experienced and intelligent—however active and vigilant, and however devoted and faithful they may be, without your co-operation their efforts will avail comparatively nothing—they will be as impotent as water spilled upon the ground. Each and everyone of you has duties to perform, and to your consciences must account for the manner in which you perform them.

In conclusion, Brethren, permit me once more to tender you my hearty thanks, for the kindness and fraternal regard you have uniformly manifested toward me, and beg you to accept the only requital in my power to make—the homage of a grateful heart. And may heaven's blessings attend you through life—and at death may you meet a cordial welcome to the Grand Lodge above, where the Supreme Architect of the Universe presides.

NOTES

CHARTERS GRANTED

CHARTERS RESTORED

RULINGS



Grand Masters