Satucket

From MasonicGenealogy
Jump to: navigation, search

SATUCKET LODGE

Location: East Bridgewater

Chartered By: Samuel Crocker Lawrence

Charter Date: 03/08/1882 1882-24

Precedence Date: 04/06/1881

Current Status: in Grand Lodge vault


PAST MASTERS

  • Frederick S. Strong, 1881, 1882
  • Francis M. Kingman, 1883-1885
  • Charles E. Field, 1886, 1887
  • George Hunt, 1888, 1889
  • Herman L. Morse, 1890, 1891
  • Franklin W. French, 1892, 1893
  • Prescott L. Pratt, 1894
  • Frank L. Erskine, 1895, 1896
  • Charles F. Mann, 1897, 1898; Mem
  • Charles C. Bird, 1899
  • Charles W. Waterman, 1900, 1901
  • Samuel E. Keith, 1902, 1903
  • George M. Webber, 1904, 1905
  • Warren S. Shaw, 1906, 1907; SN
  • A. Richmond Parker, 1908, 1909
  • John Adam, 1910, 1911
  • Prescott Washburn, 1912, 1913
  • Edward N. West, 1914, 1915
  • Thomas Adam, 1916, 1917
  • Carl C. Poole, 1918, 1919
  • Benjamin E. Ward, 1920, 1921
  • L. Wallace Flagg, 1922, 1923
  • Carl A. Sturtevant, 1924, 1925
  • Walter MacKenzie, 1926, 1927
  • Herbert C. Healey, 1928, 1929
  • Lester R. Fisher, 1930, 1931
  • Lloyd E. Sturtevant, 1932, 1933
  • Forest W. Cousins, 1934, 1935
  • Ressie E. Bowser, 1936, 1937
  • Lawrence L. Wilson, 1938, 1939
  • Austin Washburn, 1940, 1941
  • Edward H. Turner, 1942; N
  • A. Clinton Smith, 1943, 1944
  • Arnold C. Swanson, 1945, 1946
  • Henry A. Fraser, 1947, 1948
  • Ralph H. Keith, 1949, 1950; N
  • Glen Churchill, 1951, 1952
  • N. Edward Lundberg 1953, 1954
  • Clayton Leach, 1955
  • L. Robert Fisher, 1956, 1957
  • Thomas R. Leach, 1958, 1959
  • A. Stanley Dewhurst, 1960, 1961
  • Robert E. Lundberg, 1962, 1963
  • Berj Kambegian, 1964, 1965
  • Hugh F. Hubbard, 1966, 1967
  • George H. Snow, III, 1968, 1969; N
  • Edward S. Whitmarsh, 1970, 1971
  • Bruce Robertson, 1972
  • Joseph A. Bulman, Jr., 1973, 1974
  • Leslie A. Skinner Jr., 1975, 1976, 1988, 1989
  • Kenneth S. Copeland 1977, 1978
  • Charles H. Brown, 1979, 1980
  • William L. Copeland, 1981, 1982
  • Douglas E. Wales, 1983
  • Walter T. Quigley, 1984, 1985
  • Robert H. Flood, 1986, 1987
  • Arthur H. Richardson, Jr. , 1990, 1991; PDDGM
  • John H. Daly, 1992, 1993
  • Francis E. Foster, Jr., 1994, 1995
  • M. Richard Wight 1996, 1997
  • Chandos L. Bailey, III, 1998, 1999, 2004, 2005; PDDGM
  • Robert A. Buotte, 2000, 1901
  • Shawn R. Berry, 2002, 1903
  • Stephen Foster, 2006
  • George E. Noon, 2007, 1910
  • Charles Francis, Jr., 2011, 1912
  • Shawn R. Berry, 2013

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Dispensation: 1881
  • Petition for Charter: 1882

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1931 (50th Anniversary)
  • 1956 (75th Anniversary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1883 1885 1888 1891 1911 1912 1916 1927 1949 1957 1966 1970 1972 1976 1980 1986 1989 1991 1996 2000 2009 2012

HISTORY

  • 1931 (50th Anniversary History, 1931-54; see below)
  • 1956 (75th Anniversary History, 1956-127; see below)

50TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, APRIL 1931

From Proceedings, Page 1931-54:

The old East Parish, afterwards the town of East Bridge-water, was the birthplace of organized Masonry in the Bridgewaters, and no history of Satucket Lodge would be complete without some reference to the organization of our Mother Lodge, Fellowship, which, later, established Itself permanently in the South Parish, now the town of Bridgewater.

In the year 1797 Fellowship Lodge was organized and its first meeting was held at' the home of Right Worshipful Hector Orr, an enthusiastic Mason who had received his Master Mason Degree while a student at Harvard College, from which institution he graduated in 1792.

At a meeting of Fellowship Lodge held during the first year of its existence it was voted to finish and furnish a room in Brother Orr's house as a Lodge-room, and he served as its first Worshipful Master. His home was the second house north of the Washburn Library and we find that meetings of the Lodge were held in East Bridge-water as late as 1826.

After Fellowship Lodge moved to Bridgewater it continued to be the home Lodge of East Bridgewater Masons until 1881. Transportation facilities at that time were poor as compared with those now available and, as the time appeared favorable for the establishment of a Lodge here, a Dispensation was granted under date of April 6, 1881, by Most Worshipful Samuel Crocker Lawrence, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, to forty-four Master Masons for the organization of a Lodge in East Bridgewater to be known as Satucket Lodge, and appointing Worshipful Brother Frederick S. Strong, Worshipful Master; Brother Francis M. Kingman, Senior Warden and Brother Joshua Dean, Junior Warden. The applicants to whom the Dispensation was granted were as follows : George Allen. George W. Allen, Charles W. Bennett, Charles Blockhous, Jarvis Burrell, Harvey Chandler, Barry Cole, Joshua Dean, Charles H. Edson, Frank L. Erskine, Wyman C. Fickett, Charles E. Field, Edward F. Field, Theodore Freeman, Leonard F. Gammons,
Charles II. Goss, Benjamin W. Harris, Charles W. Harris,
Fred Hobart, Henry Hobart, George L. Jones, William
 M. Judkins, Robert C. Keith, Simeon C. Keith, Francis
 M. Kingman, A. Harris Latham, E. Austin Latham, Fred G. Lovell, William Lincoln, Philip McBeth, Herman L.
Morse, James Nelson, Edmund W. Nutter, Samuel L.
Seaver, Leonard Selee, Charles W. Siddall, Frank Smith,
Frederick S. Strong, Benjamin Ward, John E. Water
man, George A. Wheeler, John M. Whiting, George A. 
Wright, and Robert Young.

Worshipful Brother Frederick S. Strong, the first Master of the Lodge, was a man of exceptionally fine character, beloved by all his associates. He was the General Manager of the Carver Cotton Gin Co. 's plant here.

The first meeting was held April 12, 1881, at which the Lodge was organized temporarily by Leonard F. Gammons, acting as Marshal, and the Dispensation was read. Worshipful Master Strong named the following appointive officers: Treasurer, Samuel L. Seaver; Secretary, Wyman C. Fickett; Chaplain, Rev. Wm. F. Farrington; Marshal, Leonard F. Gammons; Senior Deacon, George W. Allen; Junior Deacon, A. Harris Latham; Sentinel, George A. Wright; Tyler, James Nelson. Tt was voted to hold the regular monthly communications on the Tuesday on or before the full moon. A vote of thanks was extended to the lady friends of the Lodge for an appropriate and valuable gift, a copy of the Holy Bible, which has since been used whenever the Lodge has met. A petition for the degrees was received from Clarence A. Chandler. He was elected in due course and had the honor to be the first candidate to receive degrees in the Lodge. From this first application the Lodge has progressed conservatively until our membership now numbers one hundred and fifty-nine.

At a meeting February 28, 1882, the Lodge received a present of a silver square and pair of compasses from Brother John Burrell, of Fellowship Lodge, afterwards a member of Satucket Lodge.

Satucket Lodge was constituted May 1, 1882, in Sutton Hall, an apartment in the Masonic Temple which stood upon the site occupied by the present Temple on the corner of Tremont and Boylston Streets, Boston. Most Worshipful Samuel Crocker Lawrence, Grand Master, presided, there being a large attendance of the members of the Lodge.

The officers wore installed, the Worshipful Master by the Grand Master, the Senior Warden by the Senior Grand Warden, the Junior Warden by the Junior Grand Warden, and the remaining officers by the Right Worshipful Deputy Grand Master. An eloquent address was delivered by the Grand Master.

It is worthy of note that from the institution of the Lodge much attention has been given by the officers to the important matter of perfecting the ritual work. During the earliest years special communications were held almost weekly, solely for the purpose of these rehearsals, and the records show these to have been well attended by the officers and members. As a consequence of this fidelity to the Lodge a high proficiency in the work of the degrees was attained and this brought with it a strong fraternal spirit which has always prevailed.

During the first ten years the Lodge occupied quarters in the building erected by Brother Charles H. Goss. This was on a ten years' lease. Previous to the expiration of the lease a committee from the Lodge attempted to secure from the Trustees of the Goss Estate some slight improvements but, as no satisfactory arrangements could be made, several public spirited members succeeded in the purchase of a lot of land well situated in the centre of the town in order that a lot might be available at some future date for a building for Masonic purposes.

Early in 1892, it being impossible to secure any improvements in the previous quarters, arrangements were made to raise necessary capital for erection of the building. A building association was formed for this purpose and the present building was built, the lower floor being occupied for business purposes, the second floor for a hall, and the third, as well as a portion of the second, for Masonic purposes. The building was dedicated on October 22, 1892, a large number of members and visitors being present, probably a larger number than have been present at any gathering since. This was also an occasion of the annual visit of Right Worshipful Henry A. Belcher, District Deputy Grand Master for the then Twenty-Fourth Masonic District.

In 1918, again with the assistance of public spirited members of the Lodge who in many cases presented their shares in the building association, and in some cases by purchase from representatives of the estates of deceased members, or otherwise, the Lodge secured entire ownership of the building, subject to a moderate mortgage.

At the first meeting, as has been stated, the dates of the regular monthly communications were fixed as the Tuesday on or before the full moon, this being a custom adopted in order to suit the convenience of members who drove in from some distance and who preferred to drive by moonlight. In at least one instance this caused inconvenience. The November meeting was fixed as the Annual Meeting and in the month of November, 1884, there was no Tuesday on or before the full moon, which circumstance made it necessary to apply for a Dispensation to conduct the business of that year's Annual Meeting on the Tuesday before the December full moon. A few years ago this custom was abandoned and the regular communications are now held on the first Tuesday in each month.

During its earlier years the Lodge received much assistance in conducting its social affairs from an organization of ladies known as Satucket Guild and their meetings were held in the parlor, furnished by them, opening off the main Lodge-room. The furniture and piano were donated by the Guild to the Lodge at a later date.

In April, 1900, the Lodge was honored by an informal visit from Most Worshipful Charles T. Gallagher, Grand Master, who expressed his pleasure in the accuracy of the degree work of the evening.

In the spring of 1927 Most Worshipful Frank L. Simpson, Grand Master, paid us a visit accompanied by many officers of the Grand Lodge and presented Brother John Burrell a Veteran's Medal.

The Grand Lodge has honored us by appointing two members of Satucket Lodge as District Deputy Grand Masters, Right Worshipful Charles F. Mann, who served in 1900 and 1901, and Right Worshipful Warren S. Shaw, in 1919 and 1920. The various anniversary dates of the institution of the Lodge have been observed with appropriate ceremonies on each occasion. The tenth anniversary was celebrated by a concert and ball. The thirtieth anniversary was made a Charter members' night and it is interesting to note that, at this event, which occurred during the administration of Worshipful Brother Prescott Washburn, seven Charter members were present, whereas, on this, the fiftieth anniversary, we are honored by the presence of the only surviving Charter member, Worshipful Brother Charles E. Field.

When the steamship Titanic sank, after a collision with an iceberg, one of its best known passengers was an artist of international repute, Brother Francis Davis Millet, formerly a resident of this town, and whose ashes were brought here to be interred in the family lot. By request of his Lodge in New York Masonic services were held by Satucket Lodge in the Unitarian Church on May 3, 1912, and many of us will remember the solemnity of the occasion because of the nation-wide sorrow at the passing of many notable people in this marine disaster.

Nine Brethren of the Lodge served in the United States forces during the World War, Brothers Henry L. Adam, Francis V. Barstow, Mason E. Clarke, Wesley N. Churchill, Harold L. Johnson, Laurence E. Cote, Elbridge B. Curtis, Henry Hudson and Richard H. Dunphe. These Brethren were members of the Lodge during their service. Others have joined since the armistice so this is not a complete list of our service members.

For several years Sachem Rock Chapter, O. E. S., has met in our quarters and has extended valuable assistance to us on many occasions, notably in sharing with the Lodge the expense of installing a steam heating system in the building. The Star Club, an organization affiliated with them, has also assisted us.

These, Brethren, are but a few of the outstanding events in the history of Satucket Lodge. The same fine spirit of fraternity and personal friendship which animated the Charter members still exists in the Lodge. May another fiftieth anniversary find it undiminished.

75TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, APRIL 1956

From Proceedings, Page 1956-127:

By Wor. Forest W. Cousins, Bro. Richard W. Cooper, Bro. Hugh H. Hubbard.

The preparation of this history of Satucket Lodge has been a pleasant task, as well as an interesting experience, covering the seventy-five years from its institution April 6, 1881, to the present date. The work has been materially lessened because there has been available the very excellent history covering the first fifty years written by R.W. Warren S. Shaw on April 6, 1931, on the occasion celebrating the fiftieth anniversary, held in these same rooms. Much of the first portion of this present history is taken from that report, and in some instances, it is copied verbatim.

In its early history the Town of East Bridgewater was known as the old East Parish. Here was the birthplace of organized Freemasonry in all the Bridgewaters: namely, the four separate towns of East Bridgewater, West Bridgewater, Bridgewater, and North Bridgewater, now the City of Brockton.

No history of Satucket Lodge would be complete without some reference to Fellowship Lodge, our Mother Lodge, which at a later date was established in the South Parish, now the Town of Bridgewater. In the year 1797, Fellowship Lodge was organized and held its first meeting at the home of R. W. Hector Orr, an enthusiastic Mason, who had received his Masonic Degrees while a student at Harvard College, from which institution he graduated in 1792. The Charter of Fellowship Lodge is signed by Paul Revere as Grand Master. At a meeting of Fellowship Lodge held during the first year of its existence it was voted to finish and furnish a room in Bro. Orr's house as a lodge-room, and he served as its first Worshipful Master. His home was the second house north of the Washburn Library, and records show that meetings were held in East Bridgewater as late as 1826.

After Fellowship Lodge moved to Bridgewater, it continued to be the home Lodge of East Bridgewater Masons until 1881. Transportation facilities at that time, limited to horse and buggy, between the two towns were poor compared to those now available, and since a number of actively interested Masons were affected, the time seemed favorable for the establishment of a Lodge in East Bridgewater in order that the Masons in this locality could the better promote the interests and prosperity of Masonry in general, and have a more convenient meeting place in which to enjoy the pleasures of fraternal gatherings.

Under date of April 6, 1881, a dispensation was granted by M.W. Samuel Crocker Lawrence, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, to forty-four Master Masons (Grand Lodge Proceedings of 1881 say forty-two), for the organization of a Lodge in East Bridgewater to be known as Satucket Lodge, and Bros. Frederick S. Strong, Francis M. Kingman and Joshua Dean were appointed Master, Senior Warden and Junior Warden respectively. The applicants to whom the dispensation was granted were as follows:

  • Allen, George Keith
  • Allen, George Watson
  • Bennett, Charles Warren
  • Blockhouse, Charles
  • Burrell, Jarvis
  • Chandler, Harvey
  • Cole, Harry
  • Dean, Joshua
  • Edson, Charles H.
  • Erskine, Frank Leland
  • Fickett, Wyman Collins
  • Field, Charles Elmer
  • Field, Edward Frank
  • Freeman, Theodore
  • Gammons, Leonard Franklin
  • Goss, Charles Henry
  • Harris, Benjamin Winslow
  • Harris, Charles Wescott
  • Hobart, Fred
  • Hobart, Henry
  • Jones, George Leavitt
  • Judkins, William Munroe
  • Keith, Robert Curtis
  • Keith, Simeon Curtis
  • Kingman, Francis Marion
  • Latham, Azor Harris
  • Latham, Eliab Austin
  • Lincoln, William
  • Lovell, Fred G.
  • McBeth, Philip
  • Morse, Herman Ladd
  • Nelson, James
  • Nutter, Edmund Winslow
  • Seaver, Samuel Leonard
  • Selee, Leonard
  • Siddall, Charles William
  • Smith, Frank
  • Strong, Frederick Simpson
  • Ward, Benjamin
  • Waterman, John Eliot
  • Wheeler, George Austin
  • Whiting, John W.
  • Wright, George Allen
  • Young, Robert

Here is surely a group of stalwart Masons, substantial citizens and worthy leaders, comprising in fact a full representation of men from nearly every walk of useful life in the community. Among them were numbered business men, merchants, lawyers, doctors, laborers, farmers, jeweler, shoe manufacturers, judge of probate court, congressmen, schoolteacher, barber, sailor, miner, machinists, printer, druggist, blacksmith, postmaster, and numerous others.

The first meeting was held April 12, 1881, at which the Lodge was organized temporarily by Bro. Leonard F. Gammons acting as Marshal and the dispensation was read. Worshipful Master Strong named the following appointive officers:

  • Samuel L. Seaver, Treasurer
  • Wyman C. Fickett, Secretary
  • Rev. Wm. F. Farrington, Chaplain
  • Leonard F. Gammons, Marshal
  • George W. Allen, Senior Deacon
  • A. Harris Latham, Junior Deacon
  • George A. Wright, Sentinel
  • James Nelson, Tyler

It was voted to hold regular monthly meetings on the Tuesday on or before the full moon. A vote of thanks was extended to lady friends of the Lodge for the very appropriate and valuable gift of a copy of the Holy Bible, which was used whenever the Lodge met until it was replaced in December 1953. A petition for the degrees was received from Clarence A. Chandler; he was elected in due course, and had the honor to be the first candidate to receive the degrees in the Lodge. From this application the Lodge has progressed conservatively until our membership today is 173, although Satucket Lodge as well as other Lodges experienced a temporary loss in membership during the depression years of the 1930's. At the fiftieth anniversary in 1931 the membership was 159, with the year 1945 showing the low point of 112 members. Our membership today shows that a satisfactory recovery in membership has been made, and prospects at the present time indicate that continued progress in membership will be experienced.

At the meeting held February 28, 1882, the Lodge received a present of a silver square and pair of compasses from Bro. John Burrell of Fellowship Lodge, afterwards a member of Satucket Lodge. Tonight, as at every meeting since that date, they have been placed upon the Great Light in Masonry on the Altar.

At the quarterly communication of Grand Lodge March 8, 1882, a petition signed by Wor. Frederick S. Strong and thirty-eight other Master Masons for a Charter for Satucket Lodge was received. As a result of this petition, Satucket Lodge was constituted May 1, 1882, in Sutton Hall, an apartment in the Masonic Temple which stood upon the site occupied by the present Temple on the corner of Tremont and Boylston Streets, Boston. Most Worshipful Samuel Crocker Lawrence, Grand Master, presided, there being a large attendance of the members of the Lodge. The Worshipful Master was installed by the Grand Master, the Senior Warden by the Senior Grand Warden, the Junior Warden by the Junior Grand Warden, and the remaining officers by the R.W. Deputy Grand Master. The organization of Satucket Lodge was as follows:

  • Frederick S. Strong, Worshipful Master
  • Francis N. Kingman, Senior Warden
  • Joshua Dean, Junior Warden
  • Samuel L. Seaver, Treasurer
  • Wyman C. Fickett, Secretary
  • Rev. Wm. F. Farrington, Chaplain
  • Leonard F. Gammons, Marshal
  • George W. Allen, Senior Deacon
  • Azor H. Latham, Junior Deacon
  • George A. Wheeler, Senior Steward
  • Philip McBeth, Junior Steward
  • George A. Wright, Inside Sentinel
  • James Nelson, Tyler

After the customary proclamation by the Grand Marshal, the Grand Master delivered an inspiring and eloquent address.

The following names are inscribed upon the Charter of Satucket Lodge:

  • Allen, George
  • Allen, George Watson
  • Bennett, Charles Warren
  • Blockhouse, Charles
  • Burrell, Jarvis
  • Cole, Harry
  • Dean, Joshua
  • Erskine, Frank Leland
  • Fickett, Wyman Collins
  • Field, Charles Elmer
  • Field, Edward Frank
  • Freeman, Theodore
  • Gammons, Leonard Franklin
  • Goss, Charles Henry
  • Harris, Benjamin Winslow
  • Harris, Charles Wescott
  • Hobart, James Frederic
  • Hobart, Henry
  • Jones, George Leavitt
  • Judkins, William Munroe
  • Keith, Robert Curtis
  • Keith, Simeon Curtis
  • Kingman, Francis Marion
  • Latham, Azor Harris
  • Latham, Eliab Austin
  • McBeth, Philip
  • Morse, Herman Ladd
  • Nelson, James
  • Nutter, Edmund Winslow
  • Seaver, Samuel Leonard
  • Selee, Leonard
  • Siddell, Charles William
  • Smith, Frank
  • Strong, Frederick Simpson
  • Ward, Benjamin
  • Waterman, John Eliot
  • Wheeler, George Austin
  • Wright, George Allen
  • Young, Robert

It is worthy of note that from the institution of the Lodge much attention has been given by the officers to the important matter of striving to perfect the ritual work. During the earliest years special meetings were held almost weekly solely for the purpose of these rehearsals, and the records show these meetings to have been well attended by officers and members. In those days it is to be remembered that there was no official cipher to rehearse by, and the memorizing of ritual was largely a matter of word of mouth. As a consequence of this fidelity to the Lodge, a high proficiency in the work of the several degrees was attained, and this brought with it a strong fraternal spirit which has always prevailed in Satucket Lodge.

During the first ten years the Lodge occupied quarters in the building erected by Bro. Charles H. Goss. This building is on the southerly side of Central Street, just west of the railroad tracks, and is known to most of us as the Ryder Grain Company building. Meetings were held on the second floor, and the early records indicate that there were few facilities, and the furnishings of the lodge-room were those of the barest essentials at first. The dining hall was on the third floor "under the eaves." Yet it was not unusual on important occasions to have one hundred fifty or more visitors in those early days. These quarters were on a ten-year lease, at a yearly rental of $150.00. Previous to the expiration of the lease, a committee from the Lodge attempted to obtain improvements in the quarters from the trustees of the Goss estate, but as it appeared that the trustees were unwilling to do anything about improving the quarters, several of the enthusiastic and influential members succeeded in the purchase of the lot of land on which this building now stands. Finally, early in 1892, being unable to come to any sort of satisfactory understanding with the trustees of the Goss estate, arrangements were made to raise the necessary capital for the erection of a building. A building association was formed for this purpose, and the present building was erected, the lower floor being occupied for business purposes even as it is today, the second floor for a hall, and the third, as well as a portion of the second, for Masonic purposes. At the meeting on July 5, 1892, the Treasurer was authorized to borrow $800.00 for the purpose of furnishing and decorating the new lodgeroom. The building was dedicated October 22, 1892, with a large number of visitors present, probably a larger number than have been present at any gathering since. This was also the occasion of the annual visit of R. W. Henry A. Belcher, D. D. G. M. for the Twenty-Fourth Masonic District.

In 1918, again with the assistance of enthusiastic and influential members of the Lodge, who in many cases presented their own shares in the building association, or otherwise, the Lodge secured the entire ownership of the building, subject to a moderate mortgage of $3400.00. The vote of the Lodge authorizing the securing sole ownership of the building stipulated that the Lodge would pay $8000.00 provided that at least $4500.00 in cash was available through funds of the Lodge raised by subscription or otherwise, with no more than $3500.00 being in a first mortgage.

At the first meeting in 1881, as has been stated, the dates of the regular monthly meetings were fixed as the Tuesday on or before the full moon, this being adopted in order to suit the convenience of members who drove some distance to meetings by horse and buggy, and who preferred to drive by moonlight. The month of November was fixed as the annual meeting. In the month of November 1887, since there was no Tuesday on or before the full moon, it was necessary to apply for a dispensation to conduct business of that year's annual meeting on the Tuesday before the December full moon. On January 18, 1916, the bylaws were changed so that regular meetings were held on the second Tuesday of each month, which was later changed to the first Tuesday in the month, which is our meeting night now.

During its earlier years the Lodge received considerable assistance in conducting its social affairs from an organization of ladies known as the Satucket Guild, and their meetings, by vote of the Lodge, were held in the parlor, furnished by them, opening off the main lodge-room. The furniture, piano, and dishes for the dining room were donated by the Guild to the Lodge at a later date. It is interesting to note that by vote of the Lodge the Guild was authorized to use the Tyler's room during cold weather. In those days the rooms were heated by stoves, and it was considerable work to carry coal or wood from the basement to the third floor.

In April 1900 the Lodge was honored by an informal visit by M. W. Charles T. Gallagher, Grand Master, who expressed his pleasure in the accuracy of the degree work of the evening.

In the spring of 1927, M. W. Frank L. Simpson, Grand Master, paid us a visit, accompanied by many of the Grand Lodge Officers and presented Bro. John Burrell a Veteran's Medal.

The Grand Lodge has honored Satucket Lodge by appointing four members as District Deputy Grand Masters: R. W. Charles F. Mann, who served in 1900 and 1901; R. W. Warren S. Shaw in 1919 and 1920; R. W. Edward H. Turner in 1945 and 1946; and R. W. Ralph H. Keith in 1951 and 1952.

When the steamship Titanic sank after a collision with an iceberg, one of its better known passengers was an artist of international repute, Bro. Francis David Millett, formerly a resident of this town, whose ashes were brought here to be interred in the family lot. By request of his Lodge in New York, Masonic services were held in the Unitarian Church on May 3, 1912, with great solemnity because of the nation-wide sorrow at the passing of so many notable people in this marine disaster.

Brethren of our Lodge have served faithfully in the armed forces of our country in all the conflicts since its institution in 1881; some have served while they were members, and a considerable number of our present membership have seen service in one or more of the recent wars. Close contact has always been maintained by the Lodge with its members while in service.

On June 13, 1922, it was voted to permit Sachem Rock Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, to occupy the Lodge quarters at a yearly rental of $125.00, they to furnish their own janitor service, light and heat. At the same meeting it was also voted to install a steam-heating system at a cost of approximately $1000.00, and Sachem Rock Chapter, O.E.S., agreed to pay half the cost. They have met in our quarters since that date, and have been of valuable assistance to the Lodge on many occasions. The Star Club, an organization associated with the Eastern Star, has also been of assistance.

The various anniversary dates of the institution of the Lodge have been observed with appropriate ceremonies on each occasion. The tenth anniversary was celebrated by a concert and ball. The thirtieth anniversary was made a Charter Member night, and it is of interest to note that at this event, which occurred during the administration of Wor. Prescott Washburn, seven charter members were present. At the fiftieth anniversary, which occurred during the administration of Wor. Lester R. Fisher, father of our present Master, there was only one surviving Charter Member present, Wor. Charles E. Field, who passed away in 1935. Present at this anniversary also was our first candidate, Bro. Clarence A. Chandler, who has since passed away. On our fiftieth anniversary we were honored by the presence of M. W. Herbert W. Dean, accompanied by a large suite of Grand Officers. Previous to the ceremonies a banquet was served in the banquet hall. The ceremonies consisted of a roll-call to which eighty-five per cent of the members responded either in person or by letter or other message, a history of the Lodge by R. W. Warren S. Shaw, and inspiring addresses by the Grand Master and Rev. Bro. J. Whitcomb Brougher.

During the last ten years the Lodge has been particularly fortunate in having an extremely enthusiastic and capable group of younger Masons who have worked with commendable zeal and interest to improve the physical condition of the building, its furnishings and its decorations. For this purpose an organization known as the "Satucket Cane Club" was formed in January 1954. The initial meeting was held immediately following the attendance of the Brethren at the funeral home observance for our departed Brother Donald S. White, who during his short but full lifetime was keenly interested in promoting Masonic principles and ideals. The words that best describe the purpose of the club are "fun and fund." They took as a major project the raising of money for the purchase of an electric organ. One of the methods used was a public auction held in June 1954. The proceeds of this auction were put with the amount that had already been obtained through subscriptions. The remaining amount needed was unselfishly donated anonymously by a Lodge and club member. The organ was purchased and was dedicated in December 1954, with an appropriate ceremony of unveiling the plaque which had been placed upon its side, bearing the inscription to the memory of our late Bro. Donald S. White, who was prime mover in the work of raising the funds for its purchase. The plaque was unveiled by his widow.

Many of our members have furthered their Masonic activities by becoming members of the several York Rite bodies of Masonry, as well as the Scottish Rite. From our membership there have been ten Past High Priests of Harmony Royal Arch Chapter of Bridgewater, and our junior Past Master but one, is the present High Priest; one of our Past Members is a Past Illustrious Master of Abington Council of Royal and Select Masters, and seven of our Past Masters have been Commanders of Old Colony Commandery, Knights Templar, of Abington. Our first Worshipful Master, Bro. Frederick S. Strong, was serving Old Colony Commandery as Commander from 1881 to 1883, two of the same years he was presiding Master of Satucket Lodge.

Our present Master, Worshipful L. Robert Fisher, is the fortieth Master of Satucket Lodge. This is the second time that a son of a Past Master of this Lodge has presided as Worshipful Master, he being the son of Wor. Lester R. Fisher, as has been previously stated. The other instance was when Wor. Thomas Adam presided in 1916 and 1917, he being the son of Wor. John Adam, who served in 1910 and 1911. Four of our Past Masters have served one year; all others have served two years.

The records reveal that men of prominence and importance in the life of the community have been members of Satucket Lodge. It seems fitting and proper to mention but a few, realizing that there are many others who have also labored steadfastly and faithfully in upholding the good name of Freemasonry.

  1. Wor. Bro. Frederick S. Strong, a Charter Member, the first Master of Satucket Lodge, of which he may indeed be said to have been the founder, was esteemed by his Brethren for those sterling qualities of mind and heart which distinguished him. Uniformly courteous, thoughtful and kindly, sympathetic of the feelings of others, judicious and friendly in all his dealings, he endeared himself to all with whom he came in contact. In the early days of Satucket Lodge he gave unsparingly of his time, his interest, and his purse.
  2. Bro. Benjamin W. Harris, a Charter Member, though never holding office in the Lodge, was able on many occasions to render important service to his Brethren in Freemasonry. He was a graduate of Harvard Law School and successively was teacher of children in his home town, East Bridgewater, Lawyer, Town Clerk, member of Massachusetts House of Representatives, State Senator and District Attorney. In 1866 he was appointed Collector of Internal Revenue, and from 1872 to 1882 he served in Congress in the House of Representatives and during that time as Chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs rendered distinguished service to the nation as a whole, for as a result of his foresight and insistent advice is largely due the present greatness of the American Navy. In March of 1883 he was tendered a reception in East Bridgewater Town Hall, attended by a large number of men of national prominence.
  3. Bro. George W. Allen, a Charter Member, was in boyhood a farmer, later a gold prospector in the Pikes Peak Gold Rush in which he was unsuccessful, suffering hardship and privation. A Civil War veteran, wounded and crippled, lastly a shoe worker, a man of strong conviction and high integrity, he served Satucket Lodge faithfully.
  4. Wor. Bro. Herman L. Morse, a Charter Member, a machinist by trade. During the Civil War while he was superintending the erection of engines and boilers for a blast furnace in Birmingham , Alabama, the building was destroyed by Union forces and he was forced to walk most of the way to the Mason-Dixon line under cover of darkness. He finally reached East Bridgewater after suffering much privation and even hunger. As a result of this experience, he never turned away hungry any one who came to his door. He was the fifth Worshipful Master of the Lodge.
  5. R. W. Bro. Charles F. Mann received his degrees in Satucket Lodge in 1890 and was its Worshipful Master in 1897 and 1898, and was D.D.G.M. in 1900 and 1901. He was a member of all the York Rite Bodies as well as a member of the Scottish Rite. During his long and distinguished Masonic career, he was always keenly interested in the welfare of Satucket Lodge, particularly in its financial aspects. He was an active and aggressive worker in the early program of erecting this present building and was one of the prime movers in purchasing the building and acquiring title from the Masonic Building Association. He contributed considerable money in the purchase of outstanding shares, and even donated his own personal shares. He always stood ready, eager and willing to further the interests and welfare of Masonry in general, and Satucket Lodge in particular. R.W. Bro. Mann died June 9, 1941, and in his will he gave to Satucket Lodge $5,250 with which to pay the mortgage of $4750, and $500 to pay a small outstanding note. Thus his generosity made it possible for this Masonic building to be free and clear of debt. The mortgage was burned with appropriate ceremonies on June 2, 1942. R. W. Bro. Mann was a man of the highest personal honor and integrity. His "word was as good as his bond."

The several Brethren just mentioned have been called to the Celestial Lodge above; and, while they no longer meet with us, their memory shall ever remind us of their endeavors in behalf of Satucket Lodge.

For a very brief moment it appears only right and appropriate that a tribute of "Roses to the Living" to two of our present members should be tendered.

  1. Bro. Charles Cole is the oldest living member of Satucket Lodge. He is oldest in point of years, being born in England on July 14, 1860, now 96 years of age. His physical condition made it seem inadvisable for him to attempt to be present tonight. He received his Master Mason degree on December 9, 1890, and thus is our oldest Brother in point of membership. He has always given freely of his time and effort and energy to the Lodge and, though filling many of the minor offices, even through Junior Warden, declined to advance to the head of the Lodge. For many years he served as Trustee of the building. Failing health has made it necessary for him to be absent from our meetings for the past several years. He is missed deeply by those with whom he was associated in the Lodge. He is a man and Brother of the highest honor and integrity.
  2. Wor. Bro. Charles W. Waterman, our senior Past Master, was Wor. Master in 1900 and 1901. He was born March 18, 1870, and is now 86 years of age. He received his degrees in Satucket Lodge in 1892, being made a Master Mason on May 31, 1892. He is a member of the York Rite bodies and is a Past Commander of Old Colony Commandery, No. 15, of Abington. Following his terms as Worshipful Master, the records indicate that over the years he has continually served the Lodge in many elected and appointed offices, particularly as Secretary and as Treasurer. For many years he was one of the Trustees of the building.


He has been, all through his membership, a constant attendant at meetings, ready and willing to fill in in any office when called upon to do so. Masters through the years have relied upon his advice and judgment in affairs concerning the Lodge. For many years, at least thirty-five, and the records do not seem to reveal the exact number, he has delivered the charge to the candidates at the conclusion of the Third Degree. The dignified, earnest and sincere manner in which he delivered the charge cannot but have a deep and lasting impression upon the candidate. There can be no doubt of his profound and enduring devotion to our Lodge. May many years hence find him in our midst, delivering the charge in his own characteristic manner.

Thus we bring to a close the record of some of the outstanding and important events in the seventy-five years oi the life of Satucket Lodge. Here, we may well find the inspiration, and the challenge for each of us to exemplify in our daily life, and in our work, better far than by words alone our adherence to those truly Masonic virtues, Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth, and in so doing we shall keep the faith with those who have gone before. May Satucket Lodge continue to grow and prosper through all the years to come.

OTHER

  • 1982 (Petition to remove to East Bridgewater, 1982-36)

GRAND LODGE OFFICERS


DISTRICTS

1881: District 19 (Taunton)

1883: District 24 (Brockton)

1911: District 29 (Brockton)

1927: District 29 (Brockton)

2003: District 17


LINKS

Massachusetts Lodges