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JOSHUA FLINT 1801-1864

JoshuaFlint1915.jpg

Grand Master, 1835-1837


TERM

1835 1836 1837

NOTES

BIOGRAPHY

PROCEEDINGS, 1916

Joshua B. Flint was born in Cohasset, Mass., and died March 19, 1864. He was the son of Rev. Jacob (James) Flint, a true gentleman of the old school, and much beloved by his people. He was the clergyman of Cohasset previous to the time when the town was divided into parishes. Professor Flint was fitted for Harvard University at home, and graduated with honor in 1820. Soon after leaving the university, he became the assistant master of the English classical school in Boston, in which service he remained two years. At the end of that time he commenced the study of medicine as private pupil of Dr. John C. Warren, matriculating as a student in the medical department of Harvard University. He received the degree of Doctor of Medicine after completing the usual term of pupilage, and was immediately selected as a candidate for practice in Boston, where he resided until 1837.

During that year he received an invitation from the managers of the Louisville Medical Institute, then just going into operation, to occupy the chair of surgery in its first Faculty. He accepted the proposal, removed to Louisville, and remained there in the practice of his profession during the rest of his life. At the end of three, years, he resigned his chair in the Institute and a few years afterwards accepted the professorship of surgery in the Kentucky School of Medicine, at its commencement as a department of the Masonic College at Lagrange.

While in Boston he was for a number of years physician of the County penitentiary institution, and was appointed one of the medical commission to visit New York in 1832 for the purpose of making observations in the then novel pestilence - cholera. In 1827 or 1828, he established a course of popular lectures on anatomy, the first it is believed in the country, or even in the world, where that science was taught publicly and to miscellaneous classes illustrated by actual dissections.

At the times when an effort was to be made in the legislature of Massachusetts to legalize the study of anatomy he was elected as a representative from Boston with a special view to the services which a medical gentleman interested on that subject and well informed respecting it might render in its behalf. He was on the committee that proposed a report and submitted a project of law which led to the first legistative action promotive of human dissection, or the dissection of human bodies, which, probably, ever took place. He was continued in the legislature three years. He was, also, several times elected to the Common Council of Boston from the fourth ward, where he resided.

He was an ardent and influential member of the Masonic Fraternity and filled many places of trust and honor with credit to himself and with usefulness to those whom he served. He was made a Mason in Columbian Lodge, in this city, November 20, 1822, admitted a member March 6, 1823, and an honorary member in 1840. He served as Marshal in 1824; as Senior Deacon in 1825 and 1826; as Junior Warden in 1827; and as Master in 1828, 1830, 1831, 1832, and 1833. The latter office he resigned, October 20, 1828 on account of leaving the country; and again, October 3, 1833, probably because he had been appointed District Deputy Grand Master. He was the District Deputy Grand Master of the First District, in 1833, 1834, and 1835; and Grand Master in 1836 and 1837. The highest degree taken by him in Masonry is that of Master Mason. He delivered several Masonic addresses at the request of Brethren; one at the centennial celebration of St. John's Lodge, one for St. John's day, at Concord, and several before Columbian Lodge.

Page 1883-274; presentation of portrait.

PRESENTATION OF PORTRAITS OF PAST GRAND MASTERS.

W. Walter M. Cameron, Master of Columbian Lodge, of Boston, communicated a vote of that Lodge, presenting to the Grand Lodge the portraits of Past Grand Masters Joshua B. Flint and William D. Coolidge. Upon motion of R.W. Charles A. Welch, it was voted that these portraits be accepted and the thanks of the Grand Lodge be returned to Columbian Lodge for its most valuable gift.

In connection with this presentation, W. Brother Cameron submitted the following letter from W. Brother Wm. T. R. Marvin, containing an interesting sketch of the life of Past Grand Master Flint : —

BOSTON, December 12, 1883.
MR. WALTER M. CAMERON:

DEAR SIR AND WORSHIPFUL BROTHER, At a regular Communication of Columbian Lodge held on Thursday evening, December 6, it was unanimously voted, That the Worshipful Master be authorized to present to the Grand Lodge the portraits of R.W. Bro. Wm. D. Coolidge and R.W. Bro. Joshua B. Flint, now hanging on the walls of Sutton Hall.

It gives me personally great pleasure to communicate this vote, for two reasons: first, because both of these portraits were painted by order of Columbian Lodge during the time that I had the honor of filling the position you now occupy; and, secondly, because, having been honored by the Grand Lodge with the chairmanship of a committee specially appointed to obtain portraits of our Past Grand Masters, it is very gratifying to me to have my own Lodge give such valuable aid in carrying out this plan, and thus do its share towards restoring to its former completeness that gallery of portraits so unfortunately destroyed by the burning of our old Temple. R.W. Bro. Coolidge is now the oldest living Past Grand Master, and his services to Masonry ha\e long been known and appreciated by the Fraternity; long may it be before we must particularize them.

R.W. Bro. Joshua B. Flint was a native of Cohasset. He was made a Mason in Columbian Lodge, November 20, 1822, and served it as Marshal, Senior Deacon, Junior Warden, and Master. occupying the Oriental chair for five years, — in 1828, '30, '31, '32, and '33, resigning in the latter year to become District Deputy Grand Master of the First District, to which position he was appointed fifty years ago to-day, and which he filled most acceptably for three years, becoming Grand Master in February, 1835, and serving'in that capacity until September 1837.

This honor was conferred upon him at an earlier age, both as a Mason and a man, than on any one before, or, I believe, since. In writing to our late R.W. Bro. Heard, Bro. Flint said, in reference to it : —

"That office, at all times an eminently honorable and dignified one, was esteemed by me peculiarly honorable to myself, in view of the circumstances and considerations which determined my selection. The Institution was in the midst of a bitter persecution. Many of those who had been intrusted with responsible offices had been seduced by the allurements of political ambition, and betrayed the interests that had been committed to them by a confiding Fraternity, under assurances and engagements to fidelity which only the baseness of desperate villany could disregard. 'We must refrain fiom our usual practice of devoting to the Grand Mastership some Brother whose distinction in public life blends itself becomingly and favorably with the highest Masonic dignity,' said the Brethren. 'We can't trust such candidates for political promotion,— we must find a man who has no such temptation, and on whose fidelity we can rely.' Herein was the special honor of the office as it was conferred upon me.

"'He will not betray us,' said that vote of the Brethren of the Grand Lodge, who had known me well, — a vote by which I was placed in the most responsible and dignified Masonic position in the Commonwealth. This assurance of then confidence was better than the office, and has been felt by me to be so ever since. . . .

"During a large part of my Masonic experience in Boston, the Institution was passing thiough the ordeal of a relentless persecution. ' It tried the spirits.' It showed that many weak, and some wicked persons had unfortunately found admission to an Institution where the one class is almost as much out of place as the other. The former were too easily frightened or coaxed into a renunciation of their Masonic vows; — the latter took their 'thirty pieces of silver,' gave the treacherous kiss, and imitated their great prototype in all but the contrition, which was his only redeeming trait. But it showed also that there were good men and true, worthy disciples of that ancient Masonic martyr whom they had all once personified.

"With an intelligent appreciation of their rights as citizens, and a lively sense of their Masonic obligations, these men were unmoved alike by legislative dictation, the denunciations of the press, the counsel of time-serving friends, and by every other form of action which the impertinent rascality of anti-Masonry assumed. They were 'true as steel,' those Masons of Boston and Massachusetts who breasted that storm, and defied those who raised and ruled it. I shall always honor and love them, and be proud in the recollection of having been even one of the least of so resolute and faithful a band."

Rt. Wor. Bro. Flint was distinguished for his medical and surgical skill, having received his degree in 1825 fiom Harvard College, where he graduated in 1820.

He was Professor of Surgery at Louisville Medical Institute, and afterwards in the Kentucky School of Medicine, which was for a time connected with the Masonic College at La Grange. He is believed to have been the first in this country, if not in the world, to establish a course of popular lectures on anatomy, where that science was taught publicly and to miscellaneous classes. He filled various offices in the State and city government, as well as many honorable appointments in connection with his profession.

Rt. Wor. Bro. Flint died in 1864. He was beloved as a physician, skilful as a surgeon, a faithful friend, and an earnest and devoted Mason.

The portiaits were both painted by the well-known artist Billings. Of the fidelity of the likeness of Bro. Coolidge the Brethren are well able to judge, although, since it has taken, Time has been standing behind him, with his hands enfolded in his hair.

That of Bro. Flint was painted fiom a small carte de visite, which was the only available likeness the Lodge could obtain; but it has been highly praised for its fidelity, both by his early friends and members of his family.

Fraternally yours,
W. T. R. MARVIN,
Secretary Columbian Lodge.

(See also Historical account of Columbian Lodge page 513.)

NEW ENGLAND CRAFTSMAN, JANUARY 1917

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XII, No. 4, January 1917, Page 119:

Born Cohasset, Mass., October 13, 1801. Died April 18, 1864 — 63 years. Received the degrees in Columbian Lodge and became a member March 6, 1823. Made an Honorary Member in 1840. Was Worshipful Master of Columbian Lodge in 1828, 1830, 1831, 1832, and 1833. In October 1828 he resigned as Worshipful Master as he was leaving the country. He again resigned in October of 1833 having been appointed District Deputy Grand Master. He was Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts in 1836 and 1837. He was publicly installed in the first Masonic Temple on January 16, 1837, both ladies and gentlemen being present. This is said to be the only instance of a public installation in Grand Lodge. Dr. Flint was a member of the Harvard Class of 1820, later attending the Medical School. He removed to Louisville, Ky., and accepted the Chair of Surgery in a medical college there.

Dr. Flint in a letter says: "My early and intimate connexion with Masonry and Masons, in Boston, has supplied me with some the most agreeable reminiscences of my life, as well as with some of the most precious friendships which I still enjoy Especially is this remark true with respect to Columbian Lodge, within whose hallowed precincts that connexion was formed, and whose partial brethren kindly led me up, step by step, in official progress. . .

"During a large part of my masonic experience in Boston, the institution was passing through the ordeal of a relentless persecution. It 'tried the spirits.' It shewed that many weak, and some wicked persons had unfortunately found admission to an institution, where the one class is almost as much out of place as the other. The former were too easily frightened or coaxed into a renunciation of their Masonic vows — the latter took their 'thirty pieces of silver,' gave the treacherous kiss, and imitated their great prototype in all but the contrition which was his only redeeming trait. But it showed also that there were good men and true, worthy disciples of that ancient Masonic martyr whom they had all once personified. With an intelligent appreciation of their rights as citizens, and a lively sense of their Masonic obligations, these men were unmoved alike by legislative dictation, the denunciations of the press, the counsel of time-serving friends, and by every other form of action which the impertinent rascality of anti-masonry assumed. They were 'true as steel' — those Masons of Boston and Massachusetts, who breasted that storm, and defied those who raised and ruled it. I shall always honor and love them, and be proud in the recollection of having been, even one of the least of so resolute and faithful a band."

TROWEL, 2011

From TROWEL, Fall 2011, Page 14:

JoshuaFlint2011.jpg

Joshua B. Flint: Skilled Craftsman
by Rt. Wor. Walter H. Hunt.

During the 1830s, the Craft in Massachusetts met many trials and surpassed many obstacles. This decade, overshadowed by the anti-Masonic movement, threatened Freemasonry’s survival; but the men who led our fraternity in that time held to their vows and their beliefs. Many names are all but forgotten, and many figures have become no more than portraits dispassionately surveying our work today.

One of these brave men was Joshua Barker Flint, M. D., who served as Grand Master from February 1835 to September 1837. Born in 1801 in Cohasset, he was the youngest man ever elected Grand Master. He became a Mason in Columbian Lodge of Boston in 1822, and served five times as its Worshipful Master, in 1828 and from 1830- 1833; in the latter year he resigned due to his appointment as District Deputy Grand Master by Most Wor. Elijah Crane.

Grand Master Flint was chosen in an unusual circumstance. In December 1834, the Grand Lodge met and elected Francis Baylies of Taunton as its Grand Master for the coming year. Brother Baylies was a well-known speaker, who had delivered the address at the dedication of the new Temple in Boston, and had been appointed by the Grand Lodge to deliver a eulogy for the recently departed Marquis de Lafayette. He had been a member of the House of Representatives and the state assembly, to which he had just been re-elected, and would have been an outstanding leader for the fraternity due to his public stature.

However, when a committee of past Grand Masters communicated with Brother Baylies in February 1835, they received a reply that they were obliged to report to the Grand Lodge: “That for considerations which the committee deem sufficient, and which the chairman will communicate herewith, the R. W. Bro. Baylies feels obliged to revoke his former acceptance of the office of Grand Master.” This answer must have shocked and disappointed the members of the Grand Lodge (of which there were only 22 present on that cold February day). There were two ballots to elect his replacement; on the first, Past Grand Master John Soley received a number just short of what was needed for election. On the second, Joshua Flint barely surpassed that number, and was declared elected. A week later, on February 11, he was installed in the chair in ample form, the youngest man ever to occupy it.

The Grand Master’s View of his own Election

Brother Flint wrote to Grand Master John T. Heard about his election and service later in life:

“That office, at all times an eminently honorable and dignified one, was esteemed by me peculiarly honorable to myself, in view of the circumstances and considerations which determined my selection. The institution was in the midst of a bitter persecution. Many of those who had been entrusted with responsible offices had been seduced by the allurements of political ambition, and betrayed the interests that had been committed to them by a confiding fraternity, under assurances and engagements to fidelity which only the baseness of desperate villainy could disregard. ‘We must refrain from our usual practice of devoting to the Grand Mastership some brother whose distinction in public life blends itself becomingly and favorably with the highest Masonic dignity,’ said the brethren. ‘We can’t trust such candidates for political promotion,— we must find a man who has no such temptation, and on whose fidelity we can rely.’ Herein was the special honor of the office as it was conferred upon me.

“ ‘He will not betray us,’ said that vote of the brethren of the Grand Lodge, who had known me well—a vote by which I was placed in the most responsible and dignified Masonic position in the Commonwealth. This assurance of their confidence was better than the office, and has been felt by me to be so ever since.

“During a large part of my Masonic experience in Boston, the institution was passing through the ordeal of a relentless persecution. It tried the spirits. It showed that many weak and some wicked persons had unfortunately found admission to an institution where the one class is almost as much out of place as the other. The former were too easily frightened or coaxed into a renunciation of their Masonic vows; the latter took their ‘thirty pieces of silver,’ gave the treacherous kiss, and imitated their great prototype in all but the contrition, which was his only redeeming trait. But it showed also that there were good men and true, worthy disciples of that ancient Masonic martyr whom they had all once personified.

“With an intelligent appreciation of their rights as citizens, and a lively sense of their Masonic obligations, these men were unmoved alike by legislative dictation, the denunciations of the press, the counsel of time-serving friends, and by every other form of action which the impertinent rascality of anti-Masonry assumed. They were ‘true as steel,’ those Masons of Boston and Massachusetts who breasted that storm, and defied those who raised and ruled it. I shall always honor and love them, and be proud in the recollection of having been even one of the least of so resolute and faithful a band.”

A Medical Man

Dr. Flint was one of several physicians who served in high station in the Grand Lodge. He originally studied as a private pupil under Dr. John C. Warren at Harvard University, where he graduated in 1820 and from which he received a medical degree in 1825. While he resided in Boston, he was for many years physician for the Suffolk County Penitentiary, and was an expert on the emerging disease of cholera. In the late 1820s, he also established a course of popular lectures on anatomy, perhaps the first such course in America (and possibly the world) where it was taught publicly, with demonstrations of actual dissection. This was highly unusual for the times, as the dissection of human bodies and the public study of anatomy had only just become legal under the laws of Massachusetts. His renown as a medical doctor ultimately led to his departure from the state; he was invited by the Louisville Medical Institute to become the first chair of surgery in 1837. After three years at that position he was made a professor of surgery at the Kentucky School of Medicine — all before the age of forty.

Achievements as Grand Master

His terms as Grand Master were marked by difficulty — lodges seeking remission of dues or surrendering their charters, strained finances, and reports of continued hostility from the anti-Masonic movement; but much of the latter had spent its fury by mid-decade, and Brother Flint’s firm leadership kept the Grand Lodge attentive to its labors and dedicated to its ultimate goals. Though most of the Masonic activity in Massachusetts was focused on Boston, there was a slow but steady increase in participation, and the Grand Master reorganized the districts, appointing new District Deputy Grand Masters in 1836 for the six active districts, and designating Rt. Wor. Gardner Ruggles of Hardwick to act on behalf of the two functioning lodges in the far western part of the state. This organization prevailed until the fraternity’s recovery in the late 1840s made other arrangements necessary. Also under Brother Flint’s administration, the Grand Lodge was able to repurchase its Temple from the brother who had bought it earlier in the decade.

By the time of his death in 1864, the number of Masons who had personally known him was small. His portrait was painted from a small ‘'carte de visite’; by the esteemed artist Frederick Billings, and its accuracy was confirmed by friends and family.

There is no lodge named for Joshua Flint, nor are there medals or other awards. The greatest monument to his service and fidelity to the Craft is the fact that, within a decade of his term as Grand Master, the fraternity was alive and growing. His legacy as a physician, as well as a Mason, is that of a skilled craftsman, loved by his brethren and revered by his successors.

ODE DEDICATED TO JOSHUA FLINT

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly Magazine, Vol. I, No. 3, January 1842, pp. 94-95:

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FlintOde1842_2.jpg

MEMORIAL

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly Magazine, Vol. XXIII, No. 7, June 1864, p. 209:

PROFESSOR JOSHUA B. FLINT.

The decease of Professor Flint is no ordinary event. The departure of such a man is a public loss, and his numerous friends will read the announcement of his death with a deep gloom that can only be relieved by vivid recollections of his amiable and manly character. Such men constitute the sunshine of society, and their removal seems to darken the sources of happiness, and to check the play of a joyous spirit.

Joshua B. Flint was born in Cohasset, Mass., and died March 19th, 1864. He was the son of Rev. Flint, a true gentleman of the old school, and much beloved by his people. He was the clergyman of Cohasset previous to the time when the town was divided into parishes. Professor Flint was fitted for Harvard University at home, and graduated with honor in 1820. Soon after leaving the university, he became the assistant master of the English classical school in Boston, in which service he remained two years. At the end of that time he commenced the study of medicine, as private pupil of Dr. John C. Warren, matriculating as a student in the medical department of Harvard University. He received the degree ol M. D, after completing the usual term of pupilage, and was immediately selected as a candidate for practice in Boston, where he resided until 1837.

During that year he received an invitation from the managers of the Louisville Medical Institute, then just going into operation, to occupy the chair of surgery, in its first Faculty. He accepted the proposal, removed to Louisville, and has been there in the practice of his profession ever since. At the end of tiree years, he resigned his chair in the Institute, and a few years atterwards, acuepted the professorship of surgery in the Kentucky School of Medicine, at its commencement of a department of the Masonic College at Lagrange.

While in Boston, he was for a number of yeais. physician of the county penitentiary institutions, and was appointed one of the medical commission to visit New York in 1832, for the purpose of making observations in the then novel pestilence—cholera. In 1827 or 1828, he established a course of popular lectures on miatomy, the first, it is believed, in the country, or even in the world, where that science was taught publicly, and to miccellaneous classes, illustrated by actual dissections.

At the time when an effort was to be made in the legislature of Massachusetts, lo legalize the study of anatomy, he was elected as a representative from Boston, with a special view to the services which a medical gentleman interested on that subject, and well informed respecting it, mij1ht render in its behalf. He was on the committee thul proposed a leport and submitted a project of law, which led to ihe first legislative action promotive of human dissection, or the dissection of human bodies, which, probably, ever took place. He was continued in the legislature three years. He was, also, several times elected lo the Common Council of Boston, from the fouiih ward, where he resided.

He was an ardent and influential member of the Masonic Fraternity, and filled many places of trust and honor with credit lo himself, and with usefulness to those whom he served. He was made a Mason in Columbian Lodge, in this city, Nov. 20, 1822, admitted a member March 6, 1823, and an honorary member in 1840. He served as Marshal in 1824; as Senior Deacon in 1825 and 1826; as Junior Warden in 1827 ; and as Master in 1828, 1830. 1831, 1832, 1833. The latter office he resigned, October 20, 1828, on account of leaving the country ; and again, October 3, 1833, probably because he had been appointed D. D. G. Master. He was the D. D. G. Master of the first district in 1833, 1834 and 1835; and Grand Master in 1836 and 1837. The highest degree taken by him in Masonry is that of M. M. He has delivered several Masonic addresses at the request of Brethren; one at the centennial celebration of St. John's Lodge, one for St. John's day, at Concord, and several before Columbian Lodge. In a private note wiitten some years ago, he says—

"My early and intimate connexion with Masonry and Masons, in Boston, has supplied me with some of the most agreeable reminiscences of my life, as well as with some of the most precious friendships which I still enjoy. Especially is this remark true with respect to Columbian Lodge, within whose hallowed precincts ihnt connexion was formed, and whose partial Breihren kindly led me up, step by step, in official progress, to that position which has entitled rne lo the consideration implied in the interrogatories you have proposed.

"That position, moreover, is memorable to me, for having rendered me eligible to the Giand Mastership,—an office to which I was elected at an earlier age, both as a Mason and a man, than any one before or after me. That office, at all times an eminently honorable and dignified one, was esteemed by me peculiarly honorable to myself, in view of the circumstances and considerations which determined my selection. The institution was in the midst of a bitter persecution; many of those who had been intrusted with responsible offices had been seduced by the allurements of political ambition, and betrayed the interests that had been committed to them by a confiding Fraternity, under assurances and engagements to fidelity which only the baseness of desperate villainy could disregard. 'We must refrain from our usual practice of devoting to the Grand Mastership some Brother, whose distinction, in public life, blended itself becomingly and favorably with the highest Masonic dignity, 'said the Brethren—'we can't trust such candidates for political promotion—we must find a man who has rto such temptation, and on whose fidelity we can rely.' Herein was the special honor of the office as it was conferred upon me.' He will not betray us,' said that vote of the Brethren of the G. Lodge who had known me well, a »ote by which I was placed in ths most responsible and dignified Masonic position in the Common, wealth. This assurance of their confidence was better than the office, and has been felt by me, to be so, ever since.

"During a large part of my Masonic experience in Boston, the Institution was passing through the ordeal of a relentless persecution. ' It tried the spirits.' It showed that many weak, and some wicked, persons had unfortunately found admission to an institution, where the one class is almost as much out of plane as the other. The former were too easily frightened or coaxed into a renunciation of their Masonic vows—the latter took their ' thirty pieces of silver,' gave the treacherous kiss, and imitated their great prototype in all but the contrition which was his only redeeming trait. But it showed also that there were good men and true, worthy disciples of that ancient Masonic martyr whom they had all once personified. With an intelligent appreciation of their rights as citizens, and a lively sense of their Masonic obligations, these men were unmoved alike by legislative dictation, the denunciations of the piess, the counsel of time-serving friends, and by every other form of action which the impertinent rascality of anti-masonry assumed. They were ' true as steel'—those Masons of Boston and Massachusetts, who breasted that storm, and defied those who raised and ruled it. I shall always honor and love Ihem, and be proud in the recollection of having been even one of the least of so resolute and faithful a band."

For many years a Professor and a public Teacher, he never ceased to be the devoted Student. But few such men are to be found in society ; but wherever their lot is cast, there you will find the sunshine of a joyous spirit, and the fruita of a noble mind.

Thus far we had written our notice of Brother Flint when we received a copy of The Louisville Daily Democrat, of March 22, which contained the following admirable testimony of his professional brethren in the city of Louisville. Their just and accurate appreciation of our respected Brother, shows that tune and locality had no power to change his nature, nor to lesson those inestimable qualities which ever endeared him to those with whom he was associated :—

At a meeting of the practitioners of medicine in the city of Louisville, held on Monday, the 21st inst., in the basement room of the Christian Church, corner of Fourth and Walnut streets, Professor Lewis Rogers was called to the chair, and Dr. Wm. Bailey was appointed Secretary.

The chairman having explained that the object of the meeting was to pay respect to the memory of Professor J. B. Flint, on motion of Dr. T. S. Bell, a committee consisting of Drs. T. S. Bell, H. Miller, U. E. Ewing and J. W. Knight was appointed to report appropriate proneeuiniis for this purpose.

The committee reported the following sketch of the character of Professor Flint, and the accompanying resolutions :—

The medical profession and the community at large were astonished last Saturday morning in hearing of the demise of Professor J. B. Flint. He has been among us in an honorable and highly useful career ihrnugh such a lons series uf years, his life has been so quiet and regular, his professional duties have been so faithfully and actively peformed, he seemed to be so much on Friday like he had been daily for years, that the annoucement of his death in the early hours of Saturday morning startled the whole community. Nearly twentyseven years ago he was called to this oity as a teacher of surgery, and from thai time to the day of his death he has ever held a high position among his professional friends, and enjoyed a wide spread confidence among the people. He was eminent as a general scholar, and pre-eminent in the liieratuie of his profession. These graces of acquisition were pleasantly set in a quiet, unobtrusive, unassuming disposition. Those who enjoyed his professional aid will never forget his gentle kind, assiduous attentions. His professional Brethren who enjoyed his acquaintance can never cease to regard him as an exemplar in the highest possible degree of the comity and courtesy that are recognized as an essential part of a gentleman, in the very best sense of that term. There are many present who have needed his professional advice and skill, either for themselves or for members of their family, and no one of these will fail to bear testimony to his devotion, his kindness iind excellence toward all his professional Brethren. In these respects he was one of the most reinaikable physicians we have ever known.

Professor Flint was a most worthy example to those who claim the confidence of the community in a public element of his usefulness. There are very few members of the kindred profession who possessed such a perfect and extensive scholarship as that which filted him for every prolessional duty. But this large possession did not entice him to repose. He was an earnest student up to almost the moment of his overwhelming attack, and up to almost that moment he was engaged in visiting patients.

In view of the rare qualities of our departed friend, both as a physician and a friend, we feel bow inadequate are words to expiess the profound sense of our bereavement. He is woithy of hiiih praise, but who may attempt to reach that hei«ht? Yet the expression may be attempted, however it may fall short of what is due: therefore be it

Resolved, That we are keenly alive to the extent of the bereavement caused by the death of Professor J. B. Flint, our associate in the arduous duties of the practice of medicine.

Resolved, That in the death of Professor Flint we have lost an able counsellor, a skillful surgeon, a physician of rare endowments, and one of the kindest und most faithful of friends.

Resolved, That --- ---- be requested to prepare a biographical sketch of Prof. Flint, and deliver it as an address to the medical profession of the city and to the public who, for nearly twentyseven years, have enjoyed the benefit of his professional ministrations.

Resolved, That we attend the funeral services of our late associate in practice.

Resolved, That a copy of these proceedings be presented to the family of Professor Flint.

Resolved, That these proceedings be published in the city papers.

It was moved by Dr. Bell thai the blank in the ihiid lesulutinn be filled with the name of Prof. Lewis Rogers, but he declined on account of his health, and the meeting appointed Prof. T. S. Bell to perform the duty.

Lewis Rogers, M. D, Chairman.
Wm. Bailey, M. D., Secretary.

CHARTERS GRANTED

None.



Grand Masters