MAGLJDadmun

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DADMUN, JOHN W. 1819-1890

JohnDadmun_GrCh.jpg

BIOGRAPHY

FROM PROCEEDINGS, 1873

From Proceedings, Page 1873-373:

He was born in Hubbardston, Mass., Dec. 20,1819. He was initiated into Masonry in Mount Lebanon Lodge, Boston, Feb. 14, 1859. His father, not having the means to give him a thorough education, gave him his time when he was eighteen years of age, and he succeeded in working his way along until he completed an academical education at the Wesleyan Academy, located in Wilbraham, Mass.

He joined the New England Methodist Conference at the age of twenty-two years; and has been pastor of churches in the towns of Ludlow, Southampton, South Hadley Falls, Enfield, Ware, Monson, Ipswich and Lowell; of the First Methodist Church and Grace Church, Boston; First Church, Boston Highlands; and for the last eight years he has been Chaplain and Superintendent of schools in the city institutions of Boston at Deer Island.

He has published musical works as follows: — "Revival Melodies," "Melodeon," "Eolian Harp," "Timbrel," "Humming- Bird," and " Masonic Choir." In a note recently written by him, he says, " Some of the happiest hours of my life have been spent in social intercourse with my Brethren in Masonry, particularly in the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, while I served as Grand Chaplain and District Deputy Grand Master . . . I rejoice exceedingly in the prosperity of our beloved Institution in the good old Commonwealth of Massachusetts."

FROM LIBERAL FREEMASON, 1885

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. VIII, No. 10, January 1885, Page 306:

The subject of this sketch has long been actively interested in masonic matters, in the A. and A. Scottish Rite as well as in the American Rite, and has contributed by voice and pen to secure a higher appreciation of the principles of the Masonic Institution.

In 1869, as successor to Henry Chickering, then Grand High Priest, he made his first report to the Grand Chapter of Massachusetts, and these interesting papers have been submitted by him annually since then, with the exception of 1875, when he was Grand High Priest, and appointed Alfred F. Chapman to make the report for that year. The matters discussed in these reports have been, at times, of more than ordinary interest, and Brother Dadmun has aided very decidedly in reaching satisfactory and correct conclusions. That this is true, a reference to corresponding reports will fully sustain.

John W. Dadmun was born in the town of Hubbardston, Mass., December 20th, 1819, completed his academical education at Wilbraham, and at the early age of twenty years he commenced to preach under a license. Two years later he joined the New England Methodist Conference, and afterward was assigned to some of its leading churches.

He has been pastor of churches in the towns of Ludlow, Southampton, South Hadley Falls, Enfield, Ware, Monson, and Ipswich; and in the cities of Lowell, Worcester, Boston, and Roxbury. During the last twenty years he has been Chaplain and Superintendent of Schools in the Institutions at Deer Island, belonging to the City of Boston.

Brother Dadmun has always taken great interest in music and nothing seems to be more to his liking than to get a company of singers, a whole congregation, if possible, to join with him in singing some of the popular religious songs of the period ; his enthusiasm in this particular awakens that of others, and many happy hours have been passed under this influence. The musical books published by him have carried his name to all quarters of the globe. Foremost among these works are the "Timbrel," "Eolian Harp," "Sacred Harmonium," "Melodeon," "Army and Navy Melodies," and "Masonic Choir."

The last of these has been of much service in Masonic bodies, where it is desirable that all should join in singing. The "Melodies" were very popular in the Army and Navy, and 100,000 copies were sold. The "Melodeon" has had the large sale of 400,000 copies, and has circulated in England, Australia and India very largely.

Our preacher and musical brother was made a Mason in Mt. Lebanon Lodge, in Boston, and became a member of that body February 14th, 1859, and in 1865-66 was Senior Warden. He was District Deputy Grand Master of the then Sixth Masonic District in 1862-63, ancl Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for the years 1866, '67, '68.

It may be noted as exceptional that our Brother was appointed District Deputy Grand Master before he had been Master of a Lodge, but the Constitution then permitted and Brother Dadmun was regarded as eminently fitted for it.

Early in the year 1867, he with others, received a Dispensation to organize Zetland Lodge, in Boston, under date of April 15th of that year. In this he was named to be the first Master, an office in which he was continued until December 15th, 1868, the Lodge having been constituted in the presence of ladies on the 11th day of March, preceding, and of this Lodge he is now Chaplain.

On May 11th, 1859, ne was made a Royal Arch Mason in St. Paul's Chapter, in Boston, and became a member of that body; he dimitted from it, however, in October, 1865, to help organize Mount Vernon Chapter in Roxbury, and of this he was the first M. E. High Priest. He was Deputy Grand High Priest in 1865, and in 1875 was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Massachusetts, but at the end of the year he preferred to return to his more congenial work, as Committee on Correspondence.

He received the degrees in Boston Council of Royal and Select Masters early in 1860, and was admitted a member April 26th in that year. In this body he has filled various offices as occasion required, but principally as Chaplain. In 1861, he was Right Puissant Grand Master, a title now obsolete, in the Grand Council, and in 1863-64 was M. I. Grand Master. In this body he is Committee on Correspondence.

The orders of Knighthood were conferred upon him in De Molay Commandery, in Boston, and he became a member thereof, March 28th, 1860. He served the Commandery several years as Prelate, was its Eminent Commander in 1867 and 1868, and is now Grand Prelate of the Grand Commandery of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Brother Dadmun received the degrees in the A. and A. Scottish Rite in 1863, to the 32°, and was the first Thrice P. Grand Master of Worcester Lodge of Perfection, chartered in September of that year.

As a working Mason, our Brother is conspicuous, and the many hours he has given to it, not represented by offices herein mentioned, entitle him to the high consideration of the Craft. In manner, he is genial; in method, painstaking, and as a ritualist, correct. He has ever been open to the call of his brethren to do them service; he has plead for the needy, spoken for the dead, cheered the distressed, and is ever ready if need be, to continue in the severest duty, if by his example, the Wisdom, Strength and Beauty of Freemasonry can be more completely illustrated.

MEMORIAL

From Proceedings, Page 1890-78:

A few weeks ago we were all startled by the announcement of the sudden death of our Rev. Brother John W. Dadmun. It will be remembered that he officiated as our Grand Chaplain at the Quarterly Communication in June last. Few Brethren were more generally known throughout the jurisdiction; a fact which was due in part to his service in many localities throughout the State as a preacher of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in part to his service in numerous offices of the different branches of our Fraternity.

He was born in Hubbardston, Mass., Dec. 20, 1819, and died at Deer Island, on the 6th of August last. He received his early education at Wesleyan Academy, of Wilbraham, Mass., and joined the New England Methodist Conference at the age of twenty-two years.

He was initiated in Mount Lebanon Lodge, of Boston, Feb. 14, 1859. He was a Charter member and the first Master of Zetland Lodge, of Boston, serving ih the latter capacity in the years 1867 and 1868. In 1863, 1864 and 1865, he filled the office of District Deputy Grand Master of the 6th, then the Worcester District, and in the years 1866, 1867 and 1868, he officiated as Grand Chaplain.

For the last twenty-five years he had been employed as Chaplain and Superintendent of Schools in the institutions of the city of Boston at Deer Island. While engaged there in the familiar and frequent duty of conducting an exhibition drill of the boys in one of the institutions — a duty in which he took great satisfaction — he was suddenly attacked with apoplexy, and died in a few moments. He was a most conscientious, faithful and devoted teacher, a kind and sympathetic friend, as well as a judicious adviser to all who would accept of his ministrations.

Nearly twenty years ago he said to Past Grand Master Heard: "Some of the happiest hours of my life have been spent in social intercourse with my Brethren in Masonry, particularly in the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, while I served as Grand Chaplain and District Deputy Grand Master." His active interest and efficient service in the Fraternity continued until the day of his death, and he will be sadly missed from several of our most flourishing organizations. His prominence in our ranks and his long and valuable services seem to demand this brief tribute to his memory, although he was not, at the time of his death an Officer or member of this Grand Lodge.


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