Difference between revisions of "Columbian"

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(GRAND LODGE OFFICERS)
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* William M. Olin, 1903, 1904
 
* William M. Olin, 1903, 1904
 
* James E. Brown, 1905
 
* James E. Brown, 1905
* '''[http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=GMLAbbott Leon M. Abbott]''', 1906
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* '''[http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=GMLAbbott Leon M. Abbott]''', 1906, 1907
 
* Thornton D. Appollonio, 1908, 1909
 
* Thornton D. Appollonio, 1908, 1909
 
* W. Clifton Jones, 1910, 1911
 
* W. Clifton Jones, 1910, 1911

Latest revision as of 20:50, 10 September 2019

MA_Columbian.gif

Contents

COLUMBIAN LODGE

Location: Boston

Chartered By: Paul Revere

Charter Date: 06/13/1796 II-84

Precedence Date: 06/13/1795

Current Status: Active


NOTES

Chartered in 1796. This was the first new lodge chartered in Boston after the merger of the two Grand Lodges; in fact, there had been two previous attempts in 1793 and 1794 to obtain a charter for a new Boston lodge that were rejected by the Grand Lodge.

Columbian Lodge is one of several lodges with an extant Revere charter.

MEMBER LIST, 1802

From Vocal Companion and Masonic Register, Boston, 1802, Part II, Page 15:

  • R. W. Amasa Stetson, M.
  • W. Daniel Baxter, S. W.
  • W. Elisha Tower, J. W.
  • Ammi Cutler, Sec.
  • Samuel Stetson, Tr.
  • Thomas Pons, S. D.
  • John Swett, J. D.
  • Samuel Jenks, Steward.
  • Scammell Penniman, Steward.
  • Alexander Davidson, Steward.
  • Ebenezer Mountford, Tiler.

No. of Members, 30.

  • John W. Folsom, P. M.
  • Samuel Jenks, Jr.
  • William V. Lynch
  • Samuel Albree
  • Joseph Kelly
  • Israel Jenkins
  • Eleazer Davidson
  • William Flinn
  • Turner Crooker
  • J. Waters, Jr.
  • William J. McDovell
  • Silas Penniman
  • Elisha Towers
  • William Williams
  • John Perkins
  • Zebina Eastman
  • Warren Ware
  • John Raymond
  • Michael Keane
  • John Murry
  • Oliver Steel
  • Seth H. Moore
  • James S. White

PAST MASTERS

  • Joseph Churchill, 1795-1798
  • John W. Folsom, 1799-1801
  • Amasa Stetson, 1802, 1803
  • Daniel Baxter, 1804-1806, 1809
  • Stephen Bean, 1807, 1808
  • Joseph Jenkins, 1810-1813, 1817, 1818
  • David Moody, 1814
  • Elijah Morse, 1815
  • Benjamin B. Appleton, 1816, 1841
  • Aaron Bean, 1819, 1820
  • Samuel Smith, 1821, 1822
  • Daniel Baxter, Jr., 1823-1825
  • George G. Smith, 1826, 1827, 1829, 1842-1845
  • Joshua B. Flint, 1828, 1830-1833
  • David Tillson, 1834-1836; Mem
  • Ruel Baker, 1837-1840; Mem
  • George M. Thatcher, 1846, 1847
  • Peter C. Jones, 1848, 1849
  • William W. Baker, 1850, 1851
  • William T. Coolidge, 1852, 1853
  • John T. Heard, 1854, 1855
  • William B. Fowle, 1856, 1857
  • Robert L. Robbins, 1858
  • Charles E. Buckingham, 1859, 1860
  • Sylvester Trull, 1861, 1862
  • Henry W. Warren, 1863, 1864
  • John Roundy, 1865
  • Josiah A. Stearns, 1866, 1867
  • William H. Kennard, 1868, 1869
  • George M. Baker, 1870, 1871
  • William T.R. Marvin, 1872, 1873
  • William J. Stevens, 1874-1876
  • Albert A. Folsom, 1877, 1878
  • Frederick Alford, 1879, 1880
  • George A. Gillette, 1881, 1882
  • Walter M. Cameron, 1883, 1884
  • E. Bentley Young, 1885, 1886; Mem
  • Albert A. Hall, 1887, 1888
  • J. George Cooper, 1889, 1890
  • Isaac H. Locke, 1891, 1892
  • William White, 1893, 1894; SN
  • J. Foster Bush, 1895, 1896
  • Joseph S. Kendall, 1897, 1898
  • Frank O. Guild, 1899, 1900
  • Moses C. Plummer, 1901, 1902
  • William M. Olin, 1903, 1904
  • James E. Brown, 1905
  • Leon M. Abbott, 1906, 1907
  • Thornton D. Appollonio, 1908, 1909
  • W. Clifton Jones, 1910, 1911
  • George J. Prescott, 1912, 1913
  • Howard M. Fletcher, 1914, 1915; SN
  • Franklin C. Jillson, 1916, 1917
  • Elmer C. Read, 1918, 1919
  • George L. Willey, 1920, 1921
  • Ralph C. Blocksom, 1922, 1923
  • George R. Marvin, 1924, 1925
  • Herbert F. Hartwell, 1926, 1927
  • Robert C. Jamieson, 1928, 1929
  • Carl C. Childs, 1930, 1931
  • Elias Field, 1932, 1933
  • George F. Hatch, 1934, 1935
  • J. Frederick Mann, 1936, 1937
  • Walter G. Carlisle, 1938, 1939
  • Leslie D. Martin, 1940, 1941
  • Adam O. Hofling, 1942, 1943; N
  • Ethelbert V. Grabill, 1944, 1945
  • Arthur Anderson, 1946, 1947
  • Donald W. Vose, 1948, 1949; Mem
  • Herman A. Osgood, 1950, 1951
  • Bernhard Matthei, 1952, 1953
  • Burton J. Dillion, 1958, 1959; N
  • Leland C. Richardson, 1960, 1961; N
  • Theodore W. Dearborn, Jr., 1962, 1963
  • William D. Boyle, 1964, 1965
  • Robert E. Black, 1966, 1967
  • Charles L. Young, 1968, 1969
  • Graves D. Hewitt, 1970, 1971
  • Richard K. Paul, 1972, 1973
  • F. Weston Prior, 1974, 1975
  • Royal V. Roberts, 1976, 1977
  • Chester A. Abbey, 1978, 1979
  • Gerard C. McDonough, 1980, 1981
  • Russell P. Mead, 1982, 1983
  • D. James Phillips, 1984, 1985; SN
  • Richard M. Merrill, 1986, 1987
  • George A. Harris, III, 1988, 1989, 2002, 2003
  • Harris T. Luscomb, III, 1990, 1991
  • Michael L. Smith, 1992, 1993
  • Michael A. Sandberg, 1994, 1995
  • Nicky J. Ingaciola, 1996, 1997
  • Christopher A. Mamakos, 1998, 1999
  • Theodore P. Avtges, 2000, 2001
  • Robert E. Heruska, 2004, 2005
  • Richard A. Smith, 2006, 2007
  • Callum J. F. Maclean, 2008, 2009
  • Jacques R. Lucchesi, 2010, 2011
  • Ronald T. Doucette, 2012, 2013
  • Daniel R. Madore, 2014, 2015
  • Peter J. Lawson, 2016, 2017
  • Daniel L. Taylor, 2018, 2019

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Dispensation: 1795
  • Petition for Charter: 1796

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1895 (Centenary)
  • 1945 (150th Anniversary)
  • 1970 (175th Anniversary)
  • 1995 (200th Anniversary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1854 1871 1874 1881 1883 1885 1887 1889 1891 1894 1897 1900 1901 1908 1913 1918 1920 1921 1923 1929 1938 1944 1945 1946 1954 1970 1976 1977 1982 1986 1994 2007 2010

HISTORY

  • 1945 (150th Anniversary History, 1945-186)
  • 1970 (175th Anniversary History, 1970-288; see below)
  • 1995 (200th Anniversary History, 1995-129; see below)

175TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, JUNE 1970

From Proceedings, Page 1970-288:

By Brother Collins Graham.

There is no record in the minutes of Columbian Lodge during the year 1845 of any celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the granting of the Dispensation and the first Meeting, but M. W. John Trull Heard, Master of Columbian Lodge in 1854 and 1855 and Grand Master of Massachusetts in 1857-58-59, personally put together a monumental history and a compendium of facts about our Lodge, a copy of which was distributed to the membership on February 7, 1856 in book form. This extraordinary piece of effort has been the source of our knowledge of the early days of our Lodge.

The Lodge distributed to all members an elaborate account of the 1895 Centennial celebration — the church service and the banquet — in an attractive bound volume and just prior to that put out a smaller bound volume describing the exercises at the consecration of the burial lot in Mount Auburn Cemetery which took place in June 1892.

In June of 1917 the Lodge issued in leaflet form a brief summary of Columbian's history between 1795 and 1895 written by R. W. William T. R. Marvin.

The 125th Anniversary of Columbian Lodge was observed by a visit from M. W. Arthur D. Prince, Grand Master, and his Suite. Wor. George J. Prescott acted as Historian and the details of the affair are set forth in the minutes of the June 3, 1920 meeting of the Lodge.

The 150th Anniversary occurred during the administration of R. W. Ethelbert V. Grabill who built the celebration around a reception, dinner and pageant in the Boston Temple on Thursday, June 7, 1945. (1945 Mass.195-207) The pageant and dialogue, composed by R. W. Bro. Grabill, portrayed 'The Influence of Masonry in the History of Our Nation and Masonry's Opportunity in the World Order". It contained four scenes:

  • Scene I — At Valley Forge
  • Scene II — At the Home of Benjamin Franklin
  • Scene III — In a Sub-Committee Room of the U.S. Senate
  • Scene IV — Rising Sun of Peace

The script, giving the dialogues, is probably in the papers of our late Bro. Grabill, but the Scenes and the Dramatis Personae indicate that Bro. Grabill got his inspiration from the 20th Degree (Master Ad Vitam) of the Massachusetts Consistory. Forty-eight were at the head table, including M. W. Samuel H. Wragg, Grand Master, and Mrs. Wragg, accompanied by a large and distinguished Suite.

Your Historian, Bro. Collins Graham, who was the head usher and in general charge of the mechanics of the affair, wrote on the envelope containing his file, "a splendid affair — beautifully planned and executed". In addition to the Lodge Communication, your Historian has the bulletins issued by Bro. Grabill, the program of the play, an itemized list of the head table guests, and similarly the names of the members who were present. Our member, Irving Seiler, was in charge of the catering.

Columbian Lodge is one of the few Lodges in Massachusetts to have an officially appointed "Historian". Collins Graham was so appointed by Wor. Theodore W. Dearborn, Jr. when he became Master in December 1961.

It is the custom in Massachusetts at the observance of anniversaries, which often begin in the 25th year, for the presiding Master to appoint one of the older Past Masters to read a paper marking the sequence of important events which have taken place during the period under review. Under such circumstances, nothing more than a brief reference can be made on any one happening. A Historian's efforts should be directed towards those members of his Lodge who are interested in the history of their Lodge. He is in office for their benefit and edification. He should record milestones in the life of the Lodge and then concentrate on each one so that no one else will ever have to do research on the same subject. He should do this so that important Lodge events will be an official part of the Lodge records and be available for all future time. The papers should also be filed in the Columbian Lodge folders in the Grand Lodge Library and those read before the Grand Master on a Visitation, which automatically become a part of Grand Lodge records, should be distributed to all members. Many members, for various reasons — old age, illness, absence from the city — are unable to attend our meetings. Their only source of contact with the Lodge is receipt of the monthly communication so that a bound volume of historical importance describing events which have taken place while they are members, but which they could not witness in person, would be the equivalent of a personal greeting from the Master and Officers.

With such an objective in mind, Bro. Graham has prepared eight pages on important events and personalities which have stood out down the years in Columbian Lodge: Four have been read before the Lodge, one of which has been made a part of the records of the Grand Lodge and distributed to the members. As the Grand Master will grace our official celebration, the bound volume prepared for distribution to our members will automatically become an official part of Grand Lodge records for all time.

The 175th Anniversary Committee appointed by Wor. Charles L. Young and Wor. Graves D. Hewitt consists of: Rt. Wor. Donald W. Vose, Chairman; Wor. Graves D. Hewitt, cx-officio; Wor. Charles L. Young, Rt. Wor. Rowland A. Crowell, Bro. Richard K. Paul, Bro. F. Weston Prior, Bro. Collins Graham, Bro. Edward J. Loy, Jr., Bro. Philip C Stolar.

The resources of the Lodge in human talent and financial sinew have been called upon to make our 175th Anniversary the equal of those which have been held before.

MASONIC SUNDAY

Our Chaplain, Bro. and Dr. William Arthur Rice, Pastor of the Highland Congregational Church in Roxbury, inaugurated in 1960 a Masonic Sunday held usually in May of each year, the guests being officers of the Lodge who arc invited to take part in the Service.

Bro. Rice was appointed our spiritual leader in 1944 by R.W. Ethelbert V. Grabill, and this particular activity was begun during the administration of R. W. Leland C. Richardson.

HOW COLUMBIAN LODGE GOT ITS NAME

Columbian Lodge came into being through a Dispensation and Charter issued by the (United) Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and signed by Paul Revere in the first year of his three-year term, that is in June 1795. He was Grand Master in 1795-96-97.

Prior to 1792 there had been three Grand Lodges:

  • St. John (Provincial) Grand Lodge —1733-1792
  • Massachusetts (Provincial) Grand Lodge — 1769-1777
  • Massachusetts (Independent) Grand Lodge — 1777-1792

Paul Revere was a member of Massachusetts (Independent) Grand Lodge having served as Senior Grand Deacon in 1769; Junior Grand Warden in 1777-78-79; and Deputy Grand Master in 1784-85 and again in 1791-92.

The St. John (Provincial) Grand Lodge and the Massachusetts (Independent) Grand Lodge united in March 1792 to form the present Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Paul Revere being the second Grand Master. It was at this time (1792) that the numbering of Lodges was discontinued.

The origin of the name and the formation of the group who called themselves "The Columbian Society of Master Masons" are not known for sure though a great deal has been written about them. It is quite possible that their immediate concern was along benevolent and social lines and their ultimate the formation of a Lodge — their own Lodge — to which they could all belong.

Rt. Wor. W. T. R. Marvin, in his historical address at the 100th Anniversary Banquet in 1895, refers to the Columbian Centinel. Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison, in his recent biography of "Harrison Gray Otis 1765-1848 The Urbane Federalist", states: "The Columbian Centinel, oldest and most respectable of the Boston Federalist press, promoted Lowell's scheme . . ." This was in 1814 just before the Hartford Convention at which the Federalists of Massachusetts and Connecticut advocated war with France and threatened to secede from the Union.

After the Revolution, Columbia and Uncle Sam became popular representations of our country. "Columbia the Gem of the Ocean" became a popular song and Uncle Sam in his plug hat, cutaway and striped trousers are familiar to you all. It is likely, therefore, that our forebears in Columbian Lodge chose a popular name to attach themselves to and that they directed their publicity to the Columbian Centinel which we can assume was a powerful Boston newspaper and a local namesake.

The first mention of the Columbians appears around 1792. They formed a committee which petitioned unsuccessfully for a charter in 1794 which indicates that their prime objective was the formation of a new Lodge. This they received on their second try in 1795 and having been instrumental in forming our Lodge and giving it its name, they gradually passed out of existence and nothing was heard of them after 1807. However, regardless of our conjectures, since there are few written traces of their history, we are grateful to them as the founders of our Columbian Lodge because if they had not been successful in their efforts, we would not be here tonight.

Since the social side of Masonry was considered an important adjunct to Lodge activities, the Columbians probably transferred to Columbian Lodge itself since the latter had a hall of its own to which the members repaired after the Lodge meeting was closed. In the old days the Lodges met in the evening, sodalities on Saturdays, started work around seven, handled two sometimes three degrees, and closed around ten.

Now as to the medallion which appears on our Communications and which was impressed in the outside cover of the bound volume covering the Centennial in 1895, I quote from pages 14 and 15:

"The committee on medals gave the order for the dies to Mr. Henry Mitchell of Boston who is generally admitted to be one of the most skillful engravers of our time. His work was eminently satisfactory to the committee and the Lodge for its artistic character, and the medal has been greatly admired by all who have seen it. The obverse bears a spirited head of Columbia, in profile to the left, following the famous statue, "the Genius of America", by Thomas Crawford, in the Capitol of Washington. She wears the eagle-crested helmet with a circlet of stars; the locks of her hair, unconfined except by the helmet, float gracefully backward upon her neck; beneath the decollation is the motto of the Lodge, SEMPER UBIQUE. The device is surrounded by a knotted cable-tow, outside of which is the legend, COLUMBIAN LODGE, F. A. M., BOSTON, MASS., and below, completing the circle, INSTITUTED, JUNE 8, 1795.

"On the reverse is an open wreath formed of olive branches, vine-leaves and clusters of grapes, with sprigs of wheat at the terminals — symbols of "corn, wine, and oil"; the olive branches at the bottom have their stems crossed and surmounted by a small square and compasses. Within the wreath is the inscription, 1795 JOS. CHURCHILL, W. M. JAMES EATON, S. W. JOHN RITTENHOUSE, J.W. 1895 J. FOSTER BUSH, W. M. JOS. S. KENDALL, S. W. F. OSCAR GUILD, J. W. These were the officers at the dates indicated. Above the wreath was the legend (from Proverbs ix, I) WISDOM HATH BUILDED HER HOUSE, and at the bottom, CENTENARY 1895.

"A few impressions were struck in silver to be attached to the collars worn by the Officers of the Lodge as a part of their regalia, and a sufficient number in bronze to provide each member with a medal, and to place examples in the cabinets of a few public institutions, etc., to be preserved in commemoration of the event. The dies were then ordered to be destroyed."

THE MASONIC CAREER OF PAUL REVERE

Everyone who has belonged, belongs now or will belong to Columbian Lodge is the possessor of a goodly heritage. Columbian Lodge is the fourth oldest Lodge in the Boston First District, which contains the two oldest Lodges in the Massachusetts Jurisdiction — St. John's founded in 1733 and the Lodge of Saint Andrew founded in 1756.

The Grand Master who issued our Charter on June 8, 1795 was one of the most prominent citizens and Masons of Colonial times, Paul Revere.

Paul Revere was made a Mason in the Lodge of Saint Andrew on September 4, 1760 and he served that Lodge as Deacon, Secretary and Senior Warden. He was its Presiding Master in 1770 and 1771, 1777 through 1779 and 1780 through 1782. He also served as Master of Rising States Lodge (long since dissolved) in 178+ and 1791 and its Treasurer in 1785. He was Junior Warden of the Royal Arch Lodge out of which grew Saint Andrew's Royal Arch Chapter. Most Worshipful Brother Revere was its first Senior Grand Deacon.

He was Junior Grand Warden in 1777, 1778 and 1779 (while he was Presiding Master of the Lodge of Saint Andrew), Senior Grand Warden in 1780 to 1783 (also while he was Presiding Master of the Lodge of Saint Andrew), and Deputy Grand Master 178+ and 1785 and 1791 and 1792. After the union of the Massachusetts and Saint John's Grand Lodges, he was the second Grand Master serving from December 1794 through 1795, 1796 and 1797.

He died on May 10, 1818, in his 84th year, at his home which is still preserved at 19 North Square, Boston. His is an outstanding Masonic career very dear to us and one which makes the Lodge of Saint Andrew particularly almost a cousin to Columbian Lodge.

Most Worshipful Brother Revere's administration took place during a period of great Masonic growth and activity. His name is on the Charters of the following particular Lodges beginning with 1795.

  • 1795
    • Columbian, Boston
    • Republican, Greenfield
    • Evening Star, Lee
    • Cincinnatus, Great Barrington
    • Middlesex, Framingham
    • King Hiram's, Provincetown
  • 1796
    • 
Union, Dorchester
    • Washington, Roxbury
    • Harmony, Northfield
    • Thomas, Palmer
  • 1797

    • Hiram, Arlington

    • Corinthian, Concord

    • Saint Paul, Ayer

    • Jerusalem, Northampton

    • Olive Branch, Millbury

    • Montgomery, Milford
    • Meridian, Natick
    • Bristol, North Attleboro

    • Fellowship, Bridgewater

This makes nineteen in all and the locations mentioned show how our forebears were branching out from Boston, then a town of around 20,000 persons.

LOCATIONS OF COLUMBIAN LODGE

The Grand Lodge and Columbian Lodge have been in the Temple we now occupy since 1899, for 62 years, the longest period of time in the history of the Grand Lodge. Previously Columbian Lodge has occupied the following locations: Concert Hall on Court Street; the Lodge Room in the Green Dragon Tavern on Union Street between Hanover Street and Haymarket Square; Columbian Hall and Mason's Hall in Market Square near Faneuil Hall; the Exchange Coffee House on State and Congress Streets; the Old State House; Washington Hall; the Old Masonic Temple which was at the corner of Tremont Street and Temple Place where R. H. Stearns Building now stands; Nassau Hall; Winthrop House; Thorndike Hall.

THE TROWEL USED AT THE LAYING OF THE CORNERSTONE OF BUNKER HILL MONUMENT

The cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument was laid before an immense throng of citizens and Masons on June 17, 1825, during the administration of Most Worshipful John Abbot of Westford, who was Grand Master in 1824,1825, 1826, and again in 1834; and an absorbing description of the meeting is set forth in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge for the year 1825.

At eight o'clock in the morning the Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form, and after the introduction to the Most Worshipful Grand Master of a very large Suite, including five Past Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Brother Marquis of Lafayette and the presiding officers of the Grand Institutions in New England, a procession was formed on Boston Common, where it was joined by a large procession of military and civilian groups, and at nine o'clock all marched over to Charlestown. The Officers of the Grand Lodge and other Masonic Bodies followed by the entire Masonic delegation, marched immediately behind the first military escort which included the survivors of the battle; the President of the United States, the Honorable John Quincy Adams; the Marquis of Lafayette, described in the proceedings as Right Worshipful Brother Lafayette; the Governor of Massachusetts, Honorable Levi Lincoln; the Mayor of Boston, Honorable Josiah Quincy, a member of Saint John's Lodge of Boston; all of the Governors of all of the other New England States; all State Officers; members of the National House and Senate; Judges of the United States Supreme Court and the Massachusetts Courts; the Presidents of New England Colleges; and the President of the Bunker Hill Monument Association, Honorable Daniel Webster, at that time the leading lawyer of this City and a Member of Congress from this District. All of these figures were in carriages escorted by military and Naval groups and bands. The majority of the Blue Lodge Masons were clothed in plain white aprons, white gloves and blue sashes. The Royal Arch Masons and the Knights Templars were in full uniform with their banners.

Time prevents me from describing the details of this great event. However, at 10 o'clock, in keeping with the beautiful and dignified ritual of the Craft, in full form the Grand Master, assisted by his Officers, laid the first trowel of cement, then handed it to Right Worshipful Brother Lafayette, who applied the second trowel of cement. Then, followed what the public records of the day described as a magnificent oration by Mr. Webster, and finally an outdoor luncheon on the adjoining grounds was served to everyone present.

The silver trowel used on this great occasion came into the possession of Brother and Reverend George Jarvis Prescott, Master of Columbian Lodge in 1912-1913, from the heirs of Right Worshipful B. B. Appleton; and Worshipful Brother Prescott presented it to his own Columbian Lodge in 1912. While a framed photograph of this priceless possession had been in our Room 909 for years, this relic of a great event had been languishing, lo these many years, amongst the securities owned by Columbian Lodge in its safe deposit box, we believe since 1912. At any rate it had been in Masonic darkness for 138 years, and the time had come for it to see Masonic light.

The discovery of this rare souvenir immediately posed the problem; what should we do with it? Most Worshipful Thomas Sherrard Roy suggested that Columbian Lodge lend it to the Grand Lodge, who would place it on exhibition in the Museum for the benefit of visitors in our Temple who admire and respect the giants of Masonry and their works in the days of long ago.

This was done at a Regular Communication of Columbian Lodge on March 7, 1963 attended by the Most Worshipful Grand Master and his Suite of Officers. Worshipful Master, Theodore W. Dearborn, Jr., authorized the presentation of this working tool of our profession to the Most Worshipful Grand Master, not however, as a gift, but as a loan of indefinite duration.

THE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF COLUMBIAN LODGE

The 100th Anniversary of Columbian Lodge was celebrated in two meetings.

The Centennial of the Granting of the Dispensation was held at the Second Universalist Church at Columbus Avenue and Clarendon Street, on Saturday, June 8, 1895, at 7 o'clock, P.M., then one of the most fashionable parts of the city. The Centennial of our first meeting took place in Odd Fellows Hall at Tremont and Berkeley Streets, Saturday, June 22, 189S, at 6 o'clock P.M., likewise then a fine section of the downtown area.

All important Masonic affairs were preceded by processions and followed by banquets, and these meetings were no exception to the rule. A reception and banquet were parts of the second event program, the accommodations were limited and admittance was by ticket.

The program at the Church Service, June 8th, started with:

  • An address of Welcome by Wor. J. Foster Bush, Presiding Master
  • The Historical Address by Rt. Wor. William T. R. Marvin
  • An Oration by Rt. Wor. E. Bentley Young.

Five hundred were present at each affair and they were brilliant affairs.

The June 8th exercises were attended by:

The Grand Master and the Grand Officers; all living Past Grand Masters and Past Grand Wardens; all of the District Deputy Grand Masters; the Masters and Wardens of the Lodges meeting in the Temple; the Masters and Wardens of Essex Lodge, Salem, and Revere, Aberdour and Eleusis Lodges; the Lodges in other parts of the State, the Charters of which had been granted during the year 1795 by Most Worshipful Brother Revere while he was Grand Master; the Grand Masters of Maine and Connecticut; members of the Revere family; the Governor of the State of Connecticut; the Mayor of Boston; members of the Honorable Artillery Company of London and many other, including their ladies.

A corps of ushers had been appointed to serve under the direction of Bro. Jesse E. Ames, Chief of Staff. The names of these Brethren were: Leon M. Abbott, Chas. F. Ames, A. Fisher Crowell, Fayette G. Dayton, Geo. C. Dustin, John L. Findlay, Chandler R. Folsom, Ernest A. Garland, Chester E. Gleason, W. Clifton Jones, Chas. C. Merrifield, Wm. A. Molfitt, Albert K. Page, John B. Patterson, Wm. J. Stewart, Wm. W. Wilkinson, Walter E. Wyman. These attended to seating the audience, or escorted the guests to the reception room as they arrived. In the parlors of the Church the Reception Committee, of which Bro. John C. Whiton was Chairman, had gathered to welcome the officers of the Grand Lodge and other guests. Here assembled the representatives of the daughter Lodges of Columbian, Revere, Aberdour and Eleusis — and those of the other Lodges in the State which were chartered or organized in 1795; the Officers of most of the Masonic Lodges meeting in the Temple, and others, including several descendants and relatives of our charter members, who had been specially invited. Most Worshipful Grand Master, Edwin B. Holmes, had convened a Special Communication of the Grand Lodge to do honor to the event, and with his Deputy, R. W. Brother Thorndike, his Wardens and Past Grand Master, Brother Nickerson, Grand Secretary, several of the District Deputies and other Officers, in full regalia, opened the Grand Lodge in Ample Form in an adjoining room.

Wor. Bro. J. Foster Bush, with his Officers, also opened a Special Communication of the Lodge and Bro. J. Edmiston Brown, our Marshal, then organized a procession — Rt. Wor. Bro. Charles E. Phipps, Grand Marshal, conducting the Grand Lodge — which moved up the broad aisle of the Church, headed by the Marshal, followed by the Stewards with their wands; the Chief Usher and his associates; the Reception Committee, led by Bro. John C. Whiton, and distinguished by broad ribbons of blue; the Centennial Committee, by a special badge and the medal; invited guests; the officers of Columbian Lodge in regalia; and finally the Grand Master, preceded by his Officers. Reaching the head of the aisle, the procession opened to the right and left, and, advancing in reverse order, took seats upon the platform, the Organist of the Lodge, Bro. Wm. H. Gerrish, meanwhile playing appropriate music. The "Columbian Grand March" was specially composed for the occasion by our member, Bro. Daniel L. White.

The Program for the Banquet on June 22nd was a long one — more varied, however, and the speeches were shorter, and it followed an elaborate meal.

The Toastmaster was Rt, Wor. Alonzo Folsom, Presiding Master in 1877 and 78, and Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge in 1901. Bro. Folsom was General Chairman of the entire celebration and his name is on the tablet commemorating the erection of this Temple building.

At this Banquet, there were no less than 14 toasts and accompanying responses.

The meetings in the early days took place in Concert Hall, the Temple of that era, and where the Grand Lodge held its meetings and banquets for over fifty years. Concert Hall was located at the corner of Court and Hanover Street. After their work was done, the Officers and Members of Columbian Lodge adjourned to their own private quarters on North Street near Faneuil Hall for a social hour and dinner. The social side of Masonry was an attraction then as it is now in England and Scotland.

FILE ON THE JEWELS MADE BY PAUL REVERE

On April 21, 1967 Mrs. Muriel D. Taylor, Librarian, wrote to our Brother Secretary as follows:

"Dear Mr. Howe:

We are trying to compile for our records a list of all the Constituent Lodges whose Jewels were made by Paul Revere. It has been suggested that the name of your Lodge be included on that list.

Will you please let me know at your earliest convenience whether or not Paul Revere made your Lodge Jewels. Perhaps you have other Revere items. If you know of any other Lodge whose Jewels were made by Paul Revere, we should like to be informed. In short, whatever information you can give us on the subject will be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely yours,
(Signed) Muriel D. Taylor, Librarian"

On September 13, 1967 the Lodge Historian wrote to Brother Howe as follows:

"Dear Mr. Howe:

This refers to Mrs. Taylor's letter of April 21st inquiring 
if our jewels had been made by M. W. Paul Revere. I am
 happy to say that this celebrated craftsman did fashion our 
original jewels. The order was for jewels suitable for the
 first ten Officers of the Lodge which we assume to be —

  • 
Wor. Master
  • Senior Warden
  • Junior Warden
  • Treasurer
  • Secretary
  • Senior Deacon
  • Junior Deacon
  • Senior Steward
  • Junior Steward
  • Tiler

The Lodge paid him in 1795, eight pounds 12 shillings and six-pence which, taken at $5.00 to the pound, figures around $40.00. We still have somewhere the bill, but the original jewels, in 1810, for some unknown reason, were melted down to be replaced by others which lasted for fifty-four years until the fire which completely destroyed the Boston Masonic Temple and all of its contents on April 5, 1864 . . ."

It is the intention of the present administration to examine all of the records in storage having to do with gifts, bequests and evidences of property owned by the Lodge and we may possibly be fortunate enough to run across the bill in question which, if found, could be added to the extensive Revere memorabilia built up by the Grand Lodge.

We do not know exactly what the word "jewels" refers to — whether the Master's jewel, Past Master's jewel, the emblem for each station, the apron, the collar, the rods and baton, or all together. The 1895 Centennial Volume states categorically that the jewels were made of silver. Today they would be worth their weight in gold as is the original Paul Revere sterling liberty bowl of which thousands of replicas have been made. It is owned by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts which paid $56,000 for it in 1949, Revere died in 1818 in his 84th year so that he was probably the artificer of the second set of jewels as well as the first.

200TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, JUNE 1995

From Proceedings, Page 1995-129:

We have no record in the minutes of Columbian during the year 1845 of any celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the granting of the dispensation and the First Meeting, but M. W. John Trull Heard, Master of Columbian in 1854 and 1855 and Grand Master of Massachusetts in 1857-59, personally put together a monumental history and a compendium of facts about our Lodge, a copy of which was distributed to the membership on February 7, 1856, in book form. This extraordinary piece of effort has been the source of our knowledge of the early days of our Lodge.

The Lodge also distributed to all members an elaborate account of the 1895 Centennial celebration, the church service and the banquet in an attractive bound volume and, just prior to that, put out a smaller bound volume describing the exercises at the consecration of the burial lot in Mount Auburn Cemetery which took place in June 1892.

In June of 1917, the Lodge issued in leaflet form a brief summary of Columbian's history between 1795 and 1895 written by R. W. William T. R. Marvin. The 125th Anniversary of Columbian Lodge was observed by a visit from M. W. Arthur D. Prince, Grand Master, and his Suite. Wor. George J. Prescott acted as Historian, and the details of the affair are set forth in the minutes of the June 3, 1920, meeting of the Lodge.

The 150th Anniversary occurred during the administration of R. W. Ethelbert V. Grabill, who built the celebration around a reception, dinner and pageant in the Boston Temple on Thursday, June 7, 1945. The pageant and dialogue, composed by R. W. Bro. Grabill, portrayed "The Influence of Masonry in the History of Our Nation and Masonry's Opportunity in the World Order". It contained four scenes:

  • Scene I - At Valley Forge
  • Scene II - At the Home of Benjamin Franklin
  • Scene III - In a Sub-Committee Room of the U.S. Senate
  • Scene IV - Rising Sun of Peace

The script, giving the dialogues, is probably in the papers of our late Bro. Grabill, but the Scenes and the Dramatis Personae indicate that Bro. Grabill got his inspiration from the 20th Degree (Master Ad Vitam) of the Massachusetts Consistory.

Columbian Lodge celebrated its 175th Anniversary on June 4, 1970. The Program consisted of a banquet, a Visitation by Most Worshipful Herbert H. Jaynes, an historical paper covering the last 25 years, 1945 to 1970, in the life of the Lodge, and the presentation to the Grand Lodge of the Apron and Sash worn by one of the members of Columbian at the laying of the cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument on June 17, 1825.

Everyone who has belonged, belongs now, and will belong to Columbian Lodge, is the possessor of a goodly heritage. It is the 4th oldest Lodge in the Boston First District, which contains the two oldest Lodges in the Massachusetts Jurisdiction - St. John's founded in 1733 and The Lodge of Saint Andrew founded in 1756.

Columbian Lodge came into being through a Dispensation and Charter issued by the (United) Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and signed by Paul Revere in the first year of his three-year term, that is in June 1795. He was Grand Master in 1795-96-97. Prior to 1792 there had been three Grand Lodges:

  • St. John (Provincial) Grand Lodge 1733-1792
  • Massachusetts (Provincial) Grand Lodge 1769-1777
  • Massachusetts (Independent) Grand Lodge 1777-1792

M. W. Paul Revere was made a Mason in the Lodge of Saint Andrew September 4, 1760, in which he served as Deacon, Secretary, and Senior Warden. He was its Presiding Master in 1770 and 1771, 1777 through 1779 and 1780 through 1782. He was also Master of Rising States Lodge (long since dissolved) in 1784 and 1791 and Treasurer in 1785. He was Junior Warden of the Royal Arch Lodge out of which grew Saint Andrew's Royal Arch Chapter. In the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, he was its first Senior Grand Deacon.

Paul Revere was a member of Massachusetts (Independent) Grand Lodge, having served as Senior Grand Deacon in 1769; Junior Grand Warden in 1777-78-79; and Deputy Grand Master in 1784-85 and again in 1791 -92. The St. John (Provincial) Grand Lodge and the Massachusetts (Independent) Grand Lodge united in March 1792, to form the present Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Paul Revere being the second Grand Master. It was at this time (1792) that the numbering of lodges was discontinued.

He died on May 10, 1818, in his 84th year at his home which is still preserved at 19 North Square, Boston. His outstanding Masonic career is very dear to us and makes The Lodge of Saint Andrew particularly almost a cousin to Columbian.

Most Worshipful Brother Revere's Administration took place during a period of great Masonic growth and activity. His name is on the Charters of the following particular Lodges beginning with 1795:

This makes 19 in all, and the locations mentioned show how our forbears were branching out from Boston, then a town of around 20,000 persons, and establishing in the surrounding country, charming towns, and prosperous communities, with which we are all familiar and in which many of our members have lived and now live.

HOW COLUMBIAN LODGE GOT ITS NAME

The origin of the name and the formation of the group who called themselves "The Columbian Society of Master Masons" are not known for sure, though a great deal has been written about them. It is quite possible that their immediate concern was along benevolent and social lines and their ultimate, the formation of a lodge, their own lodge, to which they could all belong. R. W. W. T. R. Marvin, in his historical address at the 100th Anniversary Banquet in 1895 (page 45), refers to the "Columbian Centinel". Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison, in his recent biography of Harrison Gray Otis 1765-1848 The Urbane Federalist, states: "The Columbian Centinel, oldest and most respectable of the Boston Federalist press, promoted Lowell's scheme" and etc. This was in 1814 just before the Hartford Convention at which the Federalists of Massachusetts and Connecticut advocated war with France and threatened to secede from the Union.

After the Revolution, Columbia and Uncle Sam became popular representations of our country. Columbia the Gem of the Ocean became a popular song and Uncle Sam in his plug hat, cutaway and striped trousers are familiar to you all. It is likely, therefore, that our forebears in Columbian chose a popular name to attach themselves to, and that they directed their publicity to the Columbian Centinel, which we can assume was a powerful Boston newspaper and a local namesake.

The first mention of the Columbians appears around 1792. They formed a committee which petitioned unsuccessfully for a charter in 1794 which indicates that their prime objective was the formation of a new lodge. This they received on their second try in 1795 and, having been instrumental in forming our Lodge and giving it its name, they gradually passed out of existence and nothing was heard of them after 1807. However, regardless of our conjecture, since there are few written traces of their history, we are grateful to them as the founders of our Columbian, because if they had not been successful in their efforts, we would not be here today.

Since the social side of Masonry was considered an important adjunct to lodge activities, the Columbians probably transferred to Columbian itself, since the latter had a hall of its own to which the members repaired after the lodge meeting was closed. In the old days, the lodges met in the evening, sodalities on Saturdays started work around seven, handled two, sometimes three degrees, and closed around ten.

The first public appearance of Columbian Lodge was at the laying of the cornerstone of the State House July 4, 1795, which was conducted with brilliant Masonic ceremony before an enormous throng of prominent military and civilian citizens. A similarly large and impressive public appearance of Columbian took place on February 11, 1800, when the funeral obsequies of George Washington were solemnized by the Fraternity under the direction of the Grand Lodge. A large procession participated, not by the Lodges as such, but by the Officers of the Lodges as individuals, each one's place being in accordance with his rank, and started at the Old State House where the General a few years before had reviewed the citizens of Boston while President, passed through the principle streets to the Old South Meeting House for the Eulogy, and reforming thence to King's Chapel where the funeral oration was delivered.

Is there anything which could more vividly portray the Boston 161 years ago and make us a part of that event than our ability to walk over the very same route and see these very same buildings, still in use everyday, just as they were in 1800?

The last occasion when our Lodge made public procession was on June 14,1892, when it dedicated our beautiful burial lot in Mount Auburn Cemetery.

Our Lodge had a banner, as did others, when in parades. Ours was white with its motto, Semper Ubique - "always everywhere" - in blue.

Our Lodge, and the other Lodges in the Boston District, met in a number of buildings and locations in central Boston, and we generally followed the Grand Lodge in its various moves. Most of the changes in location were caused by fires which resulted from the lack of fire resistant materials and construction, poor fire fighting equipment and low water pressure.

The Grand Lodge and Columbian have been in the same Temple since 1899 - for 62 years, and the longest period of time in the history of the Grand Lodge.

A detailed description of the halls in which Columbian has met starts with:

  • Concert Hall on Court Street. The Long Room in the Green Dragon Tavern on Union Street between Hanover Street and Haymarket Square
  • Columbian Hall and Mason's Hall in Market Square near Faneuil Hall
  • The Exchange Coffee House on State and Congress Streets
  • The Old State House
  • Washington Hall
  • The Old Masonic Temple which was at the corner of Tremont Street and Temple Place where the R. H. Stearns building now stands
  • Nassau Hall
  • Winthrop House
  • Thorndike Hall
  • and our present one here at the corner of Tremont and Boylston Streets
FILE ON THE JEWELS MADE BY PAUL REVERE

On April 21, 1967, Mrs. Muriel D. Taylor, Librarian, wrote to our Brother Secretary, Bill Howe, as follows:

"Dear Mr. Howe:

We are trying to compile for our records a list of all the Constituent Lodges whose Jewels were made by Paul Revere. It has been suggested that the name of your Lodge be included on that list.

Will you please let me know at your earliest convenience whether or not Paul Revere made your Lodge Jewels. Perhaps you have other Revere items. If you know of any other Lodge whose Jewels were made by Paul Revere, we should like to be informed. In short, whatever information you can give us on the subject will be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely yours,

(signed) Muriel D. Taylor, Librarian"

On September 13, 1967 the Lodge historian wrote to Brother Howe as follows:

"Dear Mr. Howe:

This refers to Mrs. Taylor's letter of April 21st inquiring if our jewels had been made by M .W. Paul Revere. I am happy to say that this celebrated craftsman did fashion our original jewels. The order was for jewels suitable for th«e first ten Officers of the Lodge which we assume would be:

  • Wor. Master
  • Senior Warden
  • Junior Warden
  • Treasurer
  • Secretary
  • Senior Deacon
  • Junior Deacon
  • Senior Steward
  • Junior Steward
  • Tyler


The Lodge paid him in 1795, eight pounds 12 shillings and six-pence which, taken at $5.00 to the pound, figures around $40.00. We still have the bill somewhere but the original jewels, in 1810, for some unknown reason, were melted down to be replaced by others which lasted for 54 years until the fire which completely destroyed the Boston Masonic Temple and all of its contents on April 25, 1864..."
It is the intention of the present administration to examine all of the records in storage having to do with gifts, bequests and evidences of property owned by the Lodge, and we may possibly be fortunate enough to run across the bill in question which, if found, could be added to the extensive Revere memorabilia built up by the Grand Lodge.

We do not know exactly what the work "jewels" refers to-whether the Master's jewel, Past Master's jewel, the emblem for each station, the apron, the collar, the rods and baton, or all together. The 1895 Centennial Volume states categorically that the jewels were made of silver. Today they would be worth their weight in gold, as is the original Paul Revere sterling silver liberty bowl, of which thousands of replicas have been made. It is owned by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts which paid $56,000 for it in 1949. Revere died in 1818 in his 84th year so that he was probably the artificer of the second set of jewels as well as the first."

"EUREKA"

The Paul Revere receipt of Jewels made for Columbian Lodge in 1795, has been found! The receipt is presently in the Museum of our National Heritage, donated to the Museum by Mrs. Godfrey S. Tompkins of Weymouth, Massachusetts, in conjunction with Columbian Lodge A.F.& A.M., Boston, MA.

THE TROWEL USED AT THE LAYING OF THE CORNERSTONE OF BUNKER HILL MONUMENT

From Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for year 1963.

ABSTRACT OF PROCEEDINGS
OF PRESENTATION OF TROWEL
USED AT LAYING OF CORNER STONE
OF BUNKER HILL MONUMENT

At a Regular Communication of Columbian Lodge on March 7, 1963, attended by the Most Worshipful Grand Master and his Suite of Officers, Brother Collins Graham, Marshal of Columbian lodge, addressed the Brethren as follows:

"Most Worshipful Grand Master, Right Worshipful Deputy Grand Master, and Members of your Suite, and Worshipful Master:

The cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument was laid before an immense throng of citizens and Masons on June 17, 1825, during the administration of Most Worshipful John Abbot of Westford, who was Grand Master in 1824, 1825 and 1826 and again in 1834; and an absorbing description of the meeting is set forth in the proceedings of the Grand Lodge for the year 1825.

At 8 o'clock in the morning the Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form, and after the introduction to the Most Worshipful Grand Master of a very large Suite, including five Past Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Brother Marquis of Lafayette and the presiding officers of the Grand Institutions in New England, a procession was formed on Boston Common, where it was joined by a large procession of military and civilian groups, and at 9 o'clock all marched over to Charlestown. Time prevents me from describing the details of this great event. However, at 10 o'clock, in keeping with the beautiful and dignified ritual of the Craft, in full form, the Grand Master, assisted by his Officers, laid the first trowel of cement, then handed it to Right Worshipful Brother Lafayette, who applied the second trowel of cement. Then followed what the public records of the day described as a magnificent oration by Mr. Daniel Webster, and finally an outdoor luncheon on the adjoining grounds was served to everyone present.

The silver trowel used on this great occasion came into the possession of Brother and Reverend George Jarvis Prescott, Master of Columbian Lodge in 1912-1913, from the heirs of Right Worshipful B. B. Appleton; and Worshipful Brother Prescott presented it to his own Columbian Lodge in 1912.

The inscription on the reverse side reads: "Trowel used by General Lafayette in laying the cornerstone of Bunker Hill Monument. Procured from heirs of Rt. Wor. B.B. Appleton and presented to Columbian Lodge by George J. Prescott, W. M. 1912." The top side is blank, excepting for a filigreed, or tessellated border. The handle is made of ivory and the blade of silver.

June 17, 1825

Memorandum on the Silver Trowel used by the Marquis of Lafayette at the Laying of the Cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument, Charlestown, Massachusetts.

The George Washington Masonic National Memorial in Alexandria, Virginia, was designed and built to safeguard the Washington relics in the possession of Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22 and to be the national monument of American Masons. The cornerstone was laid on November 1, 1923, with Presidents Calvin Coolidge and William Howard Taft officiating in the exercises, and the building was dedicated on May 12, 1932, with President Hoover assisting.

When the bronze statue of George Washington in the Great Hall was unveiled on February 22, 1950, President Truman, Past Grand Master of Missouri, participated in the program.

The Memorial Hall contains 2 murals and 6 stained glass windows which honor great Masons all closely associated with General Washington in the War of Independence. Chancellor Robert R. Livingston, Dr. Elisha Cullen Dick, Marquis of Lafayette, Benjamin Franklin, General Joseph Warren, and General Mordecai Gist.

Columbian Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Boston, instituted in June of 1795 by Most Worshipful Paul Revere, Grand Master of Massachusetts, and the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, are interested in windows 3 and 5, that is, General Lafayette and General Warren, particularly the former and the trowel which he holds in his hand.

Here we quote from the brochure issued by the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association:

"The General Lafayette Window is of Lafayette wearing the uniform of an American officer and holding the silver trowel used in the cornerstone laying of the Bunker Hill Monument. The smaller panels show Lafayette presenting key of the Bastille to Alexandria-Washington Lodge, February 21, 1825, receiving wound at Battle of Brandywine, disguised as a post boy, laying cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument, the Grandson of Benjamin Franklin presenting the sword authorized by the Congress as a gift from the United States for service, and Lafayette and Washington meeting when Lafayette brought promise of aid from France in 1778."

When the stained glass windows were installed, no one in Washington or in Boston knew the whereabouts of the famous trowel used at the laying of the cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument on June 17, 1825. It was originally in the custody of the Appleton Family, who presented it to Columbian in 1912. Columbian possessed it from that date until March 7, 1963, when the Lodge loaned it to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts for exhibition in the Museum along with other Lafayette memorabilia there. The presentation was made to Most Worshipful A. Neill Osgood, Grand Master, and is set forth in detail on page 66 of the Grand Lodge Proceedings of 1963.

As of this writing, February 10, 1995, the Trowel is in possession of our Grand Lodge, on loan from Columbian Lodge A.F. & A.M."

Excerpts from a paper prepared by Brother Collins Graham, Historian, appointed by Wor. Theodore W. Dearborn, Jr. in December, 1961.

OTHER

  • 1796 (Committee to confer with lodge)
  • 1824 (Investigation regarding clandestine Masons)
  • 1881 (Permission to wear distinctive medals; Memorial for Past GM Heard)
  • 1900 (Pratt Fund bequest)
  • 1905 (Presentation of Edward VII portrait)
  • 1941 (Reduction of fees)
  • 1943 (Suspension of secretary for un-Masonic conduct)
  • 1944 (Restoration of secretary)
  • 1963 (Presentation of the Trowel Used at the Laying of the Corner Stone of the Bunker Hill Monument)
  • 1972 (Exemplification of customary processional and recessional procedure)
  • 1987 (Presentation)

EVENTS

INSTALLATION, JANUARY 1847

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. VI, No. 4, February 1847, p. 108:

On the 21st, the officers of Columbian Lodge were publicly installed, in the new Masonic hall in the Temple, in the presence of a crowded audience of ladies and gentlemen. The address was delivered by Br. John H. Sheppard. The first officer was installed by the Grand Master, and the remainder by Br. Geo. G. Smith, Past Master of the Lodge. The ceremonies were all well received by the audience.

INSTALLATION, DECEMBER 1849

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. IX, No. 3, January 1847, p. 96:

The officers of Columbian Lodge of this city were publicly Installed on the 21st ult. The ceremonies of Installation were performed by Rt. Wor. George G. Smith in his usual happy manner. The address was delivered by R. W. Br. Rev. George M. Randall, D. G. M. and was an eminently acceptable performance. Many ladies and gentlemen not of the Fraternity were present, and seemed to be well pleased with all they saw and heard.

INSTALLATION, DECEMBER 1855

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. IX, No. 4, February 1856, p. 112:

The officers of this flourishing Lodge fur the current year, were publicly installed at the Masonic Temple, on Monday evening Dec. 31st, in the presence of a large number of Brethren and their ladies. The hall was filled at an early hour, and at half-past 7 o'clock the M. W. Grand Master and other officers of the Grand Lodge were announced and received with the usual honors. The introductory prayer was made by the Rev. Samuel Barrett, a P. G. Chaplain of the Grand Lodge, and this was followed by a hymn from the Masonic Melodies by R. W. Thomas Power, Esq.

The Master elect, W. William B. Fowle, Jr. was then installed into his office by his immediate predecessor, R. W. John T . Heard, Esq., in a beautifully appropriate and impressive manner. The new Master next installed his associates in office; when, after the usual proclamation, an able and eloquent address was pronounced by the Rev. George M. Randall, P. G. M. A prayer was then offered by Rev. Br. Alger, and the ceremonies were closed by the singing of another of Br. Power's beautiful hymns, beginning -

"We met in love; we part in peace."

Columbian is one of the four oldest Lodges in this city, having been chartered in the year 1796, and is the largest and one of the most flourishing and respectable in the State. Its members number nearly two hundred, - a number perhaps too large for the convenient working of a single Lodge; and yet we can hardly think any of the Brethren at fault, in not wishing to separate from the pleasant associations that cluster around the history of their venerable alma·mater.

We are gratified in being able to state that a very complete and valuable history of the Lodge, from the pen of its late W. Master, Col. Heard, is now in press, and will be published in the course of the present month.

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP, APRIL 1861

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XX, No. 7, May 1861, Page 200:

The following interesting report was adopted by Columbian Lodge of this city, at its regular meeting in April last;—

To Sylvester Trull, Esq., Worshipful Master of Columbian Lodge:

The Committee to whom were referred the proposition to admit M. W. William D. Coolidge and W. Peter C. Jones to Honorary Membership in Columbian Lodge, have given to them careful and respectful consideration.

It is understood by the Committee that the Lodge contemplates, in conferring honorary membership, to compliment and honor Brethren who have rendered distinguished service (o this Lodge; or, who have become eminent among Masons for their valuable labors in the jurisdiction of Massachusetts or for the general Brotherhood; or, who, being active, worthy members of our institution, hold honorable position in other relations of life. Such persons it is desirable should compose our list of honor; and it therefore becomes a matter of care and importance that the enrollment thereon of every name should be that of one whose qualifications are of the highest character, as manifested in one, at least, of the spheres of action above mentioned.

In the candidates into whose merits and qualifications it is the pleasant duty of your committee to inquire, we are happy to recognize Brethren who have labored long and with more than ordinary fidelity, as members and officers, for the prosperity of this Lodge, and who have gained elsewhere in this Commonwealth most honorable position for their intelligence and integrity as Masons.

Brother Coolidge, the present Grand Master of Massachusetts, was initiated in this Lodge on the 6th of January, 1842, and admitted as a member on the 19th of May of that year. He was our Junior Steward in 1843 and 1844; Junior Deacon in 1845; Junior Warden in 1846, 1847 and 1848; Senior Warden in 1850 and 1851, and Master in 1852 and 1853. His official duties were performed with exactitude and ability ; and as a member, whether in office or out, he has always been among the foremost in everything calculated to advance our honor and welfare.

In the Grand Lodge he has been active and influential. His connection with that body has been signalized by a series of official services continued without interruption for more than twelve years and terminating in his election to the highest office in the gift of Masons. He was G. S. Bearer in 1849, 1850, 1851 and 1855; G. Steward in 1852, 1853 and 1854; G. Marshal in 1856; D. D. G. Master in 1857, 1858 and 1859; J. G. Warden in 1860; and at the election in December last, he was chosen Grand Master. Here, too, his exertions have not been confined to official duties, as his services on important committees and those rendered to his predecessors in the Grand Mastership, fully and honorably attest.

In the establishment of Dalhousie Lodge in Newton, during; the past year, he has taken a leading part, and presided over it until he was chosen to his present office.

The initiation of Brother Jones took place in this Lodge on the first day of April 1841, and he was admitted a member of it on the third of June in the same year. He was Junior Deacon in 1842; Senior Deacon in 1843, 1844 and 1845; Senior Warden in 1846 and 1847; and Master in 1848 and 1849. He has ever been most constant in his attendance on our meetings, giving us in this respect an example worthy of imitation. But his attendance has not been one of supineness as to the doings of the Lodge; on the contrary, he has always manifested the liveliest interest in all our transactions and labored with zeal for the good name and well-being of the Lodge, No one has been more active; no one more solicitous for our welfare. Familiar with the entire routine of the Lodge duty and possessing an accurate knowledge of the ritual, great weight is justly attached to his opinions and counsels thereon. During the first ten years after Bro. Jones' initiation, the means of instruction in the lectures were obtained only with difficulty, and his capacity to teach was often called into requisition, not only by members of this Lodge, but by those of other Lodges both of the city and country. This work alone, so important was it at the time it was rendered, would entitle our Brother to our gratitude.

Brother Jones has done also some service in Grand Lodge. He was G. S. Bearer in 1857, 1858, 1859 and 1860; and is the present J. G. Deacon. On the withdrawal of Bro. Coolidge as Master of Dalhousie Lodge, Brother Jones was appointed to succeed him, which station he now fills. Both of the candidates are connected with Chapter and Encampment Masonry.

Brother Jones has held with credit high offices in St. Andrew's R. A. Chapter and Boston Encampment. In view of the distinguished Masonic services of Brothers Coolidge and Jones, the committee heartily recommend that they be admitted as Honorary Members of Columbian Lodge.

The committee would state that the Honorary Members of this Lodge, now surviving, are—

  • Joshua B. Flint, admitted in 1840.
  • George G. Smith, admitted in 1840.
  • William M. Stedman, admitted in 1847.
  • Warren Fisher, admitted in 1847.
  • David Tillson, admitted in 1847.
  • Edward Prescott, admitted in 1849.
  • William C. Martin, admitted in 1849.
  • Samuel Smith, admitted in 1855.
  • Hon. Joseph R. Chandler, admitted in 1855.
  • Benjamin Stevens, admitted in 1855.
  • Rev. Edward T. Taylor, admitted in 1855.
  • George M. Randall, D. D., admitted in 1805.
  • John T. Heard, admitted in 1856.

All of which is respectfully submitted by the Committee.

(Signed,)
John T. Heard,
Robert L. Bobbins,
Boston, March 23rd, 1861.

Preston A. Ames.

VISIT OF KING KALAKAUA, DECEMBER 1874

From New England Freemason, Vol. II, No. 1, January 1875, Page 43:

King Kalakaua.—The King of the Sandwich Islands visited Columbian Lodge, of Boston, at its Stated Communication on the 7th inst. A son of a Past Master of that Lodge has been for some years a resident of the Sandwich Islands, and is a Past Master of one of the Lodges there. It was therefore thought peculiarly proper for Columbian Lodge to extend to his Majesty special Masonic courtesies and hospitalities, on the occasion of his recent visit to our city. The King was accompanied by Gov. Kapena and Lieut. Com. Totten.

The Corinthian Hall was of course crowded. Among the distinguished visitors present were Past Grand Masters Lewis, Heard and Coolidge, several of the District Deputy Grand Masters, and Brother Charles Bradlaugh, the English reform lecturer. The third degree was exemplified by W. Brother William J. Stevens, Master of the Lodge, assisted by his officers, and the visiting Brethren expressed great gratification with the exhibition of work. When it was concluded, the company, numbering some three hundred, repaired to the banqueting hall, where a most abundant and elaborate supper had been provided by Brother J. B. Smith. The substantials having been disposed of, brief but animated speeches followed in rapid succession from the King, Governor Kapena, Lieut. Commander Totten, the Past Grand Masters, Brothers Bradlaugh and Smith, and others. The wine was abundant, the company was in a lively mood, and the speakers were brilliant. The King enjoyed it all in the highest degree, declaring just before he left the table that he was "red hot"—or, as we say Masonically, "well ignited." We think it will be long before he forgets his visit to Columbian Lodge.

There are three Lodges in the Sandwich Islands: Le Progres de L'Oceanie, established in 1843, under the jurisdiction of the Supreme Council of France; the Hawaiian Lodge of Honolulu, and the Wailukee Lodge of Maui. The last two are under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of California. The two first named occupy a hall in common at Honolulu, the capital of the Islands. The Hawaiian Lodge has a good library, the use of which is freely allowed to the other Lodge. These three Lodges number among their members natives, Americans, Englishmen and Germans, between whom the most friendly relations subsist. The Fraternity exercises a powerful influence in that community. It is said that four-fifths of the better class of the male population of Honolulu belong to one Lodge or the other. The King has long been an active member of the Lodge Le Progres de l'Oceanie, and is very regular and constant in his attendance upon its Communications. His brother, Prince William Pitt Leleihoku, was recently raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason in the Hawaiian Lodge.

GRAND MASTER VISIT, JUNE 1878

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. II, No. 4, July 1878, Page 125:

A friendly visit was paid to Columbian Lodge, by the Wor. Masters' Association of the First Masonic District, on Thursday evening, June 6th, when W. Bro. A. A. Folsom, received the Association of which he is also a member, in a very cordial manner, and subsequently invited them to participate in a banquet prepared for the Lodge.

We cannot too highly commend the practice in this Lodge of examining newly made Brethren in the Lectures of the Degrees through which they have passed; it was really refreshing to witness the handsome manner in which a young Brother went through the ordeal, and listen to the correctness of his answers. Such a course educates Masons, after making them.

Near the East stood two pitchers highly ornamented and beautifully decorated, which, as we were told, had not been used by the Lodge for thirty years, indeed the older members had forgotten them, and the younger ones knew nothing about them. When they were presented to the Lodge, it was voted to place them in care of the Treasurer. In 1S49, John Bigelow was elected to the office, vacated by the death of Ruel Baker, the pitchers came into his possession, where they remained until they were again transferred by his recent death.

Brother Horace Collamore, who kept a China and Glass Store on Washington Street, near Franklin, presented them to the Lodge under date of July 1st, [Sin. In his note to W. Bro. Aaron Bean he said, "Right Worshipful Brother Bean, Dear Sir. — I have taken the liberty to cause two accompanying Pitchers to be manufactured, With an intention of presenting them to Columbian Lodge, in which I received the lirsi rays of Masonic Light, a Lodge endeared to me by a thousand nameless ties — a Lodge whose diffusive benevolence has so often dried the widow's tears, and caused the orphan's heart to leap for gladness." The thanks of the Lodge were returned, by vote, "for the superb and valuable present of two elegant pitchers, Wlth appropiiate Masonic emblems."

It is worth quite a journey to see the Pitchers, and it is worth much to the Lodge to haw such testimony to its beneficent work in its early history, Its present excellence is also secure.

SPECIAL MEETING, NOVEMBER 1886

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. X, No. 8, November 1886, Page 251:

Columbian Lodge, Boston, received Rt. Wor. Bro. Burrill on his annual visitation November 4th, being the night of its regular communication, and worked the third degree with more elaborate musical effects than has ever before been attempted. A triple quartette, divided into three quartettes during certain portions of the ceremony, and stationed in the east, west and south, rendered several selections that hail been specially prepared by Bro. William H. Gerrish in a most artistic manner. Other portions of each section of the degree were "beautified and adorned" by chorals, hymns and antiphonal responses.

While the ritual throughout was rendered with scrupulous accuracy, the music so freely interspersed throughout the work gave a new impressiveness to the degree, and delighted the four hundred and forty members and visitors who were present, more than half remaining attentive listeners to the close at 10.45. Among prominent Masons present were W. Bros. F. Herbert Winsor and E. H. Richards, Wardens; W. Bro. Hodges, Marshal; and W. Bro. Eustis, Secretary of the Deputation; Rt. Wor. Senior Gr. Warden Marvin and Wor. and Rev. Bro. Israel, Grand Chaplain; Rt. W. Bro. Fay, P. G. W., and others from the Grand Lodge; Lt. Gov; Ames, an Honorary member of this lodge. All remained to the close. There were also many others of distinction in'Masonry present, from Salem, Providence, New York, London, and San Francisco, and Dixey, the comedian, altogether making up one of the most cosmopolitan assemblies we have seen for a long time in a Masonic lodge-room. Wor. Bro. Young retires from office after a most brilliant term of service.

OFFICIAL VISIT, NOVEMBER 1886

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. X, No. 8, November 1886, Page 254:

The annual visitation to Joseph Warren Lodge, F. A. M., Masonic Temple, was made on Tuesday evening, October 26th, by R. W. Herbert L. Burrill, D. D. G. M. of the First Masonic District, and the following suite: W. Henry J. Parker, D. S. G. W.; W. William G. Whitney, D. J. G. W.; W. E. B. Holmes, D. G. T.; W. George P. Eustis, D. G. S. W.; William B. Hodges, D. G. Marshal. An exemplification of the work was given by W. M. Eugene H. Richards and officers. During the evening. W. Bro. James M. Gleason presented to the lodge, in behalf of Bro. Edward H. Studley, a handsomely engrossed copy of the by-laws of the lodge. The gift was accepted with suitable acknowledgment by W. Bro. Richards. The present is a beautiful sample of penmanship and drawing, and has been a labor of love with Bro. Studiey. The heading has the name of the lodge and various Masonic emblems drawn in colors. At the close a collation was served in the banquet hall, where an hour was passed in a social way.

PRESENTATION, JANUARY 1907

From New England Craftsman, Vol. II, No. 4, January 1907, Page 143:

A Notable Event in Columbian Lodge, Boston.

A notable event that is without parallel in our recollection took place in Columbian Lodge at its last annual meeting in December.

WilliamTRMarvin1907.jpg
William T. R. Marvin,
Secretary of Columbian Lodge, Boston

The circumstance was a formal recognition of the long and valuable service of Rt. Wor. William T. R. Marvin as Secretary of the lodge. Bro. Marvin has been secretary of the Lodge twenty four years during which time he has been absent from but three meetings. The Master, Wor. Leon M. Abbott, desiring to express in a substantial manner the appreciation of the brethren for the very able manner in which Brother Marvin had performed the duties of his office and in a way compensate him for his valuable time given in service of the lodge conceived the idea of raising a substantial sum of money to present him on his twenty-fifth installation as Secretary. About November ist he sent a letter to every member of his lodge stating what he wished to accomplish, requesting that the matter be kept secret so that Bro. Marvin should know nothing about it. In response Voluntary contributions came in rapidly and in generous sums until the amount of nine hundred dollars was reached. This sum was presented to Bro. Marvin at the Annual Meeting by Wor. Brother Abbott, whose remarks at the time were Substantially as follows:

"Brethren of Columbian Lodge, and Wor. Bro. Marvin, for what I now have to say chiefly concerns you:

"When I became Master of Columbian Lodge little did I think that at the close of my first year I should be called upon to prefer and present in open Lodge charges against an official associate, and that one the Secretary of the Lodge, who has been honored by being retained in that position for a period of twenty-four years. But my duty is plain, and I have no alternative but to present these charges. And I desire to say in advance that they are not the vaporiugs of disordered brains nor disgruntled members, neither are they the result of injured feelings, but rather are they the expression of calm and deliberate judgment, honest and sincere conviction. Many of these charges have been reduced to writing over the signature of members, and in the form of a letter addressed to me as Master.

"Wor. Bro. Marvin, you are charged with loyally and faithfully discharging the duties of your office and exemplifying in largest measure the truest and best type of Masonic service ; you are charged with receiving and appropriating to yourself the respect, the love and the gratitude of the members of Columbian Lodge. You stand convicted upon these charges!

"A month ago a letter was sent to each member of Columbian giving him an opportunity to evidence by a small contribution his feeling and regard for you. An extract from two or three of the many letters received in reply serve to illustrate the character of them all. No subscription paper has been passed, but every expression has been spontaneous and from the heart — and back of it all there lies a wealth of affection for you that far outweighs and over-shadows all form of expression.

"May you feel the tender touch of that world of sympathetic interest and loyal comradeship that goes out to you, and may it brighten and cheer every remaining day and hour of your life.

"Perhaps it may sometimes have seemed to you as though it were hardly worth while to give so constantly and generously of your time and service to the affairs of thc Lodge, its members and of Masonry, but I hope that you may go away from here tonight realizing as never before that deeds of simple kindness are never lost, and that loving and consecrated service for the good of others brings the sweetest and choicest of God's blessings.

"This little testimonial from the Jneinbcrs of Columbian Lodge in the form of a check for $900 is but a trilling token, but it goes to you weighted and freighted with the deepest and strongest and truest Brotherly love we know.

"There is no wish that is closer to our hearts than that you may long live to enjoy the confidence of your fellowmen, to inspire them by the splendid example of your life and work. the radiance of which shall never continue to brighten and illumine the pages of the Masonic history of our day.

"May every success attend you, Hind each succeeding year bring to you an added and deeper, richer, and abiding peace and joy."

The raising of the fund was absolutely without the knowledge of Bro. Marvin and the presentation an entire surprise. At the conclusion of the remarks of Wor. Brother Abbott the entire Lodge rose and sang Auld Lang Syne. Bro. Marvin was much effected and could not speak above a whisper. He thanked the Lodge very earnestly and with a flash of his old time wit turned to the Master and said to him "that the Secretary had a right to know what was going on in the Lodge." Bro. Marvin was escorted back to his station by the Marshall, accompanied by the most enthusiastic hand-clapping and reception from the members ever ■witnessed in the Lodge. The affair sparks a very happy event in the history of Columbian Lodge and reflects great credit upon its members, especially upon its Wor. Master, Bro. Abbott to whose kind heart and generous disposition the whole affair must be credited.

GOVERNORS' NIGHT, FEBRUARY 1907

From New England Craftsman, Vol. II, No. 6, March 1907, Page 228:

The regular meeting of Columbian Lodge A. F. & A. M., held in Masonic Temple, Boston, February 7th was one of unusual interest. It was a governors night. Governor Curtis Guild, Jr., a member of the Lodge and Ex-Governor John L. Bates, an honored member of the Fraternity, were present and with Grand Master J. Albert Blake, were the special guests of the evening. It was on the program to have Governor John McLane of New Hampshire, a past grand master of the Grand Lodge of that state, present but he was unable to be there.

The Lodge was opened early in the afternoon for the despatch of business. At about 5:30 o'clock a committee consisting of all of the living Past Masters of the Lodge, fourteen in number, introduced Most Wor. J. Albert Blake, grand master. He was accompanied by the following distinguished brethren: R. W. Arthur T. Way, Deputy Grand Master; R. W. Edward G. Graves, Senior Grand Warden; R. W. Albro A. Osgood, acting Junior Grand Warden; Brother Curtis Guild, Jr., and Brother John L. Bates; Past Grand Masters R. W. Edwin B. Holmes, R. W. Charles T. Gallagher and R. W. Baalis Sanford; R. W. Charles H. Ramsay, Grand Treasurer; R. W. Sereno D. Nickerson, Recording Grand Secretary; R. W. Brothers Albert B. Root and George J. Tufts, District Deputy Grand Masters of the First and Second Districts; Wor. Brothers Oliver A. Roberts, William L. Olin, Secretary of State; Dana Malone, Attorney General; Herbert W. Thayer, master of Excelsior Lodge and George W. Chester, Grand Tyler. There were many other prominent Masons present who were not on the suite of the grand master, conspicuous among whom was Most Excellent Harry Hunt, Grand High Priest of the Grand R. A. Chapter of Mass. and numerous other Past Masters and past officers of other Masonic bodies.

As soon as the guests were received by the master of the lodge, Wor. Leon M. Abbott, which was done in a most graceful manner, a procession was organized and all marched to the banquet hall where an elaborate dinner was served to a company of nearly four hundred. There was no speech making at the dinner that feature of the festivities being reserved for a latter hour. At 7:30 o'clock the exercises of the Lodge were resumed. Soon after eight o'clock the Wor. Master introduced Bro. Curtis Guild, Jr. who delivered ait admirable address having for its inspiration the sentiments of Respect, Brotherly Love and Courage. These words in a great measure led the thought of the succeeding speakers in parallel direction if not in identical expression. The speakers who followed Brother Guild were: R. W. Charles T. Gallagher, Right Eminent E. Bentley Young, Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of Massachusetts and Rhode Island and Past Master of Columbian Lodge; Brother John L. Bates; Wor. Brother Dana Malone; Brother J. Payson Bradlee and Brother the Rev. Frank W. Merrick. The Most Worshipful Grand Master was obliged to leave the Lodge before the hour had arrived for speaking but in response to the invitation of Wor. Bro. Abbott he addressed the members in ,, short speech of good wishes and congratulations.

All who were present at this meeting of Columbian Lodge agree that it was a meeting of remarkable interest and Wor. Bro. Abbott who had planned its details with so much care and judgment may be congratulated on the success that crowned his efforts. We have never attended a Masonic meeting where there was a better or more cordial spirit exhibited. The sentiments expressed by the speakers were of high order and their words an inspiration for the best ideals of life and the highest type of Masonic character.

ANNUAL MEETING, DECEMBER 1907

From New England Craftsman, Vol. III, No. 4, January 1908, Page 143:

Of the many interesting meetings of Columbian Lodge, Boston, which have been held during the past three years, during which time Brother Leon M. Abbott has officiated as Worshipful Master of the lodge, none have exceeded in interest that held Thursday, December 5, which was the closing event in the official connection of Brother Abbott with his lodge. The lodge was opened for business at 4 o'clock with a large attendance of brethren. At 6 o'clock a banquet was served, which was followed by speeches of marked interest. The speakers were: Kx-Gov. Bro. John L. Bates; Most Worshipful J. Albert Blake, Grand Master; Wor. Melvin M. Johnson, Grand Marshal; Wor. Harry Hunt, grand high priest of the Grand R. A. Chapter and last, the youngest member of the lodge, Bro. Arthur D. Hill, who was admitted a member on the same day. The speeches were of high order and attracted the close attention of all present.

It was nearly nine o'clock when the members returned to the lodge room to listen to the annual reports, elect and install officers for the coming year. The officers elected were: Thorton D. Apollonio, Worshipful Master; W. Clifton Jones, Senior Warden; Rev. George J. Prescott, Junior Warden; Rt. Wor. E. Bentley Young, Treasurer; Rt. Wor. William T. R. Marvin, Secretary. Only the three first officers were installed. The appointed officers were not named at that time. Columbian Lodge is one of the must popular in the jurisdiction. A spirit of enthusiastic good fellowship and Masonic loyalty pervades its membership that might well serve as an inspiration to all others.

INSTALLATION, JANUARY 1912

From New England Craftsman, Vol. VII, No. 5, February 1912, Page 169:

A Public Installation of the officers of Columbian lodge, Boston, took place January 4th. The lodge was honored by the presence of Grand Master Everett C. Benton. The program included reception, musical entertainment and dancing. The officers were installed by Rt. Wor. E. Bentley Young assisted by Wor. T. D. Apollonio. Officers are: George J. Prescott, Worshipful Master; Howard M. Fletcher, Senior Warden; Franklin C. Jillson, Junior Warden; E. Bentley Young (P. M.), Treasurer; William T. R. Marvin (P. M.), Secretary; Rev. John Matteson, Chaplain; Horace W. Stickney, Marshal; Elmer C. Read, and H. La Rue Brown, Deacons; George F. Willey, and F. F. B. Converse, Stewards; F. G. Dayton, Inside Sentinel; William H. Gerrish, Organist and B. Wesley Brown, Tyler.

RECEPTION OF GRAND MASTER ABBOTT, JANUARY 1917

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XII, No. 4, January 1917, Page 118:

FranklinJillson.jpg MosesPlummer1917.jpg EdwardWest.jpg
Jillson, Plummer, West

The January meeting of Columbian Lodge, held in Masonic Temple, Boston, Mass., January 4, was a particularly interesting occasion by reason of the fact that Worshipful Master, Franklin C. Jillson, had advised the members that this was to be strictly a members' meeting and was in the nature of a reception to the new Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, Leon M. Abbott, a member of Columbian Lodge.

The Post Prandial Exercises were extremely interesting several past masters making brief addresses eulogising Grand Master Abbott, among whom were Right Worshipful Moses C. Plummer, Worshipful George J. Prescott and Worshipful Walter Cameron.

The Grand Master in the course of his remarks made reference to a chapter in Masonic history in Massachusetts with which our readers may not be entirely familiar and which we give herewith for their edification. From Columbian Lodge have come to the rank of Grand Master, eleven members, and a review of the history of these prominent Masons is given herewith:

Hon. Members of Columbian Lodge:

Grand Masters Who Received the Degrees In Columbian Lodge:

Degrees in Columbian Lodge and Grand Masters Elsewhere:

  • Joseph R. Chandler, Grand Master of Pennsylvania, 1841 and 1842.
  • Lawrence N. Greenleaf, Grand Master of Colorado, 1880.

Biographical sketches have been placed on the corresponding pages.

GRAND MASTER VISIT, APRIL 1918

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XIII, No. 7, April 1918, Page 218:

The eighteen hundred and thirty-fourth ommunication of Columbian Lodge, held in Masonic Temple, Boston, April fourth, as a particularly happy occasion.

Gathering early for work, at which one of the candidates, a pure blooded Cingalese, Edward Basil Nathanielsz, of Ceylon, received the entered apprentice degree, the meeting adjourned early for social purposes after receiving as guest a distinguished gathering of Masons who were present as escort to the Most Worshipful Grand Master Leon M. Abbott, a member of Columbian Lodge.

Inspiring addresses were delivered by the Past Grand Master Melvin M. Johnson, Rev. Francis L. Beal, D. D. and other members of the company, the keynote of which was loyalty to the flag of our country and the fundamentals of our own institution. Musical selections by a chorus of Columbian men imder the leadership of Bro. J. Russell Abbott, together with several delightful cello solos by Bro. Leon Van Vliet, were an interesting part of a fine program and altogether the evening breathed the true Columbian Lodge spirit, than which none better exists.

ElmerCRead.jpg
Elmer C. Read

Worshipful Elmer C. Read, presiding officer of this fine old lodge, whose portrait is reproduced above, is to be congratulated on the success of his efforts to provide for Columbian members and their guests a splendid meeting.

125TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, JUNE 1920

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XV, No. 9, June 1920, Page 279:

Columbian Lodge of Boston, celebrated the 125th anniversary of its founding on Thursday. June 3, at Masonic Temple, Boston, with appropriate exercises.

While no elaborate program had been nrovided the event was clothed with dig-nitv am' true Masonic fellowship, the presence of Most Worshipful Grand Master Arthur D. Prince and officers of the Grand Lodge, together with P. G. M. Leon M. Abbott, himself a past master of Columbian, lending grace to the occasion, and the felicitous remarks of the distinguished brethren at the dinner giving evidence of the high standing of Columbian Lodge and the esteem in which it is held by the Grand Lodge and all who know its hospitality.

The Grand Master of Oddfellows of Massachusetts, a member of Paul Revere Lodge, brought greetings from the Grand Lodge of Oddfellows and assurances that in the great work devolving on the membership of the two great fraternities, no rivalry save that of who best can serve exists.

The Worshipful Master of Columbian Lodge, George L. Willey. and his officers, are to be commended for their good work in maintaining the high standard which has existed in the past both with regard to excellence in ritual and exemplification of the true Masonic spirit. The affair was a delightful one.

LADIES' NIGHT, MAY 1942

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XXXVII, No. 9, May 1942, Page 175:

Columbian Lodge of Boston held one of its rare Ladies' Nights on May 7th in Masonic Temple, 51 Boylston Street, which was an outstanding and enjoyable occasion. A reception at 6-6:30 in the banquet hall was followed by dinner and entertainment by a notable list of artists. Many members and their ladies were present and the affair was hugely enjoyed.

This fine old lodge was instituted in 1795 and has contributed outstanding leaders to the craft not only in Grand Lodge but other bodies as well. The present Master, Adam Hofling, is sustaining well the excellent reputation it has as an exemplar of Massachusetts Freemasonry at its best.

200TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, JUNE 1995

From TROWEL, Winter 1995, Page 24:

Columbian Lodge Celebrates Bicentennial Anniversary

On Saturday. June 17, 1995, Columbian Lodge of Boston celebrated its 200th Anniversary in the State House. Boston.

The Lodge was opened by Wor. Michael Sandberg. Master, in the "Great Hall" which was decorated with flags of the Colonial period and many flags of the many towns of the Commonwealth.

M. W. David W. Lovering was escorted into the State House Hall of Flags with fifer and drummer and color bearer, members of the Sudbury Ancient Fyffe and Drum Company. They played "Yankee Doodle".

M. W. Donald W. Vose, with a committee of Past Masters of the Lodge, escorted and introduced M. W. David W. Lovering, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts. The Grand Master, in his opening remarks to the Lodge members and friends, expressed his delight to be present to celebrate the Bicentennial Anniversary of Columbian Lodge and called upon Wor. Bro. Sandberg to join him at the podium for the purpose of presenting the Lodge a Proclamation authorizing the Brethren to wear a special 200th Anniversary Medal. A framed Anniversary Medal was presented to the Grand Master for the archives in Grand Lodge as a record of this occasion.

R. W. Robert Hartley, D. G. M.. spoke of the long and proud history of the Lodge. M. W. David B. Richardson, P. G. M., addressed the large gathering and recalled a number of fond memories of the Lodge.

R. W. Homer Shellenberger, D. D. G. M., Boston 1st District, expressed his pleasure at being present for such an important occasion.

R. W. D. James Phillips, Lodge Historian, spoke about the beginnings of the Lodge and how it was named. He also spoke about some important events which took place in the Lodge.

A special booklet was published highlighting the events since the 175th Anniversary. The booklet was presented to those present at the conclusion of the evening. Included was a summary of the stewardship of each Master during his term of office.

Bro. Paul Revere chartered between 17 and 24 Lodges; eight will celebrate their anniversaries in 1995.

R. W. Robert Stevens, P. S. G. W., presented "Freemasonry 200 Years Ago." In his closing remarks, the Grand Master spoke about the contributions the members of Columbian Lodge have made over the many years to Grand Lodge and the community. He invited the Brethren to join him on July 4th for the reenactment of the Laying of the Cornerstone of the Statehouse which was done by M. W. Paul Revere on July 4, 1795.

A fine dinner was served in the State House to the accompaniment of dinner music. Bro. Ron Doucette, a member of the Anniversary Committee in charge of having the Bicentenary Medal struck, spoke briefly about the medal and then had them distributed to Lodge members. After dinner several donations and scholarships were given, including: the Masonic Home: DeMolay Foundation: Boston Scottish Rite Learning Center: Knight Templar Educational Foundation: Shrine Burns Hospital: George Washington Memorial: New England Home for Little Wanderers; and the Grand Lodge Library. Bro. Michael Cheteyan announced that Ms. Stephanie Borgia, a guest of the Lodge, was the recipient of the educational award of $5,000 named in honor of M. W. Donald W. Vose. P. G. M. M.W. David Lovering noted that the Grand Lodge had given six $500.00 and five $5,000.00 scholarships this year. The event was an exciting and successful evening in the life of an old and distinguished Columbian Lodge of Boston. An evening done in "Columbian Style."


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